PDA

View Full Version : Steampunk do's and don'ts


Tiny-teenie
08-22-2008, 12:52 AM
I think this is the right place to put this, if not I will happily move it to the correct thread.

Anyway, my friends and I are looking to do a Steampunk cosplay at Anime LA 08 or Anime Expo 09. We are four girls and I do believe two of them wish to cosplay as males.

I was wondering if there are any specific do's and don'ts to Steampunk, what would be proper to wear/accessorise with and what wouldn't.

If I could get some advice, I would be very grateful.

Thanks for your time guys. :D

o01101011
08-22-2008, 01:00 AM
Get the period clothing right. Clearly because of the fiction there are some things that can be tweaked, but the base design should be victorian/old western/19th century.

Mangochutney
08-22-2008, 01:37 AM
If your choice is between something that is a gear and something that is not a gear, it is your moral duty as a steamer to pick the gear every time. For reals.

Tiny-teenie
08-22-2008, 02:00 AM
If your choice is between something that is a gear and something that is not a gear, it is your moral duty as a steamer to pick the gear every time. For reals.

I am very new to the steampunk cosplay idea. Could you please define what you mean by gear. I've seen pictures of steampunk with things such as cogs sewn on to hats. Is that what you mean? Or all the accessories such as goggles, and nifty mechanical gadgets?
Thanks :D

Mangochutney
08-22-2008, 10:45 AM
Eh, that was mostly me being a smartass. You've noticed that the aesthetic has a distinctly mechanical component, which is what I'm getting at. Figuring out how to incorporate low-tech machinery into things that normally wouldn't have it (like boots) is one of my favorite parts of steampunk.

(nearly all of it should be tarnished, by the way. Brass gets to be shiny, but only if it looks like it's been tarnished THEN polished. :D Aging and weathering techniques are crucial.)

Pocketfightr
08-22-2008, 11:43 AM
If you have a livejournal, I would totally suggest you check out the Steamfashion community. They're pretty helpful in offering ideas and people are always linking cute accessories they find in stores.

Otherwise, o01101011 pretty much nailed down the description. Start with something Victorian and find creative ways to embellish it with steamy accessories.

Tiny-teenie
08-22-2008, 01:43 PM
Thank you all so much for your help. You guys are great.
Pocketfightr, thank you for the livejournal tip. I will definitely check that out.
Mangochutney, thanks for all your tips, I will definetly add low-tech machinery to what I can :D
o01101011, thanks for giving me the time periods too look into.

Thank you again :D

TechieCL
08-22-2008, 08:29 PM
My advice would be don't get too wrapped up in "Is it Steampunk or not?" Define it too rigidly and you loose your artistic license. Not every idea has to be some adventuring Victorian Brit. There's the "Weird" West (i.e cowboys). There's Chinese/Eastern influences you can bring in. Brown and brass are good colors, but there's other palletes and shades that can be made to work.

Think anchronistic technology - modern concepts with past technology. Functionality, every bit and do-dad should look like it has a reason for being there (whether it actually works doesn't matter).

DivineSage
08-22-2008, 10:02 PM
Check out the webcomic Girl Genius: http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php

It's a great storyline with lots of Steampunk-y goodness.

Nachoman
08-23-2008, 02:02 AM
Continuing from TechieCL's idea, I could point out that you might not even have to go all the way to the steam era to get unreal.
Most science-fiction from the 19th century deal with steam-driven behemoths doing big stuff that people would do small. Also remember that electricity and magnetism was a known factor throughout the 19th century, so much that the earliest reference I can find to a Matrix-type direct brain-machine interphase dates back from the 1850's or so. Full autonomous robots are also present (and some revolt), not to mention that Frankenstein, which many point as the beginning of Scifi, was published in 1818.
Turn-of-the-century Scifi tended to center on city life gone mainstream. The main idea was that cities were eternal and would be the ultimate creation of man-kind. Some stories center, though, on the fact that our cities will outlive mankind. The first megalopolis were predicted and even cities in the sky, based on never-resting Zeppelins.
Warfare, by the way, was still concieved completely as old-tactics with new weapons. HG Wells imagined tanks as ships-out-of-water, steaming accross the landscape under strict naval tactics. Similarly with much previous authors, writing about Zeppelins being manouvered into broadside tactics, or three-layered infantry lines flying in formation as they prepare a synchronized shot.
1910's Scifi centers on flight: colossal Zeppelins, flapping-wing flying hotels, mid-ocean floating airports. Few seemed to have ever heard of the Wright brothers, though.
1920's Scifi continues on transportation, although now on all kinds of transportation: elevated monorails, rotor boats (for oceanic travel), near-supersonic cars commuting from London to Moscow via multiple tunnels. Airplanes were still seen like flying boats, but at least they were now illustrated like feasible flying machines.
1930`s Scifi was hopeful for a bright future for everybody; a natural position if you consider that everybody thought that a big war was looming ahead. The mass transportation from the 20's landed into colossal highways, and cities as gleaming silver towers surrounded by tame forests. Other visions from the era even go as far as to go into a Roman-like golden age full with personal helicopters and antigrav cars.
1940's Scifi begins the Atomic age. Near-omnipotence is at hand, for better or worse.

If you want to see things on these, try watching "Captain Sky and the World of Tomorrow": it's supposed to be based on the 1950's pulp fiction, but its vision dates back to turn of the century. If you wanted to try earlier fashions, prepare for the idea that a lady is a useless piece of decoration that needs to be rescued from her own stupidity(any task requiring thought is unladylike), and a gentleman always wears white shirt, tie and coat regardless of the ocassion, even if he is testing his new time machine or has to visit a mining operation in the middle of the Sahara. If protection equipment require more than to cover his eyes with googles or his ears with protection, then the task is ungentlemanly.

Take care.

DivineSage
08-23-2008, 04:02 AM
The general idea of Steampunk is adventure. It's typically Victorian-based clothing, but altered to be more adventurous and imaginative. It's really about innovation, so Nachoman's sci-fi suggestion is is a good place to start. If you really want to get into it, read the literature. Many Steampunkers will recommend the works of Jules Verne (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea; Journey to the Center of the Earth) and H. G. Wells (The Time Machine). I'd also recommend Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (as Nachoman did) and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

But really, the most important component of Steampunk is imagination, so just keep that in mind when you're creating your outfit. Make it whatever you want it to be, don't worry about adhering to rules or guidelines.

questionablekri
08-23-2008, 04:32 AM
A good place for ideas for steampunk help/ideas/etc would be this forum: http://www.brassgoggles.co.uk/bg-forum/index.php (specifically the tactile and anatomical boards.)

also, steampunk magazine has lots of good articles as well. not to mention patterns for steampunk suitable clothing and accessories including spats, aviators cap, artisan apron, etc. http://www.steampunkmagazine.com/inside/downloads/

Also, for steampunk costumes I've found it's better to have an idea of what kind of character you want before you put something together because sometimes things don't work for certain characters and having too much can end up looking miss-mashy. Ex: goggles work more for the mechanics/airship captains/etc because they'd be a necessy and functional piece whereas they'd just look random on a more upperclass/aristocrat character. (unless you were some upperclass airship captain or something.)

Moon_Fish
08-23-2008, 08:27 PM
Think of means of generating power besides electricity if you decide to carry a weapon for a prop. Hand cranks, turn keys/winders, copper tubbing and fake 'steam tanks' too. Wood is always good too and bolts and gears can be made into accesories as well. I also noticed goggles on top hats or safari helmets.

Nachoman
08-24-2008, 12:35 AM
Freezerburn:
I repeat: electricity was a known factor. If you look hard enough, you can even find on Internet the electrical data sheets concerning the Titanic's electrical instalation.
You do raise a very good point, though, so I would rather recommend carrying stuff like blue-vitrol batteries or maybe even stripping out a zinc-carbon battery pack and making it work from inside glass vials.

Everlette
08-24-2008, 11:32 PM
Freezerburn:
I repeat: electricity was a known factor. If you look hard enough, you can even find on Internet the electrical data sheets concerning the Titanic's electrical instalation.
You do raise a very good point, though, so I would rather recommend carrying stuff like blue-vitrol batteries or maybe even stripping out a zinc-carbon battery pack and making it work from inside glass vials.

I like to see different means of power in steampunk props and costumes, but thats just me. The hand crank like Freezerburn suggested would be cool on a prop, especially if it was functional.

prototype138
08-25-2008, 07:57 AM
I like to see different means of power in steampunk props and costumes, but thats just me. The hand crank like Freezerburn suggested would be cool on a prop, especially if it was functional.

Handcranked magnetic generator? Or, far better, a cog and pulley system, strapped to the back.

paper cosplay
08-25-2008, 11:54 AM
I resently found an old portible trasiter radio at a good will. the device is rapped in a lether carrying case. oviously trasiters are not steam punk but I like the out ward aperaince of the device several large dials and botans if I removed the radio markings. do you think it could work as a steam tech device or is it still to new.

Mangochutney
08-25-2008, 12:35 PM
It's leather, it's got dials and gauges. Go for it.

It's "transistors", by the way.

prototype138
08-25-2008, 12:44 PM
I resently found an old portible trasiter radio at a good will. the device is rapped in a lether carrying case. oviously trasiters are not steam punk but I like the out ward aperaince of the device several large dials and botans if I removed the radio markings. do you think it could work as a steam tech device or is it still to new.

You can also do some fairly simple modifications to further 'low-tech' it.
Try attaching a few old vaccuum tubes out of a junk tube amp. By cutting the leather case so that you can glue the tubes to the radio without the glue showing, you can disguise the fact that it's a transistor radio.

paper cosplay
11-07-2008, 12:31 PM
heres my newest steam punk costume I'm trying out new googles and the radio
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1794146/
close up
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1795093/

I'm looking for any suggestions for add-ons to go more steampunk

Nachoman
11-07-2008, 03:50 PM
Looking cool so far.
You want a few suggestions?

Props:
(*) A box-shaped leather or canvas backpack, or a bucket-shaped wicker one. Eliminate all zippers and replace them with buttons, ties and buckles. Add a few additional straps for tying shovels, pikes and a bedroll. Also eliminate any colour not between cream and brown (except black) unless you can fade it badly: while many bright colours could be achieved even before Napoleon, it was better if your reds and blues stayed out of the rain.
(*) If you carry a shovel or a pike, make sure they look completely like "metal on wood", then strip away any paint on them. Also remember they are supposed to be solid, so no Second-World-War fold-away shovels.
(*) a cast-iron frying pan, a small pot or even a small Dutch over, dangling outside your backpack. Even a brass or copper kettle, but whatever you carry, make it look used.
(*) A bow tie or a ribbon tie. Make sure the material is not shiny or eye-catching.
(*) A canteen and/or a hip-flask. Metal or leather, although the hip flask could be glass. The canteen has to have a shoulder strap rather than a belt buckle.
(*) A bellows-type camera. No need to exaggerate there: even I have a hand-held bellows camera that's as "huge" as a late-series Harry Potter paperback.
(*) A napkin, tied around your neck inside your shirt's collar. Cotton or wool, and kept damp if the weather's hot. If it is silk or something otherwise shiny, keep it folded and peeking out of your coat's front pocket. Regardless of its material, its colour should contrast with the shirt and coat, yet not be particularly eye-catching.

Make up and personal appearance:
(*) Do Not loose a single ounce. If anything, gain a pound or two. Without facial hair, you look like the perfect chubby sidekick.
(*) If you go for any makeup (general dirt, road grime, coal dust, coal smoke, sun burns, tool-shop grease), better make sure it is spray on and wear your googles while you are being "soiled": that should leave beautiful google marks on your face. Also make sure your cap and clothes get some.
(*) No matter how tired, bedridden or agitated you might want to appear, ALWAYS be perfectly shaved, or otherwise keep a perfectly groomed, discreet mustache. A gentleman is never in such a hurry as to be seen looking like a savage. Besides, those were times of straight razors, so while a cut or two could be acceptable, a "5 o'clock" shadow would not be. (Consider shaving twice a day for your event.)

If I think of anything else, I'll post it.

MPsy
12-05-2008, 12:01 AM
As it has already been pointed out steampunk is a very forgiving genre to cosplay. Just keep in mind that steampunk is before WWII once you hit the WWII era you're sorta in dieselpunk territory. Other then that steampunk is whatever brass and steam dream you can conjure up.

Franky_star
02-02-2009, 10:48 AM
heres my newest steam punk costume I'm trying out new googles and the radio
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1794146/
close up
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1795093/

I'm looking for any suggestions for add-ons to go more steampunk

I would say you need to have some kind of tie around your neck. It can just be a simple scarf/bandana deal, or a full out ascot but that would be a great place to drop in a little detail.

I love the hat. X3

Ama Uzume
02-03-2009, 07:02 PM
Okay,

What about female stempunk? Can someone give me the guidelines for girls? I'm thinking of making a captain stempunk. Do I follow the rules of Victorian times or only use them as a guideline?

Nandra
02-03-2009, 07:20 PM
Everyone seems to be coming up with really great tips so far, so I'll just add this: Take a look at the website Brassgoggles (http://brassgoggles.co.uk/brassgoggles/). In addition to having an awesome blog, it has really wonderful, active forums for all divisions of steampunk - clothing, machinery, etc. They're also just about the friendliest online community I've ever come across, and I'm sure they'd be glad to lend you a hand.

Oh, and people are always posting pics of their creations, so it's great to browse for inspiration. ^^

phaedrus
02-03-2009, 07:33 PM
Please
Please
Please

Don't let Steampunk turn into EGL.

TechieCL
02-05-2009, 11:53 AM
Please
Please
Please

Don't let Steampunk turn into EGL.

Amen! I thought I would scream at a con after seeing dozens of the same repainted N-Strike Maverick Nerf Gun and Victorian English clothing.

You can do great things by inserting some ethnicity into your costume like these gals: http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1844078/
and my own work in progress http://www.cosplay.com/costume/172300/

Ama Uzume
02-05-2009, 06:22 PM
Hey,

If anyone wants to check out some steam punk artwork and scents, go to the Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab (http://www.blackphoenixalchemylab.com/steamworks.html). Their Steamworks collection looks cool.

hypersapiens
02-05-2009, 08:38 PM
There are so many stylistic influences and so many wildly creative people involved in the steampunk style now that it would be a shame to try to put restrictions on it... But, I would like to share some of the best general advice I've gotten from local S/P veterans regarding materials for use in costumes and props. In general, they suggested that the materials used in steampunk costuming should be more organic, pre-plastics age, such as: leather, canvas, silk, wool, taffeta, cotton, linen, wood, and all those lovely metals (especially those which hold a nice patina such as brass, copper & silver).
Materials which would not be considered steampunk would include things made of plastic, rubber, vinyl, silicon (these take you more into the cyberpunk style), also artificial fabrics like rayon and polyesters.

My favorite visual archive (a real treasure trove for ideas on everything steampunk) are the steampunk groups on flickr.

For example:
Steampunk fashion - http://www.flickr.com/groups/steampunkfashion/
Steampunk gear - http://www.flickr.com/groups/steampunkgear/
And just Steampunk in general: http://www.flickr.com/groups/steampunk/

darkbhudda
02-05-2009, 09:17 PM
Keep your eyes out for things that can easily be converted. I managed to pick up a couple of $1 toy space guns. With some coats of paint, and a couple of glowsticks, they look very steampunk. Also picked up a second hand leather toolbelt for a couple of dollars and changed that into a gun holster. Top hat, wild west shirt (with old fashioned brass and silver patterned stripes) , cravat and couple of rayguns and you have a well dressed cowboy going to a fancy shindig. You can just see a bit of the outfit and my beloved shirt in my avatar.

I've got a AUD$5 cane I bought at the markets, chopped the head off and am going to put different heads on for different characters. Seen some people with a bit of old pipe painted up and used that as a cane.

Accessories are what sets you apart from just being period. Brown leathers and brass metals will look great, but don't let that stop you going with silver metal or black leather or any colour either. Silver works better for my Oriental steampunk characters. Plan on doing a white leather and gold metal scheme later in the year.

Even small cogs glued on to something, eg arm band, will give a bit of a pizzazz.

You can get really cheap pocket watches off ebay which have clockwork-like appearances
or lovely filigree that wouldn'be be out of place in the 19th century.

Seen some cheap watches at the markets too with heraldry and clockwork designs.

Grow some muttonchops. ;)




You can do great things by inserting some ethnicity into your costume like these gals: http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1844078/
and my own work in progress http://www.cosplay.com/costume/172300/

Thanks for those photos. I've been looking for Eastern inspired steampunk for a while now since that's what I'm currently working on. I was beginning to think I was the only one.
The only problem I've got is too many options. Working on my Chinese top hat this weekend, but also found a great Chinese old style hat which I'm going to experiment with. So many options. I found a medieval style tunic that can work for Russian or Turkish as well, and with a small change Chinese or Mongolian. But I've also got a great Chinese shirt I'm turning into a waiscoat and with the top hat will look great.

RogueMimzy
08-04-2009, 12:43 AM
Alright, now that I've had a bunch of my original questions answered by this thread, on to specifics!

I have fallen desperately in love with Steampunk... but I want to make sure I'm doing it right. Like others have said, making the clothing accurate to the period itself will make an outfit stand out more. So, I have questions about what might lie beneath the button-up jacket :)

I hope to use this (http://www.magical-mouse.biz/Crafts%20Butterick%204954.jpg) design for my captain's jacket (brown burnout taffeta, lined in dusky blue something). But seeing as most of the conventions I attend are during the summer, I want to be able to take off the jacket (or at least open it up every so often) and have something nifty underneath. Originally, I had the idea of a waist cincher (that dusky blue material, or black pleather) over a cream/off-white period blouse. Would this work? Would a corset be better? I've seen so very many female Steampunk designs that incorporate leather corsets or waist-cinchers, but I'm not quite sure how they work into the period... *hasn't done enough period clothing research yet* Also, are pants acceptable for Steampunk women? I wanted to include a knee-length skirt with maybe bloomers or straight-leg pants for underneath, but the only thing I know I really want right now is the jacket. I was also considering a fishtail-looking skirt, but I'm not entirely sure that would be appropriate or practical for an airship captain, which is what my character is.

More questions about something different :D

My friend wants to do a Steampunk doctor or medic. What might you all suggest to put in his doctor's bag? Regular doctor's tools? Anything in particular that might be Steampunk-specific, like a set of screwdrivers for mechanical parts or oil for hinges? Just trying to brainstorm.

Thanks muchly :heart:

Giedrius
08-05-2009, 03:59 AM
hello everypone
on september i gona go to some small cosplay
and was thinking about making steampunk mad hatter from alice in wonderland
and i have a problem
what accessory i shuld use?
i already have made one liitle thingy out of old clock andit will go on my hat http://giedriusonline.deviantart.com/art/Little-Steampunk-accessory-132190762

Kelley
08-05-2009, 04:52 AM
@shinjuchan, Trying my best not to offend anyone, but I think the "corset as outerwear", especially in Steampunk is a really overdone cliché.

I know 100% historical accuracy is not the point of Steampunk - though a corset over a shirt would NEVER be done (in any period I can think of outside modern "costuming" - though I admit I don't know a great deal about traditional Asian costume, speaking of which, a semi-authentic obi-belt might be kind of awesome - and, if you're going Victorian influence - the Victorians did love Japan - and there are examples of Japanese influence in Victorian women's dresses), unless you were a mentally ill prostitute or something (that's not meant as insulting - that's just... pretty much who I can think of that would have done that, maybe a really sloshed housewife, I dunno) - but it's still really over-done.

I urge the thinking of practicality when it comes to designing a costume for a self-created character. What would your character wear ? If a fishtail skirt is not practical for fighting or whatever you do on an airship, don't wear one. If it's a fancy-dress on-world attire, make the whole outfit like that.

Women throughout history have cross-dressed for practical reasons. Sometimes not fully - for instance, wearing a skirt over pants was certainly done.



As for the doctor - I would urge the person to think about their character, and what their character would need or use - not just what's neat-o and gimicky. Look into actual period instruments, go from there - some are certainly weird and cool-looking all on their own.

paper cosplay
08-05-2009, 08:47 AM
personally I prefer going more weird west with my steam punk, more cowboy then Victorian.

with the doctors bag. colored glass bottles for medichine. bone saw. ear trumpet for listening to the hart

I did a search for 19th century medical tools this is one of the sites I found
http://collectibles.about.com/od/medicalandsurgicalantiqu/ss/LSmedical_3.htm

lilibat
08-08-2009, 12:25 AM
I have been doing the Steamgoth thing for quite a while now, so I have a it of experience here. ;)

Start with Victorian or Edwardian clothing and build on that.

Don't be afraid of colour, unless it's flourscent which tends to not work.

Spend lots of time looking at pictures. brassgoggles (http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php) , steamfashion LJ (http://community.livejournal.com/steamfashion/) and good old google (http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=steampunk&sourceid=navclient-ff&rlz=1B3GGGL_enUS336US336&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi) should help.

Check out my deviant art link in my sig., I have been making Steampunk objects and accessories for some time now. No, not trying to sell anything I no longer do that as I don't have time.

Lots of women doing the adventurer type thing go with pants. Jodhpurs with tall boots or spats work well. You can go with a blouse and waist cincher or a corset. Both work.

You can get antique and reproduction antique medical devices on ebay, there is a lot of interesting stuff here (http://www.arcsandsparks.com/).

Here are a couple of pictures of me in different steampunkish outfits. 1 (http://pics.livejournal.com/lilibat/pic/000axy0y/) - 2 (http://pics.livejournal.com/lilibat/pic/000aqgtp) - 3 (http://pics.livejournal.com/lilibat/pic/000apxad)

RogueMimzy
08-08-2009, 09:52 AM
Thank you so much everyone ^^ You've given me a lot to think about.

Nachoman
08-09-2009, 12:39 PM
Shinjuchan:
If you go for pants, remember to get a male pattern. Female-patterned slacks didn't get designed till after the Great War (WWI).

Kelley
08-17-2009, 01:13 PM
Actually, it depends on the "pants".

There were women's "pants" before WWI, and not just the bulky "bloomers".


See here : http://www.costumes.org/HISTORY/victorian/CPG/3/gallery/pages/03_043.htm The Equestrienne Trousers (with the demonstrated lady riding side-saddle too, of all things) - which were enough in fashion and accepted enough to make it into a tailoring guide (I have not seen the "bloomers" in any of these).


Also, pre-1900 men's pants were cut noticeably different from post-1900 (well, it was a few years after 1900, but whatever) dress pants. Men's "dress slacks" of today do not have the same shape as they once did.

Victorian (an early Victorian example, but the shape remains throughout) : http://img128.imageshack.us/img128/1210/giornaledeisartiaug1853cw9.jpg
Modern : http://www.boscovs.com/wcsstore/boscovs/images/store/product/images/063654567404858423.jpg

rawien8706
08-18-2009, 07:53 PM
This thread has given me good ideas since I'm looking into doing at least a little steampunk cosplaying myself.

Also, for steampunk costumes I've found it's better to have an idea of what kind of character you want before you put something together because sometimes things don't work for certain characters and having too much can end up looking miss-mashy. Ex: goggles work more for the mechanics/airship captains/etc because they'd be a necessy and functional piece whereas they'd just look random on a more upperclass/aristocrat character. (unless you were some upperclass airship captain or something.)

Glad you mentioned about characters. Though I know you're probably talking about mechanics and the alike, even knowing an anime/video game character helps too...

I'm thinking steampunk!axel or steampunk!riku from kh2. Comments? Suggestions?

WilwarinAndamar
09-08-2009, 08:39 PM
I'm fairly new to steampunk and attempting my first original costume at NebrasKon this year. I'm starting small, making a reticule embroidered with cogs on one side and my name in Victorian-style script on the other.

This costume will also be a significant challenge for me; my goal is to create a quality costume without spending any money on it. All materials used will be what I have hoarded over the years as a cosplayer. ^_^

I have a shirt that I'm going to mod using the Threadbanger's tutorial on Youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbxRdDjp67g). I also have patterns for the skirt and corset and (hopefully) enough fabric for both.

ShikaChu
09-27-2009, 12:05 AM
Old post, but threadbanger.com has a whole week dedicated to Steampunk. :) I love her outfit and I can make it all.

I'm planning on doing steampunk for my friends Sweet 16. It's a masquerade and I wasn't sure what to do as a mask. Not goggles. I'm doing aristocrat. Though I'm not sure what to do with my hair (I was thinking faux-hawk) or if I should do a masque that's period appropriate or if I should make the mask steampunk and not masquerade-esque.

Gaku_X
09-28-2009, 09:17 AM
[QUOTE=questionablekri;2595374]A good place for ideas for steampunk help/ideas/etc would be this forum: http://www.brassgoggles.co.uk/bg-forum/index.php (specifically the tactile and anatomical boards.)
QUOTE]

BG.Go there,read things.Yes.
Even if this is a semi-necro-bump,this is something I feel the need to ramble on about.
Don't think you HAVE TO go for gears all over,goggle wearing sky-pirate/mad scientist/inventor-engineer look.
If you give BG a good prodding,you'll unearth steampulp,absinthepunk,gypsysteam,steamorient,weir dwest-Loads of offshoot styles have sprouted out of the main hub of steampunk.
One can go in many directions from the main ideas,and I suggest developing a persona before putting together outfits.
I just urge anyone wanting to jump into the whole steam realm to really give it a look first,and come up with something all your own.I love seeing people change,and influence the community with new ideas and styles.
Aspiring to the look of others is alright,but as has been said in many topics like this-steampunk is not just gears and goggles.

Alegrah
03-26-2010, 10:07 AM
My advice would be don't get too wrapped up in "Is it Steampunk or not?" Define it too rigidly and you loose your artistic license. Not every idea has to be some adventuring Victorian Brit. There's the "Weird" West (i.e cowboys). There's Chinese/Eastern influences you can bring in. Brown and brass are good colors, but there's other palletes and shades that can be made to work.

Think anchronistic technology - modern concepts with past technology. Functionality, every bit and do-dad should look like it has a reason for being there (whether it actually works doesn't matter).

I totally agree! Also, some things that you can put in, are almost "lolita effects" A costume that I've designed and would be happy to show has the large skirt and a military jacket, but lots of brass buttons and a brass "crinoline". Also, I like keeping a bit of femininity in my costumes. Also, if you're just starting out, I think it's best to take some simple items from second hand stores and alter them, and make on small piece to start out. Or make accessories from scratch.

blackwindow12
04-15-2010, 10:39 PM
Anyone know any places in/around brisbane where I can find steampunk clothing and/or Gear pieces and things to use EG pressure gauges piping.. ETC
thankyou!!!

Braithcakes
07-12-2010, 10:21 PM
defining steampunk= impossible.

and to ask cosplayers to give the do's and don'ts, while there are some really AMAZING answers here, probably isn't the best thing to do.

I'd go to brassgoggles.co.uk and looka round their forum, or maybe ask around the forum, you may see some things that surprise you ^^

anyways, here's my opinions

Do's: Try to make it period accurate if you can.
Don'ts: overdo it on the machinary/goggles/brass part, subtlety is good too.
also don't: find some way to upset the real steampunks at conventions 0_0 they will laser you.

Roozu
07-17-2010, 03:26 AM
I'm not completely sure if this is the right thread to post this in, but it seems like it would fit.

As with others, I am new to the entire "steampunk" community. A friend asked if I would like to join a group her and a few friends were planning and I accepted because, hell, seemed pretty fun. It's the type of group where we are all making alternate personas and I have just came up with the jist of my alter ego, but even though I'm new, I'd like to make this as accurate and "working" as I can.

But because I'm dumb and whatnot, I really would rather not choose a "cliche" profession or make a "typical" steampunk persona. (And I hope I don't sound like a snob or anything. It's just..I don't want to be "oh just another airship captain" even though there is nothing wrong with airship captains).

So could those who know more about this community share some light on the "overused" and "underused" occupations or duties surrounding this genre.

I'd appreciate it a lot. Thanks. C:

Mangochutney
07-17-2010, 10:56 AM
It's not the job, it's the quality. Worry more about whether you look great than whether too many people have used the same profession for inspiration that you did.

Roozu
07-17-2010, 11:23 AM
^Yeah, you're right.

Maybe I was just being paranoid and whatnot since I'm new to this, but thinking about it. . .you're right.

Thanks for that small tidbit. . .I'm so going to remember that.

Kaoshima
07-19-2010, 11:10 PM
There are plenty of other "classes" to think about though if you wish to bend the mold a little. You could be the Genius Mechanic/Tinkerer, the Hired Gun/Muscle, the "Roustabout" (cabin boy/street urchin basically, sometimes assistant to the Tinkerer) the Good Doktor, (and yes, I mean the meniacal, german accent, bringing things to life kind), the Soldier/Ex-Soldier (may overlap a bit with Hired Gun), the Flying Ace, etc... the sky's the limit.

DevTehFiend
07-28-2010, 02:25 PM
Hey, I'm a little new to the steampunk thing, just learned about it actually at the convention I was just at last weekend (they had, like, five booths that sold Steampunk gear and I got to talking with some of the dealers about it.)

I want to design a kind of old west based steampunk out fit based on a picture my friend took ( http://i951.photobucket.com/albums/ad358/FiendishlyDev/steampunkinspiration.jpg ) and was wondering if a vest like this would be accurate: http://www.theoldwestgallery.com/servlet/the-293/BUTTERCUP-LADIES-VEST/Detail I just kind of googled old west patterns (not wanting to fall into the typical corset trap) and found this, and since the internet is always right (sarcasm) I was hoping to get some insight. Don't know when I'll have time to make the outfit, but I'd sort of like to get used to designing.

If anyone has any ideas they'd like to share based on the picture I'd love to hear (or read.) Like I said, I'm completely new and would like to know what some of you experts think and what you get from that picture.