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View Full Version : Best material for sword


hayashiox
08-03-2009, 04:14 PM
Wood is the only material i can think of.. I don't have any tools at this time.

It has to be able to wack someone, light weight, and great for high detail carving. And also cheap.

o01101011
08-03-2009, 04:58 PM
Wood is pretty much your only option if you want to be able to hit someone/something with it

Sirblood
08-03-2009, 10:19 PM
You can get plexiglass that is fairly thick. It's less likely to break than wood, but you have to be a little careful with it as it will scrach fairly easy depending on what tools you are using on it. You can use wood working tools to shape it just like it was a piece of wood. If it gets too hot while you are sanding it, it will warp somewhat.

You will have to make sure the tip is very blunt!

The problem is, lightweight does not allow you to reinforce it and without reinforcement its going to break. In general wood's not all that light... pick up a 10 pound piece and carry it around for an hour outside... now imagine carrying it around all day...

jdp898989
08-03-2009, 10:22 PM
You could also try foam with fiberglass for strength. I'm not sure how easy/hard that is for high detail carving though. My guess is way harder than wood.

hayashiox
08-03-2009, 11:20 PM
You could also try foam with fiberglass for strength. I'm not sure how easy/hard that is for high detail carving though. My guess is way harder than wood.

I tried that. Fiberglass and Spackling Compounds is strong, but No good for wacking people.

i was actually aiming for a 30 $ budget

hayashiox
08-03-2009, 11:28 PM
You can get plexiglass that is fairly thick. It's less likely to break than wood, but you have to be a little careful with it as it will scrach fairly easy depending on what tools you are using on it. You can use wood working tools to shape it just like it was a piece of wood. If it gets too hot while you are sanding it, it will warp somewhat.

You will have to make sure the tip is very blunt!

The problem is, lightweight does not allow you to reinforce it and without reinforcement its going to break. In general wood's not all that light... pick up a 10 pound piece and carry it around for an hour outside... now imagine carrying it around all day...

Thanks, but my budget is under 30. Plexiglass can get expensive. I did a experience while ago i used wood filler on top of foam as a hard coat. It actually works, but time consuming to cover the whole thing.

Forget balsa wood, that stuff is expensive at stores here and fragile, but very light.
I have to visit home depot some day

at 405th forum some guy made their halo gun from poplar
i dont know if thats light

Chergnomebyl
08-04-2009, 08:07 AM
I would go with foam and cardboard or something. At the moment I'm making God of War blades for some guy and they're sturdy enough to wack someone and not bend.
:]

o01101011
08-04-2009, 11:28 AM
There is no way you can have a durable, light, and cheap blade. You will need to sacrifice one of those components to meet your goal.

hayashiox
08-04-2009, 01:14 PM
There is no way you can have a durable, light, and cheap blade. You will need to sacrifice one of those components to meet your goal.

Power tools are ridiculous expensive, but i want to take this challenge without using any tool and do it under 30 budget.


My option is foam with some lightweight hard board and Spackling Compounds.

o01101011
08-04-2009, 02:32 PM
.........yes, that really is your only option unless you take the cardboard route.

Under $30, no tools, cheap, able to hit someone, and light. It isn't going to happen without the blade breaking unless all you do it tap someone with the sword.

Good luck with such a hopeless sounding project.

NekoMimiChan
08-04-2009, 02:43 PM
Unfortunately o01101011 is correct. The components your looking for: lightweight, durable, under $30, highly detaield, without tools don't go together well. Only a few extremely skilled people can make good props on a limited budget.

I always suggest wood ('cause that's what I use, I'm biased) because it is very sturdy. It can get heavy, but that's the trade off.

You can get creative in finding materials and tools. You can check out construction sites to salvage wood, just ASK PERMISSION first. Lots of people have scrap wood laying around that would work for a small sword or prop project. You can make friends with family or neighbors with tools and experience and have them help you learn to use them.

Also, what exactly are you making anyway? Maybe if we had some specific references we can give you a little more guidance.

hayashiox
08-04-2009, 03:48 PM
Unfortunately o01101011 is correct. The components your looking for: lightweight, durable, under $30, highly detaield, without tools don't go together well. Only a few extremely skilled people can make good props on a limited budget.

I always suggest wood ('cause that's what I use, I'm biased) because it is very sturdy. It can get heavy, but that's the trade off.

You can get creative in finding materials and tools. You can check out construction sites to salvage wood, just ASK PERMISSION first. Lots of people have scrap wood laying around that would work for a small sword or prop project. You can make friends with family or neighbors with tools and experience and have them help you learn to use them.

Also, what exactly are you making anyway? Maybe if we had some specific references we can give you a little more guidance.

http://www.innovativecardboard.com/ (http://www.innovativecardboard.com/)

hayashiox
08-04-2009, 09:23 PM
Unfortunately o01101011 is correct. The components your looking for: lightweight, durable, under $30, highly detaield, without tools don't go together well. Only a few extremely skilled people can make good props on a limited budget.

I always suggest wood ('cause that's what I use, I'm biased) because it is very sturdy. It can get heavy, but that's the trade off.

You can get creative in finding materials and tools. You can check out construction sites to salvage wood, just ASK PERMISSION first. Lots of people have scrap wood laying around that would work for a small sword or prop project. You can make friends with family or neighbors with tools and experience and have them help you learn to use them.

Also, what exactly are you making anyway? Maybe if we had some specific references we can give you a little more guidance.

Ok fine what kind of wood do you recommend for a 2 inch thickness sword? Im not going to post my designs but is similar to the left.

http://www.hugewallpaper.com/data/media/78/wallpaper_prince_of_persia_warrior_within_10_1600. jpg


but i want to do the cardboard and foam version also

alcott
08-05-2009, 02:48 PM
there was a really good cardboard sword tutorial floating around here a while ago -- this was the link for it (http://www.cosplay.com/showthread.php?t=76828)!

what this guy does is he reinforces layered cardboard by running a 3/8" dowel through the middle of it -- and from the pictures that you're producing, making a curved blade should be easy if you follow the tutorial! i'm currently making a straight blade with his tutorial right now, and it's cost me about $25 so far for a hot glue gun, glue sticks, an exacto knife and gesso. i'm really happy with the results for something so cheap

as far as details go, you'd probably be able to do some work with applying more/carving into the hot glue -- if you check out featherweight's gallery, he manages to get some pretty sick stuff out of it!

just a suggestion

hayashiox
08-05-2009, 03:46 PM
there was a really good cardboard sword tutorial floating around here a while ago -- this was the link for it (http://www.cosplay.com/showthread.php?t=76828)!

what this guy does is he reinforces layered cardboard by running a 3/8" dowel through the middle of it -- and from the pictures that you're producing, making a curved blade should be easy if you follow the tutorial! i'm currently making a straight blade with his tutorial right now, and it's cost me about $25 so far for a hot glue gun, glue sticks, an exacto knife and gesso. i'm really happy with the results for something so cheap

as far as details go, you'd probably be able to do some work with applying more/carving into the hot glue -- if you check out featherweight's gallery, he manages to get some pretty sick stuff out of it!

just a suggestion

HA

I found a picture that look cool on google so i clicked it inked to his profile. Im amaze what you can do with cardboard.

hayashiox
08-05-2009, 03:47 PM
there was a really good cardboard sword tutorial floating around here a while ago -- this was the link for it (http://www.cosplay.com/showthread.php?t=76828)!

what this guy does is he reinforces layered cardboard by running a 3/8" dowel through the middle of it -- and from the pictures that you're producing, making a curved blade should be easy if you follow the tutorial! i'm currently making a straight blade with his tutorial right now, and it's cost me about $25 so far for a hot glue gun, glue sticks, an exacto knife and gesso. i'm really happy with the results for something so cheap

as far as details go, you'd probably be able to do some work with applying more/carving into the hot glue -- if you check out featherweight's gallery, he manages to get some pretty sick stuff out of it!

just a suggestion

HA

I found a picture in morning that look cool on google so i clicked it inked to his profile. Im amaze what you can do with cardboard.