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Ruki Yuki
07-24-2009, 05:05 PM
I was just wondering...I know its of some importance, but just how importance is costume accuracy?

I'm a little nervous about my costume. I'm making it based on my own design..I'm going as carbuncle from Final Fantasy (8 to be specific). However, the only..carbuncley parts are going to be my headpiece, arm and leg wear..and a tail..My top and shorts are going to be normal clothes..Is this okay? ToT;;;; It might be cute but as far as accuracy goes..Yeah..I'm not so sure. I'll look more human than carbuncle but still..x.x

Is it okay to wear my own humanized version of carbuncle?

Twingenuity
07-24-2009, 05:19 PM
I saw humanized versions of a lot of things at Otakon this year. Everything from Pikachu, to Liger zero. I think Cosplay is mostly about expressing yourself, and having a love for what you're doing. SURE some people might not get it at the con, but if you personally invest time, effort, and money into something, it'll always be great for you.

Bitter
07-24-2009, 05:23 PM
I think the most important thing is that YOU like your cosplay!

alpha_helix
07-24-2009, 05:47 PM
Yeah, as long as you're happy with it, who care?

I personally take a lot of liberty with my costumes, I think I'm more oriented toward design that than trying to replicate something exactly. I always make sure that I can justify my choices, though, whether it be from a design, aesthetics, or practicality standpoint. That way, if someone points out that I'm not 100% accurate, I already have an answe

CapsuleCorp
07-24-2009, 07:50 PM
Honestly? I find I don't get as much attention if I'm wearing something that isn't immediately recognizable.

And I have no way of telling whether people are avoiding me because they don't know what I'm supposed to be, or are secretly thinking "god, is that supposed to be, like, casual [character] or something? It looks like they didn't bother to get a wig/make the coat/do the research."

Do people actually think this? Yes. Yes they do. Do they tell you to your face? No, not uless they're total jerks.

Seeshelle
07-24-2009, 08:03 PM
As long as you like it and feel proud of it, then don't worry. I'd like to keep things as accurate as I can so people know who I am-- but that's me. I don't think anyone would say anything negative. I see con goers as friendly, nice people so far. There have been a few rude/mean people, but it's still few.

PandaPuff
07-24-2009, 08:05 PM
Capsule Corp: The sad sad truth. Even I admit it.

Tampopo_Hoshi
07-24-2009, 08:08 PM
Will I be scrutinized if the jacket for my Ash cosplay is little a couple of shades lighter?

CapsuleCorp
07-24-2009, 08:14 PM
A "couple shades?" Now you're treading the fine line. There's accuracy and there's accuracy.

Pandapuff - I know. Sad truths must be spoken, though. I appreciate the attempt to stay positive and upbeat and everybody loves everybody, but I prefer honesty. I accept that there are people who don't value accuracy the way I do (because I am a perfection-level replicator, not everyone is like me and I know this) but I also think it's unfair to not educate newcomers to the hobby about how everyone is different and sometimes people are jerks.

Aduial
07-24-2009, 08:27 PM
Accuracy only matters most when you are in craftmanship contest; the judges there want to see how close you can get to your character's outfit. Even then, changes have to be made. For instance, when I competed at AMA in my Ciel ballgown, I admitted to the judges that I had no idea what the back looked like. One image shows it this way, another image shows it that way, and the random box figure shows it somehow completely different from the first two. So I made it up on how I thought the back should look and how it would best compliment my cosplay. And it worked.

If you're competing, accuracy counts. If you're not, accuracy counts to a degree otherwise your cosplay won't get recognized. However, if you're taking a character that looks/is an animal and making a human rendition...well, accuracy only accounts for so much there. As long as you are happy with it, it shouldn't matter much.

Tampopo_Hoshi
07-24-2009, 11:58 PM
A "couple shades?" Now you're treading the fine line. There's accuracy and there's accuracy.

Pandapuff - I know. Sad truths must be spoken, though. I appreciate the attempt to stay positive and upbeat and everybody loves everybody, but I prefer honesty. I accept that there are people who don't value accuracy the way I do (because I am a perfection-level replicator, not everyone is like me and I know this) but I also think it's unfair to not educate newcomers to the hobby about how everyone is different and sometimes people are jerks.

Well not a couple of shades but it is a little bit lighter than his jacket. But it some pictures it looks lighter in others it looks darker so I don't really know. It's accurate enough that people will recognize I'm Ash though.

Ruki Yuki
07-25-2009, 01:46 AM
Thanks everyone :3

I think its cute..I kinda made it the way I did because of my body type..x.x;;

infinitydragon
07-25-2009, 10:00 AM
Accuracy only matters most when you are in craftmanship contest; the judges there want to see how close you can get to your character's outfit. Even then, changes have to be made. For instance, when I competed at AMA in my Ciel ballgown, I admitted to the judges that I had no idea what the back looked like. One image shows it this way, another image shows it that way, and the random box figure shows it somehow completely different from the first two. So I made it up on how I thought the back should look and how it would best compliment my cosplay. And it worked.


This, so much;
I have this exact problem now with the one I'm making as the art all has slightly diffrent pattens on the shorts, 3 diffrent sholder strap varitations in 2 diffrent colours, so many diffrent shades; none of the art agrees on the details and I've had to take what will work.


Will I be scrutinized if the jacket for my Ash cosplay is little a couple of shades lighter?

Theres accurate and then theres pedantic, anyone who compleins is the latter.
Theres bound to be some offical art somewhere where the jacket is the exact same colour as yours. Most of the time shades of outfits vary so much in art so much you often just haft to go with what you find (one cotume I made this year had a range from bright purple to dark blue).

Tampopo_Hoshi
07-25-2009, 12:43 PM
This, so much;
I have this exact problem now with the one I'm making as the art all has slightly diffrent pattens on the shorts, 3 diffrent sholder strap varitations in 2 diffrent colours, so many diffrent shades; none of the art agrees on the details and I've had to take what will work.




Theres accurate and then theres pedantic, anyone who compleins is the latter.
Theres bound to be some offical art somewhere where the jacket is the exact same colour as yours. Most of the time shades of outfits vary so much in art so much you often just haft to go with what you find (one cotume I made this year had a range from bright purple to dark blue).

Yeah, just like the Karin cosplay I'm doing, I've seen so many different colors for her top. It ranges from white to a bluish purple so yeah...can't get that one wrong.

kuko-chan
07-25-2009, 01:10 PM
Theres accurate and then theres pedantic, anyone who compleins is the latter.
Theres bound to be some offical art somewhere where the jacket is the exact same colour as yours. Most of the time shades of outfits vary so much in art so much you often just haft to go with what you find (one cotume I made this year had a range from bright purple to dark blue).

True say. I had a Dynasty Warriors costume I was working on where the skirt had a dark green/mint green gradient, but the best I could find was a dark green/leaf green gradient in a lovely sari silk fabric. I'm sure no one would be carrying around a print-off of the costume to check cosplayers for accuracy.

jadis2narnia
07-25-2009, 01:29 PM
I agree with a lot of this.. For instance, there's always something about my costumes that isn't right or accurate.. Like my white witch of Narnia costume, I didn't have her icicle crown because I hate wearing such things like crowns/wigs upon my head.. It wasn't that worth it too me and I'm not going wear such just because the character wears it, either... Now, some people dislike/reject this costume just because I didn't have the ice crown.. that's their decision, but I'm happy with my costume regaurdless what they think of it..

and I've seen alot of costumes - most of them usually are flawed with the wrong color/design or have some accesories missing - but that doesn't make it a bad costume over all, especially if that person took the time to put some effort into making their costume and it shows..

but you shouldn't stress youself over your costume design, though.. have fun with it.. ^_^

~ jadis

Ruki Yuki
07-26-2009, 10:13 AM
True say. I had a Dynasty Warriors costume I was working on where the skirt had a dark green/mint green gradient, but the best I could find was a dark green/leaf green gradient in a lovely sari silk fabric. I'm sure no one would be carrying around a print-off of the costume to check cosplayers for accuracy.

That's cool x3 I love Dynasty Warriors. How did it turn out?

I agree with a lot of this.. For instance, there's always something about my costumes that isn't right or accurate.. Like my white witch of Narnia costume, I didn't have her icicle crown because I hate wearing such things like crowns/wigs upon my head.. It wasn't that worth it too me and I'm not going wear such just because the character wears it, either... Now, some people dislike/reject this costume just because I didn't have the ice crown.. that's their decision, but I'm happy with my costume regaurdless what they think of it..

~ jadis

That seems like it would be a..hardish costume to do o-o;

jadis2narnia
07-26-2009, 02:27 PM
The dress is fairly easy, it's the ice crown that holds all the difficulty, and yes, I have tried to make it without a wig, it is very hard to do and uncomfortable to wear.. O.o

~ jadis

kuko-chan
07-26-2009, 10:43 PM
That's cool x3 I love Dynasty Warriors. How did it turn out?
Actually quite well! I was dressed as Xing Cai!

Crusader_8
07-26-2009, 10:56 PM
It sounds cheesy, but the most important thing to do is set your own goals. Accuracy, recognition/attention, socializing, and fandom are all different reasons people cosplay, and not everyone shares the same reasons.

What is most important to you? is you want to be recognized, that should be the central theme during the entire process of making your cosplay. Sometimes people compromise detail and accuracy to achieve other goals, which no on should care about but you and jerks whom you SHOULDN'T care about. However, if you think accuracy is the most important, then set your own goals on what you feel is acceptable. The only person you can let down is yourself.

Example: I pretty much had help making/throwing together my original Link outfit, but I've been slowly improving it over the past 4 years for accuracy/detail reasons, even though the fun factor has never gone down.

Cosplay_Rose
07-26-2009, 11:50 PM
I enjoy seeing humanized versions of animals / Pokemon / creatures from time to time, and I most definitely prefer original ones. Gijinkas (or whatever they're called) are cute, but there's everywhere. I've done a casual / humanized Pikachu before, and it was fairly well-received. I was worried about my human-form Amaterasu as well, but the people that I know that have played it love it, and even those who haven't played it enjoy seeing it.

I think that if you put real time and effort into it, and base it around what you can do (for example, I can't sew, so my costume's held together with hot glue) and not just what you don't want to do (I took apart and re-made so many parts of my costume to make them look right, even though I really didn't want to), it should be well-received as well.

If you're worried about being recognized, you could incorporate a reference picture into your costume (a plushie or t-shirt design is most common), or find some other Final Fantasy cosplayers to hang out with.

Eau de Decus
07-27-2009, 12:03 AM
I was just wondering...I know its of some importance, but just how importance is costume accuracy?Accuracy to me is highly important, but that is my opinion and because, when it comes to my costumes, I'm determined to make it as accurate as I can (within my means of course), even if nobody but myself would know the difference. It's more of just to satisfy my own personality because I know if I shortcut something, it will bother me until I do it the way I know I should have. That's just me personally because that's how am I am with just about anything I do. It's rather annoying actually, heh.

I think accuracy is important to a point, but it is not everything. Work within your budget and your own ability. If something is out of your skill range or budget or otherwise, just improvise the best you know how. I wouldn't think anyone would fault you for having a less accurate costume. Well, some might, but never take those people to heart.


I think the most important thing is that YOU like your cosplay!I agree. If you like it and it is a costume you feel proud to wear, then wear it. That is all that truly matters in the end. If you're having fun with it, I see no reason to worry about it.

Ruki Yuki
07-31-2009, 12:28 PM
I'll have to try really hard to make sure its exactly what I wanted @o@

Natchan
07-31-2009, 12:35 PM
I think that as long as you get the costume as accurate as humanly possible (some are impossible to do accurately) then its fine.

I know that not all my costumes are 100% accurate. I'd kill myself trying on a couple of them.

Ruki Yuki
08-02-2009, 06:54 PM
Hmm..I guess I can always say it was inspired by the character e.e;

Crusader_8
08-02-2009, 08:44 PM
You know, if people complain about your accuracy then yes, pull a Hollywood and say your cosplay is "based on characters from the popular series" or "inspired by a true publication."

Shindou-kun
08-03-2009, 04:25 PM
I'd say that accuracy is important to a certain extent. (I mean...you don't want to do a "bathrobe with leopard-print ears Inuyasha.") But what it all comes down to is what YOU want. Some people are more anal than others about their costumes. Some people would rather do a concept cosplay for a certain character.

If you find that your costume isn't true to every, single nit-picky detail but you're happy with the outcome, then don't worry about it. Just have confidence and have fun. =)

flyingdog
08-03-2009, 05:07 PM
In my opinion, the "humanized" versions of Pokemon like Dragonite and Cubone were more effective than Pikachu in a full-sized suit. I saw a cosplayer dressed in an orange dress with blue wings, but they were easily recognizable as Dragonite. I prefer the humanized versions because they don't come off as clumsy. They're representing an animal--and most of them represent mobility, elegance, or grace. Waddling around in a giant Pikachu outfit takes away that grace. As for Carbuncle, that character floats around, right? I'd say go for the humanized version because it's more interpretive and a humanized version gives you a lot more freedom to move around--and in my opinion, a humanized Carbuncle would be more creative. ^^

Teh Pocky Ninja
08-06-2009, 04:17 PM
And THIS is exactly why most of my cosplays are simple (two-tone dresses, monochromatic kimonos, and one-color cloaks with simple designs.) Lord knows how Zelda is going to go, even without the super-microscopic embroidery on her bodice X_X (At least the designs on the bottom of the dress will be right...)

Stormraven24
08-06-2009, 05:37 PM
In general, I think accuracy is only as important as you make it. Personally, I (now) wouldn't want to go to a con in a cosplay that I feel is totally wrong (but I nitpick, so I'd probably notice the "defects" before anyone else), but that's only because I want to cosplay the characters/people I adore and it means a lot to me to get it as right as I can; it really doesn't matter in the long run. What matters is what you think of the cosplay. The good thing about cosplay itself is it leaves a lot of room for interpretation, especially if the character is always changing outfits and they tend to be elaborate (ex. Yuko from xxxHolic). Plus, inaccuracy can be used for humor (ex. the femme-Death Note group that was at Anime Mid Atlantic this year).

RadRage
08-06-2009, 06:31 PM
Accuracy is great but not urgently important if you are missing something little...especially on an intricate costume. If the costume is missing something big like a hat or something is on the wrong side (which isn't that big but if its an important characteristic of the costume than it may be) etc, then it becomes a little more important to pay attention to those things so that your cosplay doesn't seem halfassed.

I LURV
08-06-2009, 07:06 PM
Depends on your definition and use of accuracy. For example, if you wanted to wear <Insert character name here>'s robe because its so f***ing awesome then you can just tell people " I made it this way because it looks cool to me'.

A lot of inspiration comes from other peoples artwork, and if you want to expand/advance on their artwork to make it your own so be it. You have every right to. A lot of people put on akatsuki cloaks and run around town just because they love the cloak so much. So what they aren't 'trying' to cosplay A character? They are enjoying themselves.

Halloween, you dress up as something you like. You mix and match things to make it your own perfect suit.

Accuracy to your own imagination is important. Be accurate to what YOU want and what YOU like.

Crystalike
08-06-2009, 07:26 PM
Accuracy. No one is going to be 100% accurate because of body types and the way anime and video characters are drawn: as if they have no hips and are really thin. It's impossible, and especially for the characters with bigger boobs, no one will be 100% perfect. =/

That said: I try to make my costume look right by getting all the details, and making sure I look good in it too to match, but every person will have a different method or view of what materials a costume should be made out of, and that's why the same costumes from two different people turn out so different if you put them side by side.

KittyLuck
08-06-2009, 11:47 PM
It depends if its done purposely or not, like for instance if someone cosplays as chi but doesn't want to dye thier hair or wear a wig so they have brown hair. That is fine it was done on purpose and still looks great, but if a person does a half ass job on their costume and gets the outfit details wrong, like they didn't even bother, then I will be like ick!

In no way can I see what your describing as bad, provided you did a good job making it and as you say it looks cute =3 One year I saw a girl in a humanized version of a Moogle! you know those scimpy bunny outfits people wear at halloween and stuff??? yeah it was like a modified version of that, only instead of bunny it was moogle! and she did a REALLY good job of it. Like I wanted to buy it off her soooo bad!!!!

Pure Ratchet
08-07-2009, 12:02 AM
I'll try to make the most accurate cosplay. I'm just a perfectionist like that. :crest:

flyingdog
08-07-2009, 12:17 AM
Accuracy for the outfit itself: no. If Alucard was wearing a purple coat I wouldn't really care. If Naruto had green hair it really wouldn't matter. If Cloud is missing his Buster Sword or three feet tall, who cares? As for cosplayers who don't supposedly fit the cosplay--(too broad, too scrawny, etc), if that's the character they want to cosplay, then it's good that they go for it. As long as they put some effort into it and it's not a repeat of The Man Faye. ^^;

I saw a really good King Bradley with gray hair--does it matter that he has gray hair instead of black hair? No, he was just a friggin' AWESOME King Bradley. He even looked imposing and aloof, too--which brings me to the only accuracy that matters to me: characterization. It would be pretty unsettling to see, hypothetically, a Luffy cosplayer completely smashed, throwing up, and so on. It's one thing if you have a really good costume, but it brings stars to my eyes when I see a Gluttony just lumbering around, a Lust skulking, looking intimidating, etc., whether they land in the sights of a camera or not. It's as if the line between this world and the other one dissolved, making the experience of the con transcendent. *_*

Seeshelle
08-07-2009, 04:15 PM
If the color of some part of the cosplay is wrong, is it alright for it to be like that?
For ex., my K-On! cosplay's skirt is black, but in the show or manga it's grey/blue.

ShadowYin-Yang
08-10-2009, 11:07 PM
It depends on the person and it always will. Some people are so picky that they may look down on cosplays that arne't as good as there's.

But some people can't afford all the materials needed like a wig and some people just arne't a perfectionist as others. It really does depend on the person. Whether they are making it or seeing them.

Myself, I always want to be as accurate as possible but in the end, I get lazy or frustrated so I don't fix it. BUT I will always fix the costume in the future to get it close(unless it's like the angle of a pocket b/c then I'll have to make the whole outfit over which I won't>.<).

And people learn from their mistakes. Everyone kinda starts with an okay-costume that's not really accurate but I believe everyone has the ability to get the point when their costumes are nearly a 100 percent accurate.

Axelai
08-11-2009, 04:53 PM
Honestly, i go for more comfortable than TOTALLY accurate. Like, the Team Rocket Grunt outfit i made. I didn't go for making sure the dress was perfect, i got a normal sweater material comfy dress and wore that, even if the bottom didn't quite look right. And maybe my belt wasn't perfect, but the real belt would be unrealistic to make.

Just depends. I mean, my friend cosplayed Misty from pokemon and wore ACTUAL shorts instead of totally accurate ones. :o

Musicalpencil
08-17-2009, 01:19 AM
I try to be as accurate as possible, but there are some things you just can't help. Like if you're short on time; trying to make it accurate is out of your league; it's not comfortable; or if it just plain defies the laws of physics.
I feel the more accurate the better, but you do what you can to make it work for you.

KakeraのTsuki
08-17-2009, 09:01 AM
To hell with comfort, Accuracy all the way~ Money, however, is an issue. e__e

but then, refs are usually inconsistent anyways, so there's always a little wiggle room.

Dante666
08-17-2009, 09:54 AM
I find that if it's close enough that it really doesn't matter, i've only cosplayed a few times, but most people will recognize a good outfit if they see it

flyingdog
08-17-2009, 08:53 PM
Like, the Team Rocket Grunt outfit i made.

Awesome. ^_^ I love Team Rocket cosplayers. ^^

Some cosplayers dress differently from the character on purpose to highlight a certain aspect of the character's personality, and that kind of approach is really creative.

SelfSovereign
08-24-2009, 01:36 AM
Not to beat the horse further about the accuracy issue, I do believe there's quite a bit of Artistic License involved with cosplay. Also, unless you're in a business for cosplay most people participate for the joy of it; it's satisfying to have others appreciate the work you did to bring life to an animated character because they share similar interests, whether it's in costuming or the anime it came from and so forth.

There are always instances in which a costume cannot be replicated exactly. These are the most abundant when it comes to Artistic License.
What I mean by this is these are the outfits in which you must decide on your own details and interpretations because it's unlikely you'll be able to manage a high amount of accuracy.

For example, I'm currently working on a Human form Amaterasu from Okami, and other than a few small images in an artbook (which I've not had the chance to see) there's no actual record of her true human form, it's only implied. Therefore the entire outfit will be something that wasn't actually in the game, but regardless will be recognizable. That's the idea of accuracy in my opinion. If someone else-- even if it takes an otaku to see it-- can recognize your outfit properly, I say it's accurate enough.

As long as you enjoyed doing it, how can you go wrong?

Moonsong
08-24-2009, 08:43 AM
I think accuracy is important, but not to the extent that I get OCD about it. While some people forgo comfort for accuracy, I do the opposite. I'm on my feet 8+ hours a day at a con, and I want to be as comfortable as possible. When it comes to creating costumes, I completely agree with the above poster. If you're having fun, it shouldn't matter. Enjoy your cosplay, accurate or not.