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FyreGothChylde
12-09-2008, 02:33 PM
I was looking around on the board and I don't believe I saw this..but yeah does anyone know anyone online tutorials on how to use a pattern?
I really want to get out of just modifying stuff..I'm starting to think it'll be easier just to make everything on my own XD.
Also can anyone recommend any patterns that would be easy to start with so I can get some practice?

Thanks! I would appeciate any advice for this..^.^.

han-pan
12-09-2008, 02:46 PM
There are no...tutorials...on using patterns to my knowledge, and to me it's because patterns themselves ARE tutorials in a way :) There are directions and labels and such on any pattern you would use, and every produced pattern is different--so how could we really write a tutorial on how to read? ^^; if you couldn't read, you'd have trouble understanding the tutorial :P It really is just...cut, read, sew. ^^

The commonly recommended companies for new sewers include Simplicity, Kwik-Sew and McCalls. I've heard Vogue and Burda are sometimes difficult to understand. Some patterns will have ratings on them as well, as to whether they're for beginners, intermediates, etc. http://www.patternreview.com is a really good site for reading reviews on patterns if you find one you'd like :)

The Hag
12-09-2008, 03:08 PM
I don't know of any off-hand, but googling "How to read a sewing pattern" turns up a number of likely candidates.

For a first project, look for something that is not very fitted (capes, tunics, drawstring or elastic waist pants) and something with only a few pieces (4 or even 2!) If the pieces aren't shown on the back of the pattern envelope or in the catalog, you can open the envelope and look at the instructions inside. Simplicity, McCall's and Butterick are the most straight forward pattern brands. Burda and Vogue can be trickier. The catalogs often identify certain patterns as "Easy" or "1-hour project". Those are good bets.

Good luck!

FyreGothChylde
12-09-2008, 05:39 PM
Ah okay, I appeciate the advice! Maybe a cape would be a good thing to start off with..^.^ Oh no I can read but I had just heard that most patterns were nearly impossible to read because of the small print or something to that sort so thanks for clearing that up for me as well XD.

Bahzi
12-09-2008, 05:40 PM
I don't know of any off-hand, but googling "How to read a sewing pattern" turns up a number of likely candidates.

For a first project, look for something that is not very fitted (capes, tunics, drawstring or elastic waist pants) and something with only a few pieces (4 or even 2!) If the pieces aren't shown on the back of the pattern envelope or in the catalog, you can open the envelope and look at the instructions inside. Simplicity, McCall's and Butterick are the most straight forward pattern brands. Burda and Vogue can be trickier. The catalogs often identify certain patterns as "Easy" or "1-hour project". Those are good bets.

Good luck!

What she said, and also, many sewing books have whole chapters on how to read and use a sewing pattern. A good sewing book is something every new costume maker should get.

I noticed the Simplicity 'Simply the Best' sewing book Joann has right now (has spiral binding and is on several displays in their stores currently), has a good section on patterns, and if you used a 40% off coupon from their mailers, it'd be less than $10. It's just something that's good to have, and the spiral binding is useful, the book stays on the page you turn it to when you set it down. XD

Kazephyr
12-09-2008, 05:43 PM
I don't really think there are tutorials on pattern reading, but you could always look up sewing terminology. ^^ The confusing part of pattern-reading, for newcomers to sewing, are usually the "insider" terms the instructions use. I've seen a ton of websites with "sewing dictionaries" that explain what basting, slip-stitching, etc. mean. ^^

Example: http://www.sewingweb.com/dictionary/

Try googling it. ^^

AngieRikku
12-09-2008, 07:10 PM
If you can't read a pattern (like me T-T) you could buy a dress form (Or make a duct tape one!) and drape the fabric over it in order to cut the shapes you want while seeing how it looks on the body. Draping is a common method fashion designers use and I'm pretty fond of it myself. =3 Otherwise, you could use some clothing items you already have and trace the patterns from them If they are similar to what you are making.

Shadowoffire123
12-09-2008, 08:54 PM
I noticed the Simplicity 'Simply the Best' sewing book Joann has right now (has spiral binding and is on several displays in their stores currently), has a good section on patterns, and if you used a 40% off coupon from their mailers, it'd be less than $10. It's just something that's good to have, and the spiral binding is useful, the book stays on the page you turn it to when you set it down. XD

I got an older copy of this book at a garage sale. It really does have a great section on patterns and an index for looking up any terms you're unfamiliar with. Very, very useful book.