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luffyatemyfruit
06-27-2011, 07:42 PM
I've (somewhat) recently did a photoshoot with some friends that cosplay. I took the pictures. It was my first cosplay photoshoot and was wondering what some other people think of how I'm doing so far. I'm rather new at this and hope to get better. They're cosplaying from the anime Axis Powers Hetalia.

Thankyou. :)

P.S.
Here (http://www.flickr.com/photos/erin-jean/sets/72157627063969416/) are a few more

Sufida
06-29-2011, 01:10 AM
Some good ideas here. What kind of equipment did you use by the way?

Anyway here are my initial thoughts

austhinking.jpg
The model looks good particularly with the tree in the background, but feels too "centered".. maybe that is just me. I would of had her more to the left.

Also her hand being clipped in half at the bottom and on a rare occasion this is fine, but because it is dead center it draws even more attention to itself.

The lighting could also be a little better because on the left side her outfit looks black and the right side it looks blue. She also kind of blends into the tree a bit

den2.jpg
This is pretty good. I don't see any obvious problems here.

prusaus2.jpg
I like the perspective and angle with the bridge. The lighting could be better, but that is something you can get better with experience. Also I would like to see some of the face of the white haired person as he looks a little menacing from behind. The expression on the female can also be a little better as she doesn't seem she is conveying any emotion outside of posing.

--

On top of all this I noticed all the images carry random resolutions and the aspect ratios don't seem to match. I am not sure if this was due to you uploading them on cosplay.com though. When resizing your photos try to keep the size consistent unless you are using it for a collage or doing something really artistic. This also goes for the aspect ratio. When cropping your photos keep the aspect ratio as presented in the original file (which can usually be done by holding shift when dragging the crop box).

Other than that it is not bad for a start.
Some of the others ones are actually pretty good.
Particularly untitled, Austria, and sweden.

luffyatemyfruit
06-29-2011, 09:10 PM
@Sufida
I was using a Nikon D3000 with the regular 18mm-55mm. I'm thinking of getting an external flash, do you think that would help? Or would something else work better? I really need to work on portraits, my nature photography isn't that bad though.
Thanks for the critique. Now that I'm looking back at my pictures, I do see what you mean. Especially with austhinking photo. With prusaus, I know the light isn't too good. It seems a bit bright on the crowns of their heads.
Yeah, the photos are pretty random because I had to get them 200kb or under.
Thanks a lot for the feedback though, I'll take this all and put it into my photography. ^ ^
By Untitled, did you mean this one (http://www.flickr.com/photos/erin-jean/5879109768/in/set-72157627063969416)?

Sufida
07-01-2011, 05:24 PM
@Sufida
By Untitled, did you mean this one (http://www.flickr.com/photos/erin-jean/5879109768/in/set-72157627063969416)?


Yes.

and lighting is a tricky thing. You could try a cheap external flash (I got mine for around $60), a reflector disc, or simply just moving around. Messing with the iso settings or exposure (this could even be done in PS) could give you some interesting results, but probably not really recommended.

luffyatemyfruit
07-02-2011, 08:22 PM
Yes.

and lighting is a tricky thing. You could try a cheap external flash (I got mine for around $60), a reflector disc, or simply just moving around. Messing with the iso settings or exposure (this could even be done in PS) could give you some interesting results, but probably not really recommended.

Alright, awesome. I'll experiment with what you mentioned and see what it does.

Mnguyen8097
07-08-2011, 03:01 PM
The first picture, Austhinking, has a overblown background and underxposed foreground. In these situations, you want to use a flash, preferrably an external one, to fill in your foreground subjects, while metering properly for the background. However, if you don't want to use a flash, it is usually better to expose your subjects properly and have an extremely overblown background (1 out of 2 ain't bad right?)

The second picture looks really good, though there is some detail loss in the shadows. On a technical level it would be better if those lost details were recovered, such as through use of "Fill Light" or increasing exposure in the RAW editor. However, on an artistic level, I think this photo looks really good the way it is. Good pose, good attitude, interesting angle.

The third picture is rather... boring. Looks like a snapshot with a point and shoot. It's not particularly interesting in any way. Perhaps retry this scene as a close up?