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Saturday Person
06-25-2010, 03:52 AM
Just having finished my first year at University, I also just picked up my camera for the first time in almost a year. The pictures from my Anime North photoshoots that I came out with, while alright, feel stale to me, but I'm also having trouble figuring out how to improve upon them. A sort of photographer's writer's block.

Maybe I just need more practice.

In any case, I would absolutely love it, and fully appreciate it, if I could get some feedback on a few pictures that I took. I'm going to pull the two I'm the happiest with and the two I'm the least happiest with. Go wild. : ) I can take it.

(And note, I was working with purely available con and outdoor night lighting, which is the reason for a bit of noise in some photos. Workin' on getting excess lighting.)

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2602384/

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2602380/

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2602382/

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2602383/

I'd particularly enjoy hearing: how to turn these pictures from passable to interesting, and also some tips on full body shots. I am TERRIBLE with full body shots, a complete and total torso shooter; I find full bodies compositionally terrifying. No idea why.

In any case, thank you! : )

FiveRings
07-12-2010, 05:05 PM
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2602384/
This one's nice. I would've liked to see her raised a bit into the frame so that her face is higher up and the crosses aren't so far at the edge of the frame. The overhead lighting gives her a bit of a raccoon-eyed look which can be difficult to deal with when working with available light.
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2602380/Not sure how I feel about this one. Maybe if you had the cosplayer take a step back so she wasn't directly under the light, you could've gotten more light on her face. The cropping of the right arm seems a bit odd to me.
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2602382/Again, there's a bit of raccoon-eyes going on. I'm guessing you couldn't get far back enough to frame her without having to shoot very wide angle on your lens, which distorts your lines. This is just a pet peeve of mine, but the horizontal line is not even, which further distorts the picture frame. I'd like to see her interact more with that frame. (looking at it, leaning on it, touching it). As it is, the frame might as well not be there and might just be distracting from her.
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2602383/The ears kind of get lost as one is cut off and one is too dark to see. It's a nice shot overall. Watch for the light falling on her nose as it makes that much brighter than the rest of her face and draws attention away from the eyes. Looks like you were still a bit on the wide side on your lens, prob 18-22mm or so. Should be taken in the 30-50mm range
I'd particularly enjoy hearing: how to turn these pictures from passable to interesting, and also some tips on full body shots. I am TERRIBLE with full body shots, a complete and total torso shooter; I find full bodies compositionally terrifying. No idea why.

In any case, thank you! : )Full body shots are indeed difficult to compose because you need the model to do something compelling. You can make them do action shots so that you get some flowing movement. You can also make them interact with the environment in some way. (leaning against a wall or tree, touching a railing, coming around a corner) You can try shooting them from an exaggerated angle; either very high or very low.

Good luck and hope to see more! :)

SeizetsuKenSeie
08-02-2010, 02:12 PM
Lighting aside, I have a few suggestions; in the first and third shot, it looks like you were going for symmetry in the background, but you didn't quite get it because of the angle of the camera. I would be very mindful of the lines in the background, especially that picture frame, and make sure they look straight. They are not tilted enough to look intensional, it just looks like your head was a little crooked. :O You might want to try a tri-pod or holding the camera with your elbows close to your body to stabilize your arms.

My next suggestion is, if you have a digital camera, take LOTS of pictures. Since you don't have to worry about film, snap away. You can sort through the photos later and pick out the perfect ones, but get as many shots to work with as your model will sit for. :D