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EgnirysFaye
09-27-2009, 02:00 PM
Meaning cosplays based on historical people (Or Periods/Events in general too) which can range from anything...Greco-Roman, Medieval, Feudal, Rennaissance, Victorian, Edwardian, 1920's...and anywhere from around the world of course.

Shows like "The Tudors" can apply as well, along with any sort of book or movies with similar genre.

I want to do two cosplays that are as such, Marie Antoinette and/or Elizabeth I. Elizabeth is pretty much my hero XD whereas Marie was also part of something significant in history - and I do like the 18th century Georgian dress.

Madame de Pompadour, the intellectual mistress of King Louis, was also an idea.

I'm mainly talking about real life, but fictional is deffinatly welcome. So yesh, was wondering if there are any other folks out there! I know there have been a couple so far.

mike03
09-27-2009, 04:55 PM
I cosplayed as Hitler. Fortunately, I got home safe, sound and breathing lol :)

http://i33.tinypic.com/2dj12e1.jpg
Click on here to watch our X-Men group's skit on YT (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCpMNmmYi2I) | Multiply (http://mikefrias.multiply.com) | Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/migueljosefrias)

mike03
09-27-2009, 05:01 PM
I cosplayed as Adolf Hitler a month ago. Fortunately, I got home safe, sound and breathing lol xD

Kelley
09-27-2009, 09:13 PM
Oscar Wilde, May 1st.

MAYBE Dionysus for Halloween, but I'm starting to think no.


That's about it, though.

I might do an 1890s tailcoat, but it would be for "real life", not cosplay.

MistakenTrekkie
09-27-2009, 10:26 PM
I very much want to cosplay Cleopatra. Not like the chinsy Party City costumes, but using historical reference and research on how one constructs such costumes. Also, Anastasia Romanov, I really want to cosplay.

ShinobiXikyu
09-27-2009, 10:54 PM
Making my boyfriend a Cavalier vampire costume for Halloween, and we both plan on medieval (and LotR costumes eventually if it counts as mildly historic). And of course, historical Japanese costume is a huge love of mine. I definitely love medieval costuming. There's just no freakin' medieval fairs that are less than 300 kilometres from here, so the last time I got to wear the stuff was my semi-formal three years ago:P (And lol, I definitely turned heads X3)

Sarcasm-hime
09-27-2009, 11:04 PM
I cosplayed Mata Hari (http://www.cosplay.com/gallery/110913/) last year. I also want to cosplay Borte from the movie Mongol (so, historical Mongolian) and have several historical-dress costumes I want to make (not of specific people) like a cotehardie, Tudor, robe a la francaise (i.e. Marie Antoinette style), 1870s bustle gown.

If you're really into historical costuming you should check out Costume College and Costume-Con; Costume College is chock full of historical costumers and Costume-Con always gets a good number as well as cosplayers, sci-fi/fantasy and original design costumes.

EgnirysFaye
09-28-2009, 12:22 AM
mike03: Holy.Crap. I am seriously suprised that you are still alive XD;

OrLadyC: Ah Oscar Wilde, that is pretty darn awesome.

MistakenTrekkie: Those are two very lovely ideas - Especially in regards to Anastasia Romanov.

SoundsShinobiYuki: I know the feeling, a fair like that is also far for me - pain in the butt lol especially since I always wanted to be part of one. I worked as a interpretor one summer for a 19th century fort and wore 1840's clothing every day, but a Medieval Fest would be such a cherry on the cream lmao and Japanese and Medieval costuming? deffinetly impressive!

Sarcasm-hime: Stunning job! And thanks for the info about the two events, it is useful to know they are out there.


This is why I had to make a post about this sort of topic, I highly enjoy the creative and unique ideas (At the risk of sounding cheesy) since the variety is pretty broad.

mike03
09-28-2009, 01:31 PM
mike03: Holy.Crap. I am seriously suprised that you are still alive XD

Lol xD Well I'm in the Philippines so it's not as big a deal here as it is in Europe or the US :) Too bad it's just been deleted by cosplay.com's admin, I've been wondering like I don't know why they did that lol

Mangochutney
09-28-2009, 03:22 PM
I, er, hi. :D I am currently locked in a land war with Queen Elizabeth. She would like to have my apartment to keep her dress in, and I tell her noooo I must live here also but she does not listen.

I LOVE historical costuming, it's so ornate and awe-inspiring for all the labor involved in its construction and unlike costumes from an illustrated source, it OBEYS PHYSICS. Holy crap.

I've done mostly European stuff so far but I'm absolutely in love with eighteenth-century Korean dress (braided wigs the size of cake platters, woo hoo) and traditional Mongolian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mongols_clothes_man_and_woman.jpg). Look at that headpiece. Those BEADS. The EMBROIDERY. nnnngh.

EgnirysFaye, you have got to let me know what you're planning for Good Queen Bess. I know it will be superb and I crave details.

alpha_helix
09-28-2009, 03:38 PM
My name is Alpha, and I am a historical costuming addict. Nearly all of my costumes have been at least somewhat historically inclined, and I'd dress like it was 1889 every day if it was a little more practical. I'm not a fan of modern clothing, certainly not a fan of making it, and as such, the costumes that I feel like making are either historical or way out there fantasy/sci-fi.

I'm mostly into late Victorian, especially the 1880s, but I'm starting to branch out. Aaaand, my list for historical or historically inclined costumes to happen in the near future are as follows:

-Regency vampire bite victim for Halloween (and most likely to come back out for cons!)
-Mrs. Lovett, for a friend of mine. Even though the screen costume was highly stylized, we decided to make a few changes to bring it closer to reality. Still keeping th corset on the outside look, but that's pretty much the only thing that glaringly incorrect for our version
-18th century vampire. Yessss.
Steampunk Vulcan. I start my steampunk with proper Victorian undergarments and construction, so it kind of fits in here.
-Edwardian evening gown. I have no idea when I will have time for this, but dammit I want one!

MistakenTrekkie
09-28-2009, 06:55 PM
My name is Alpha, and I am a historical costuming addict. Nearly all of my costumes have been at least somewhat historically inclined, and I'd dress like it was 1889 every day if it was a little more practical. I'm not a fan of modern clothing, certainly not a fan of making it, and as such, the costumes that I feel like making are either historical or way out there fantasy/sci-fi.

I'm mostly into late Victorian, especially the 1880s, but I'm starting to branch out. Aaaand, my list for historical or historically inclined costumes to happen in the near future are as follows:

-Regency vampire bite victim for Halloween (and most likely to come back out for cons!)
-Mrs. Lovett, for a friend of mine. Even though the screen costume was highly stylized, we decided to make a few changes to bring it closer to reality. Still keeping th corset on the outside look, but that's pretty much the only thing that glaringly incorrect for our version
-18th century vampire. Yessss.
Steampunk Vulcan. I start my steampunk with proper Victorian undergarments and construction, so it kind of fits in here.
-Edwardian evening gown. I have no idea when I will have time for this, but dammit I want one!
Steampunk Vulcan?????? Like Spock?

alpha_helix
09-28-2009, 10:31 PM
Yes, like Spock. But 19th century.

EgnirysFaye
09-28-2009, 11:57 PM
Mangochutney: Good old Queenie XD and I am absolutely delighted that you posted! I have seen your sig from before, totally wicked. I have three desires so far in regards to Liz: Her cream/white dress with the white plume on her head, her blue dress with the gold lining and see-through sleeves (both from the movie of course) and one of the dresses based on a real original portrait of her. And what can one see from the extreme detail on that last option, it would be cosplay suicide, thus there is a very high likely that one of the first two dresses will be done. (But if I do attempt a portrait one, because I am sooo smart, just want to say that it was nice knowing you...)

And yes! you are definatly right about the delight and appreciation a person gets from the rawness of it all, especially when you pay close attention to the impressive detail.

alpha_helix: Very nice! The Victorian era was no doubt a very unique and creative time, from fashion to litterature. This might be a shot in the dark, but have you ever seen Murdoch Mysteries?

Mangochutney
09-29-2009, 12:08 AM
Oh god. You're going to do the Ditchley portrait gown, aren't you? O_O

alpha_helix
09-29-2009, 12:33 AM
alpha_helix: Very nice! The Victorian era was no doubt a very unique and creative time, from fashion to litterature. This might be a shot in the dark, but have you ever seen Murdoch Mysteries?

Haven't seen it, but I just looked it up, and it sounds like something I would be interested in.

And I forgot my biggest, most important item on the old to-do list. THIS (http://www.abcgallery.com/T/tissot/tissot17.html)! It's my dream dress, and I could only wear that much pink for Tissot. No one else could make me wear that much damn pink.

I must sound insane.

Mangochutney
09-29-2009, 12:52 AM
It's my dream dress, and I could only wear that much pink for Tissot. No one else could make me wear that much damn pink.

I must sound insane.

In the best possible way. What a #$%#$ fabulous garment that is. It's like a whole hedge of tea roses made violent love to a tailor.

Satine
09-29-2009, 04:21 AM
http://costumes.glittersweet.com

Note the number of historical categories vs recreation ;) Mostly Victorian and Renaissance.

EgnirysFaye
09-30-2009, 11:58 PM
Oh god. You're going to do the Ditchley portrait gown, aren't you? O_O

At least it would be better than the Armada Portrait! 8D but in all seriousness it would be this http://3.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_kp92p6f3cH1qa1tufo1_r1_500.jpg (As a young princess) or the portrait from 1575, which is also ridiculously detailed. But that one would probably be the unlikely one to do..

So yeah...white dress, blue dress, or reddish portrait dress. Decision will be made sometime in October.




Haven't seen it, but I just looked it up, and it sounds like something I would be interested in.

And I forgot my biggest, most important item on the old to-do list. THIS (http://www.abcgallery.com/T/tissot/tissot17.html)! It's my dream dress, and I could only wear that much pink for Tissot. No one else could make me wear that much damn pink.



Mmhm, it's a great show. And I agree about that dress, looks like it would be fun to make too - a challenge, but fun!

EgnirysFaye
10-01-2009, 12:01 AM
http://costumes.glittersweet.com

Note the number of historical categories vs recreation ;) Mostly Victorian and Renaissance.

Thanks for the link! :)

iycis
10-01-2009, 11:31 AM
At least it would be better than the Armada Portrait! 8D but in all seriousness it would be this http://3.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_kp92p6f3cH1qa1tufo1_r1_500.jpg (As a young princess) or the portrait from 1575, which is also ridiculously detailed. But that one would probably be the unlikely one to do..

So yeah...white dress, blue dress, or reddish portrait dress. Decision will be made sometime in October.






Mmhm, it's a great show. And I agree about that dress, looks like it would be fun to make too - a challenge, but fun!

If you're feeling intimidated by that portrait pic, buy the book The Tudor Tailor. It has patterns, history, and tips for doing accurate Tudor clothing.

Kelley
10-01-2009, 11:43 AM
Speaking of Elizabethan, I was committed to embroider about 35 yards of 2-3" detail on a gown.

However, I then decided that although the dress itself was amazing, I would rather not wear it myself (the same being said of most women's clothing, costume or not - characters like Frank-N-Furter being exceptions because they're so ridiculous).

I might be making a Victorian ball-gown or at least a Regency dress for a friend - the former being worn with a corset, though since she won't be around for fittings, I'm going to have to make an invisible lacing panel for best fit if we go that route.

And that would include corset, bustle, petticoat, gown, gloves and headwear (and likely wig), at least (she should be able to fit a pair of shoes I already own).




ALSO ! If you do the Elizabethan, make sure you have a full petticoat, having the hoops show through to the outer dress in "ribs" happens all too often. And definitely look into drafting your own patterns (and the right underwear). Also, although it doesn't really matter when no one can see it, thinnish reed looks prettier in a corset than cable ties or steel boning (the thin lines it makes). I guess it also technically "breathes" better since it is a natural fibre and not plastic or steel.



I forgot, I also have the fabric for a Beau Brummell-esque costume, but I'm not sure how likely it is that that will ever get made. This might sound blasphemous, but I'm trying to cut back on the costumes in an effort to produce great "everyday life" clothing.

Mangochutney
10-01-2009, 12:11 PM
I'm trying to cut back on the costumes in an effort to produce great "everyday life" clothing.

I'm doing something similar. I don't have to worry about a dress code at work, though, so "everyday life clothing" is going to include the most awesome Mongolian coat and pants and a very modest bustle skirt once I can pick up the fabric for them.

alpha_helix
10-01-2009, 02:09 PM
I've been thinking of doing that too, but I can't bring myself to tone down the costumes! Though, I do have a Regency dress that I wear on a semi-regular basis, a few calf-length bustle skirts, and I'd like to make some Edwardian inspired things too.

EgnirysFaye
10-01-2009, 04:51 PM
If you're feeling intimidated by that portrait pic, buy the book The Tudor Tailor. It has patterns, history, and tips for doing accurate Tudor clothing.

It's not so much being intimidated by the prospect of creating the attire itself, but moreso at the cost of making it. Being a university student (History Major and Art History Minor, surprise surprise. Working on graduate studies in Battlefield Archaeology/Conservation of Historical Artifacts soon, hopefully in the UK.) I just like to be very savvy and careful with money, and creative with materials.

That being said, that book sounds very useful, thank you very much! I'd love to go and find it. Can't beat the importance of authenticity, since I'm very fussy when it comes to something raw.



----


Anyone else heart vintage stores?

dagmarus
10-01-2009, 10:59 PM
I put together a 101st Airborne Paratrooper.

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2287580/

Satine
10-02-2009, 01:10 AM
Also, although it doesn't really matter when no one can see it, thinnish reed looks prettier in a corset than cable ties or steel boning (the thin lines it makes). I guess it also technically "breathes" better since it is a natural fibre and not plastic or steel.

It does indeed breathe better but is only really good for non integrated tabbed corsets- unless you soak the corset and wear it until it dries which could work well. Hmmm experiment coming up..... I have had a lot of feedback about how it is prone to snapping at the waist from women using them to bone stays that have incorporated tabs. Fantastic for Dorothea style stays where the boning isn't forced into the curves at the side waist :)

Cable ties are great for this period when you use them exactly as the original corsets used boning. Basically no single bone has much stress when you have 100 bones all the way around the body ;) Weight for weight and flex for flex cable ties are much like horn actually. I've handled antique horn and baleen and the horn survived far better than the baleen. Baleen dries over the years and becomes brittle and snaps. Horn stays really plastic and gets very warm and incidentally can be wrapped around the finger easily ;)
Used sparingly they will need to be replaced fairly often (as baleen was) as they will eventually not just conform to your shape (which is good) but warp into an exagerrated form (not so good).


TT is useful for a good look fast but is not quite as accurate as it was intended. For "accuracy" you can't go past the actual patterns used by tailors and the extant garments. You do need to then be able to scale up as they are not patterns as we are familiar with them :) And then eventually hunting down tailors ordinances and inventaries and... ehm. I am currently forcing my way through about 2,000 printed pages of text from a man's journal (1560ish to 1590ish) and it is doing my head in but it's been great for finding how items were bought together and which were bought regularly and for colours and fabrics.

Anyway for patterning if cost is an issue go here:
http://www.renaissancetailor.com/demos_patterndraft.htm
Nice simple how to start to drafting a bodice pattern.
And:
http://www.renaissancetailor.com/research_b181.htm
High necked, trained gown of flannel for a woman
http://www.renaissancetailor.com/research_b161.htm
A French gown of damask
http://www.renaissancetailor.com/research_axunknown.htm
Spanish gown with hanging sleeves
http://www.elizabethancostume.net/Tailors/womens.html
A few stylised diagrams for skirts and sleeves.

I have a super easy method for scaling the skirts up but a handy start is my page dealing with half circle skirts that sort of shows the difference between the two skirt styles in Alcega and those other Spanish manuscripts.
http://articles.glittersweet.com/howto/skirttutorial.htm
I do intend to do a "how to make the Algega skirts work" page but it may need to wait until I get my new Effigy stays finished and my Francaise done :)

Hmm Actually if I get to work now I can get it uploaded tonight. Yeah.... I keep telling poeole how great these pattern diagrams are and I keep getting looked at strangely because they are quite different to modern patterns and require puzzle solving as well as maths ;)

EgnirysFaye
10-03-2009, 04:22 PM
I suddenly feel a little bit underestimated, or feel as if I was suppose to be ignorant about the subject :crylaugh: even if alot of the info was really great and I respect everyone's knowledge. (My apologies for assuming if it was far from the case)

And those links are superb Satine ^_^ thanks for all your information and the time to put everything together, it's all really useful.

At least it has been decided - would like to do the portrait version. I just adore the dress, and it is still based on someone I admire, even if a little more obscure and the chances of being confused with someone else are high.

I was a volunteer at a Shakespeare festival in making gowns - not 100% like the times, and not ridiculously elaborate, but basic knowledge at least. I suppose I'll just continue using my own old books and blend it with modern patterns for certain parts when necessary. And use the Art History background.

kelldar
10-04-2009, 06:35 PM
I made an Anne Boleyn dress for Dragoncon this year, loosely based on one from The Other Boleyn GIrl. I'm pretty pleased with it, I'm itching to make another historical costume now!

iycis
10-04-2009, 09:59 PM
TT is useful for a good look fast but is not quite as accurate as it was intended. For "accuracy" you can't go past the actual patterns used by tailors and the extant garments. You do need to then be able to scale up as they are not patterns as we are familiar with them :) And then eventually hunting down tailors ordinances and inventaries and... ehm. I am currently forcing my way through about 2,000 printed pages of text from a man's journal (1560ish to 1590ish) and it is doing my head in but it's been great for finding how items were bought together and which were bought regularly and for colours and fabrics.



Useful for a good look fast?!?! I just visited Hampton Court Palace two weeks ago and the actors working there wear costumes made from patterns created by and researched by the ladies who wrote that book. I assure you, they're very accurate. I've used patterns out of the book myself and its not some walk in the park like using a terribly inaccurate commericial pattern.

alpha_helix
10-05-2009, 01:55 PM
I think what Satine is getting at is the difference between primary and secondary resources. When you're looking at someone else's research, you're looking through the filter of the person who did the research, and you have to trust that the claims they make are justified and that they're not stretching the evidence too far. It's a whole other thing to go straight to the evidence and see it for yourself without someone else's filter in the way. I'm not saying that secondary resources are bad at all, and I don't think Satine was trying to imply that either, but it's not the evidence itself, it's a presentation of the evidence.

Benihime78
10-05-2009, 10:27 PM
I actually have two "historical" cosplays in the works right now. One is an Old West saloon girl, which if it turns out good enough, I might wear it out for fun sometimes and the other is a gypsy outfit that I want to wear to a Renaissance faire sometime.

Kelley
10-11-2009, 05:01 PM
Don't take offence by people trying to help ! :)

I've been researching (admittedly, not with the greatest of effort) for years, and I still don't know as much as Satine ! The more you know, the better the finished product will be. :)

Even if the knowledge is something you can't practically apply, just knowing it helps.


I don't think you're dumb or anything - but I just got the impression that this was your first costume of the type since you said, "I want to do two cosplays that are as such" - sounding like you hadn't done one before !



Even if you were only making an "impression" costume (which I would guess is what most theatres do - since there isn't a great need to make a full-scale reproduction, nor the budget unless they're a really large and profitable company), I think it's helpful to know what is "ideal". :D

alterationsbyem
10-11-2009, 05:34 PM
Hey everyone!

I am making a historical cosplay this week, I got a job as a ghost tour guide at Gettysburg and require a mourning outfit. I have been cleared for broadcloth and this pattern http://www.mccallpattern.com/item/M5132.htm?tab=out_of_print/costumes&page=2 I will be doing a ten o'clock ghost tour in seminary ridge fridays and saturdays. I hope to get some pics up this week.

First tour is Friday!

Dany
10-11-2009, 06:40 PM
While I only have a few specifically historical outfits (not listed in the site well..just because they weren't specific characters), I do have historically influenced costumes. Mina Harker and Alucard (Castlevania) are two I know of for sure, and I might have one or two others that may apply, whether in concept, or even construction. Redd, for example, was built almost exclusively on historical patterns...two different eras, in fact (it was a joy to fit together a Renaissance bodice with an early Victorian bustle dress, lemme tell you!).

I sometimes wonder if I will ever be able to do something completely modern...but my luck to make it work I'll need serious historical underpinnings to hold everything up XD

angola
10-13-2009, 02:21 AM
when you list the periods,I flash one word suddenly:vampire
as long as the history last

Le Communard
10-17-2009, 01:42 AM
Heh, my dream has always been to do a Roman group gig: one is Caesar Agustus, flanked by two Fasces-bearing bodyservents along with a personal slave who would scream orders at people in Latin to show proper respect for the Emperor of the Romans (you could also have a Titus Pullo and Lucis Vourenus if you wanted to take that angle). I mean, if you want spectacle, why not go with the guys who invented it? The one problem is that I've never been able to shanghai anyone else into the scheme. =[

The other one I considered like that was Ottoman sultan and entourage (harem girls, barbary pirates, eunuchs, greek viziers, Janissaries, the works), but you'd really have to turn that one up to 11 or it would just fall flat.

gardenofatlas
10-17-2009, 02:17 AM
Historical costuming is my favorite type of costuming, hands down. I'm an history buff so that may have something to do with it. I've done a number of historical-based cosplay... Jane from Tarzan (Victorian), Clockwork Droid from Doctor Who (Rococo), and Mercy Hartigan from Doctor Who (1850's-60's) being my favorites.

I also attend a number of renaissance faires where I play Elizabethan nobility and I'm the founder of the Georgia Regency Society (http://www.garegency.org), the south east's only Regency (early 19th century) reenactment group.

I don't really have a favorite era, I love them all... but I have severe CADD* and ADOS** so depending on what kind of mood I'm in, I may be more into hoop skirts or panniers. You never know.

*Costume ADD
**Attention Deficit -- Oh! Shiny!

Satine
10-20-2009, 02:53 AM
Thanks Alpha :) The book is for a different audience than those who do the historical displays that the authors work for. There is a lot of overlap and a lot of the information (and the reference section! Woot!) is extremely useful even for those who do not need the hand up.

Even if the knowledge is something you can't practically apply, just knowing it helps.

Very well said :) I can't apply a lot of hand finishing techniques because I literally have lost a fingerwidth of bone from both my wrists which makes a lot of sewing rather difficult. But knowing how linings were put in by hand helps me understand how to put in my linings and to support my hems etc :)

ShinobiXikyu
10-28-2009, 12:34 AM
A tad necroed, but now my boyfriend and I have confirmed our costumes already for next Halloween- both of us as a 16th century vampire couple. X3. He's already being a version of such for this year (only had time for the shirt, cape and a collar/tie), but not me, and I've lately been dying to put on massive dresses. So next year we'll hopefully be sauntering around the neo-European downtown of the city and making everyone else dressed in vampire garb vomit with envy. Lol.

Fainne Roisin
02-22-2010, 11:03 AM
I'm making two historical gowns this con season: one rococo and one renaissance. Just wondering, how much does it usually cost in supplies to make an elaborate gown?

Satine
02-22-2010, 06:31 PM
How long is a piece of string? ;) Seriously I have made my gowns on a variety of budgets and from a variety of fabrics.

Decide how historically accurate you want to go and then choose your materials from there. Cheaper fabrics can be found that are still good quality just look for wholesalers and sales.

Another factor influenced by the historical aspect is with the layers. To do a proper ensemble you really do need to make sure you have the chemise/shift, support layers and a good lining where appropriate for the support and gown. If you want the look but don't care much about the rest you can make the bodice self supporting and omit the chemise (just remember these are big and hot to wear).

So you have a few options and lee way to make this as expensive or not as you like :) Depending on what costumes you have done before it may wind up less expensive or more ;) My Slave Leia costume wound up costing me as much as my average Historical gown due to the cost of the resin and molding compounds. And the fact I tend to buy all my silk and linen and wool when it is on sale!

ItalianPeach
07-12-2010, 02:38 PM
There are 3 historical outfits that are currently on my list. They are all Anne Boleyn. One is from The Tudors, one from The Other Boleyn Girl, and one from an actual painting.

alpha_helix
07-12-2010, 05:40 PM
I've always got something historical on my list :)

Tonight, I might finish the Edwardian Blind Mag dress, then I just need to make the spencer and bonnet for the Bright Star dress and I will be done for D*Con!

As far as future historical plans, I'm probably doing Dorothea Molder from "Victorian Romance Emma" for Anime USA. I was very impressed with how plausible the clothing is in that series after so much Kuroshitsuji and Rose of Versailles! If I have time I miiiiiiiiiiight make a "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" inspired Regency era zombie/monster hunter (which would be inspired by an actual hunting outfit, but with the addition of badass accessories), and of course the Saxon gown for Costume Con

One day I want to make a more correct version of one of the Rose of Versailles gowns, but I keep putting it off. Last summer I made the stays. This summer I made pocket hoops and a petticoat. Maybe a year from now I'll have a dress.

Ironhill
07-12-2010, 11:46 PM
I am so glad I found this thread.

I have been working on historical costumes for a few years now but it wasn't until last years costumecon that I learned what documentation was needed for judging. I have a Henry the VIII /early Tudor court costume completed and I am working on an American Revolution officers uniform for next year.

I'm also working on a Steampunk gentleman's outfit. I'm trying to keep it proper Victorian garb with slight Steam overtures. Got to love the Victorian sence of fashion.

alpha_helix
07-13-2010, 12:39 AM
I <3 early Tudor!

Also, it sounds like we have the same approach to steampunk: start with the proper Victorian clothing, then add the fun weapons or accessories :D

Damn...that reminds me that I also need to make/buy/steal/acquire a lighsaber for dragon con :<

Lycorisa
07-13-2010, 11:31 AM
I love history and anything that's old fashion like xD. I seriously need to start on something historical :).

Ironhill
07-13-2010, 11:25 PM
Recently at a Sci Fi con I heard that the origional lightsaber was the handle for a camera flash. They just added a crystal and some other stuff to it. Maybe you should start looking at flea markets for camera equipment.

Berzerker_prime
07-28-2010, 03:19 AM
I seem to be on an Elizabethan kick right now. I finished a big Venetian Carnivale costume for last Costume Con and that seemed to set me off to the races. I decided just last Friday that the garb in my closet was just plain too old-hat and that I needed new stuff for my renn faire outing this weekend.

I can't believe I decided to do more embroidery...

RaDragon76
07-28-2010, 09:24 PM
Historical costuming interests:

-Eighteenth Century American, French and English
-Ancient Egyptian
-Russian specifically during the reign of the czars
-20th century (1900-1950)
-Native American dress

I seem to be on an eighteenth century kick myself. The Earth Queen costume I did for last costume con was based on eighteenth century Chinese clothing. I have several eighteenth century gowns in various stages of planning as well as several revolutionary war era military uniforms that I've been wanting to make. Not yet sure when any of them will be done but still. I'm also back on an Egyptian kick too. I have an young Egyptian Prince costume in planning stages for next fall. Gah, that means more beading. I swore I'd never do so much beading again.

Kiichigo
08-01-2010, 05:26 PM
Henry VIII from the Tudors = my dreamcosplay.
Probably isn't going to happen, because I'm quite feminine and, well, budget.

But those clothes?

Ffffffff. Do want.

Flora88
08-03-2010, 12:54 AM
I really, really, really want to crash the Roman Bacchanal weekend at the Renaissance Fair with a Boadicea (Boudica) cosplay. She was so badass. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boadicea) I think it would TOTALLY be fun, since all the staff are required to know their history.

But I have no idea what she would have worn. :(

Berzerker_prime
08-03-2010, 05:07 PM
Well, Boadicea was a member of the Iceni royalty from what is today Norfolk in eastern Great Britain. Historians date her to somewhere around mid-first-century AD and there are some contemporary descriptions by some Roman historians you might be able to work from. You might need to find out what the Iceni wore at the time, though.

ShinobiXikyu
08-11-2010, 06:06 PM
Ahhhh. My hands hurt. I'm embroidering 55 of these (So far, I've finished 12)- http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2663255/ onto my circle cloak for this year's Halloween cosplay. My attempt, using a dress I have already that's a weird mishmash of 12th,14th and 15th century styles, at a 14th century costume. I'm still cursing out the lack of faux miniver/time to make it myself. But I'm still having a LOT of fun with my girdle book. I think I've spent about $30 in pens and art supplies just for the pages.

Oh yeah, where the embroidery's concerned, would that count as period-innacurate white-work? I sure hope not. I can't start over now. X_X

Berzerker_prime
08-11-2010, 06:10 PM
What kind of stitch are you using? I can't quite tell from the picture.

ShinobiXikyu
08-11-2010, 06:17 PM
Mostly back-stitch. The cross-ish pieces are in satin stitch. Yeah, it's a crappy photo. White on black sable suede really doesn't photograph well.

costumemercenar
08-12-2010, 12:35 AM
Henry VIII from the Tudors = my dreamcosplay.
Probably isn't going to happen, because I'm quite feminine and, well, budget.

But Tudor male clothing is all about the padding. This is not to say Henry himself was a slight man, but he padded his shoulders, his thighs, his chest... clothing then was bulky and huge.

See for example how utterly wide Eric Bana (http://www.costumersguide.com/boleyn/misc6.jpg) looked in the Other Boleyn Girl. You could totally pull it off.

Well, Boadicea was a member of the Iceni royalty from what is today Norfolk in eastern Great Britain. Historians date her to somewhere around mid-first-century AD and there are some contemporary descriptions by some Roman historians you might be able to work from. You might need to find out what the Iceni wore at the time, though.

Research is really rather patchy for then, but really, if you want to convey the idea of her, surely trying to match what she looks like in the incredibly famous statue (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Boudiccastatue.jpg) is a good idea? She's almost always pictured in pseudo-Roman clothes in Romantic-era paintings.

Though I suppose you might want to go down the historical route.

DeviousDybbuk
10-03-2010, 04:12 PM
Hello everyone, I'm so glad to find a thread about historical costuming~! I'm thinking of making an 18th century style dress, based on the fashion sense of France's Marie Antoinette (I'm doing a manga that takes place during that time, and I thought it would be cool to have a costume to go along with it). I'm a little nervous on where to begin with it, but it's something I'd love to do someday! Does anyone have any advice/experience?

Sarcasm-hime
10-03-2010, 06:39 PM
Hello everyone, I'm so glad to find a thread about historical costuming~! I'm thinking of making an 18th century style dress, based on the fashion sense of France's Marie Antoinette (I'm doing a manga that takes place during that time, and I thought it would be cool to have a costume to go along with it). I'm a little nervous on where to begin with it, but it's something I'd love to do someday! Does anyone have any advice/experience?

I just made an 18th century ballgown (http://www.flickr.com/photos/64298480@N00/4665215768/in/set-72157624192653022/) earlier this year; I did some modifications as it's a fantasy version, but had to do a lot of research nonetheless.

Patterns I recommend:
http://www.jpryan.com/ladiespatterns.html
I made the half-boned stays as I wanted a more fashionable conical rather than tubular shape; I found the pattern a bit big on me so check your measurements carefully when actually laying out the pattern.
I actually made a full panier (http://www.simplicity.com/p-1953-costumes.aspx) instead of pocket hoops.

Useful links I found:
http://fuchsias18thcdress.wordpress.com/
http://demodecouture.com/projects/francaise2/
http://www.koshka-the-cat.com/eighteenth_century.html
http://www.marquise.de/en/1700/howto/frauen/contouche.shtml

Tips for wearing:

IMO the dress bodice needs some light boning to keep it from crumpling (you can see in my pics that it's wrinkling; I added boning as a result), so if the pattern you use doesn't call for boning just add some.

I found that attaching the stomacher using pins can be difficult and annoying so after wearing the dress once I've added heavy-duty hooks and eyes to fasten it instead. Not period, but just easier to wear.

Similarly, I found on my first wearing that after a few hours I had bruises on my hipbones, so I added strong hooks to the sides of the stays to support the weight of the panier and skirts. (They need to be STRONG hooks, and sew through all layers of the stays!)

ShinobiXikyu
10-04-2010, 05:10 PM
Man I'm pumped for debuting my medieval costume. I finally finished the embroidery on the cloak after two long months of spending several hours a day stitching it in. And I'll be finishing it off entirely on Wednesday. ^_^ Pics will certainly be uploaded. Then I have to concentrate on a much more difficult hurdle; the girdle book. I'm not certain if my plan would make it strong enough to hang from a belt (I filled in a small blank hardcover sketchbook, and plan to glue leatherlook vinyl over the cover that'll be decorated, and the cover shaped to taper off at the bottom into the braided cord used to hang it from the belt. I may also stick some wires inside the braid to strengthen it.) My main fear is that the vinyl on the cover will tear off, not the cord.
Any suggestions? or are my worries unfounded?

Brsis
10-04-2010, 06:32 PM
I've sometimes done small books hanging from waistbands/belts for odd costumes (Usually I use unusually small prayer books that I pick up from second hand stalls - they look old and awesome, but I wish I had the patience to fill out a whole sketchbook like you did!) and usually I pass the cord down between the binding and the spine, and then loop it either around the spine and back up to the top or between the pages and back up - or both. This seems to be pretty sturdy.

ShinobiXikyu
10-04-2010, 06:48 PM
I'm thinking I would glue wires to the binding of the book (under the original cover's spine), and extend it through/into the braid that would have more wires. Though I'm not sure what glue to use, but I could probably figure it out at a hardware store. Think that'd hold as well? I'm afraid if I put a loop that goes around the whole spine, it'll tear. And I don't want to put it between the pages, since it's already hard to keep the book closed (I actually need to let it sit a few days with the pages being squashed flat again under a five-pound 3000-page, fancy-as-fuck-and-totally-awesome old dictionary I own).
And yeah, the book took me ten months to complete, and it's full of all kinds of stuff, translated largely into Latin. I had fun doing it and it's sentimental value to me is through the roof, but I am going to be SO glad when it's finished. I haven't had ink-free hands in months.

ShinobiXikyu
10-06-2010, 07:06 PM
Kinda spamming here, but, woohoo, the cloak's finally done after two months and a week. I'm so proud. http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2731225/

DeviousDybbuk
10-06-2010, 07:08 PM
I just made an 18th century ballgown (http://www.flickr.com/photos/64298480@N00/4665215768/in/set-72157624192653022/) earlier this year; I did some modifications as it's a fantasy version, but had to do a lot of research nonetheless.

Patterns I recommend:
http://www.jpryan.com/ladiespatterns.html
I made the half-boned stays as I wanted a more fashionable conical rather than tubular shape; I found the pattern a bit big on me so check your measurements carefully when actually laying out the pattern.
I actually made a full panier (http://www.simplicity.com/p-1953-costumes.aspx) instead of pocket hoops.

Useful links I found:
http://fuchsias18thcdress.wordpress.com/
http://demodecouture.com/projects/francaise2/
http://www.koshka-the-cat.com/eighteenth_century.html
http://www.marquise.de/en/1700/howto/frauen/contouche.shtml

Tips for wearing:

IMO the dress bodice needs some light boning to keep it from crumpling (you can see in my pics that it's wrinkling; I added boning as a result), so if the pattern you use doesn't call for boning just add some.

I found that attaching the stomacher using pins can be difficult and annoying so after wearing the dress once I've added heavy-duty hooks and eyes to fasten it instead. Not period, but just easier to wear.

Similarly, I found on my first wearing that after a few hours I had bruises on my hipbones, so I added strong hooks to the sides of the stays to support the weight of the panier and skirts. (They need to be STRONG hooks, and sew through all layers of the stays!)
Thank you for all the tips and website links~! I'll be sure to put them to good use :)

ShinobiXikyu
11-04-2010, 11:57 PM
Necroing to gush over how proud I am over my finished costume. I got quite a cool photoshoot done on Halloween. ^__^ It involved old chuchyards and gigantic gothic cathedrals...
http://www.cosplay.com/gallery/196429/
Also, the girdle book held up very well, but I lost one of the metal corners. Luckily it's an easy fix. But I guess I need a better glue...and I need to file the edges down, because I nearly cut myself on them.

Ironhill
11-05-2010, 09:49 PM
Very nice work. I didn't realize the symbols were so big. I esp. like the pics of you kneeling with the bottom fanned out.

ShinobiXikyu
11-05-2010, 11:36 PM
Yeah, they're four inches in diameter, 72 of them in total (and hand-embroidered, weeee!). And thanks. I had to do those pictures by kneeling on the ground (and we thought we'd have to put something down because it had snowed a few hours before, but it dried out fast enough, luckily), and my boyfriend/photographer spreading it out for me. But it certainly worked like a charm. Half-circle cloaks always fan out so prettily.

supergeekgirl
11-08-2010, 11:21 AM
Well, hi there! I'm another costumer who enjoys doing historical. In fact, I met some of you at Costume-Con this past year. Working on World War II uniforms for CC this year.

I'm having a lot of trouble finding books on WWII uniforms (Soviet and American, and especially 1945 dress uniforms for WAC and NKVD). I don't want to blind buy, but no library or store seems to have them. Anyone have a good recommendation?

Ironhill
11-08-2010, 11:58 PM
Have you tried the Osprey military books? I am using them to make my Revolutionary War uniform for CC. The details they have are very good. Their website is ospreypublishing.com.

You know, since I will be competing against you at CC, I probabilly shouldn't have told you about Osprey. lol

supergeekgirl
11-09-2010, 09:52 AM
Haha! We're basically novice-level costumers who have to compete as masters in the historical due to an unforeseen Best in Show win last year, so you probably have nothing to worry about. Also, we're doing this year's entry more for the fun of making the costumes and doing the skit than to do something complicated for a win.

Thanks! I'll check them out. I'm afraid to go buy something off of Amazon because it could be utter crap, you know?

Ironhill
11-09-2010, 10:49 PM
I know what you mean. I bought stuff I thought was cool online but when I got it I couldn't believe I how crappy it was. I've seen Osprey books at hobby and game stores. The wargamers buy them as painting guides.

nessabutterfly
11-11-2010, 02:21 AM
Love, love, love historical costumes. I've only done one accurately. Or at least accurate as far as the character design would allow. My Haru from The Cat Returns is heavily influenced by Elizabethan fashion, so I made everything as accurate to the time period as I could. That outfit nearly killed me though. My first corset, first time working with steel boning, TONS of hand-sewing, and the RUFFS! But it came out wonderful and got me a best in show! Megacon was the land of hoopskirts this year!

I've done quite a few other historic inspired costumes that weren't anywhere near accurate, but were fun. Shuurei is based on an ancient Chinese royal outfit. It was one of my first costumes though, and I cringe now when I look at it.

I pulled together 27 costumes for our theatre group's production of Three Musketeers. It was a comical version, so they didn't care if they weren't actually accurate. I had a month and a $250 budget though. That just about killed me! But it also made me realized that I desperately want to take some historical costuming classes. It'll have to wait until my kids are in school though. Sigh...


I have some historical costumes coming up in my plans too. Satine's red dress from Moulin Rouge. So excited, but terrified at the same time. And I also want to tackle Fran's red sequined dress from Strictly Ballroom. That dress might just kill me. I'll probably wait on that one until I'm only doing one or two costumes a year. Because I'm sure I could be sequining that thing for MONTHS!

supergeekgirl
11-11-2010, 10:06 AM
I've done quite a few other historic inspired costumes that weren't anywhere near accurate, but were fun. Shuurei is based on an ancient Chinese royal outfit. It was one of my first costumes though, and I cringe now when I look at it.


I had to check it out because I LOVE Saiunkoku! That's lovely! I can see that you've improved since then, but it's still a nice Shuurei. :)

I've said forever that I'm going to do a Chinese wedding set with the embroidered robe, the bead veil, etc. on me and that huge and awesome bow on my husband. Chinese wedding outfits have a very specific look that I've always wanted to replicate, and they leave a little room for creativity. Don't know when that will happen, though.

nessabutterfly
11-14-2010, 01:36 PM
Supergeekgirl-- thanks. At least I'm still proud of the wig!


Here's a question: Has anyone ever sneezed while wearing a corset? I did in my Elizabethan one yesterday and I thought I was going to DIE for a second. I'm pretty sure I have bruised ribs now! I had no idea how much your ribcage expands when you sneeze until then. OH MY GOODNESS-- crushing pain!!

Tonksie
11-16-2010, 02:34 PM
I'm attempting my first historical costume this year! It is going to be a world of warcraft NPC altered to be more historically accurate. I'm going to go with an early bustle victorian style dress and bodice. I'm excited and nervous! I picked up my bustle pattern and hoop wire from Truly Victorian and am hoping to start it this weekend. Gotta start with the right underwear!

deathsangel
11-16-2010, 10:17 PM
Well, hi there! I'm another costumer who enjoys doing historical. In fact, I met some of you at Costume-Con this past year. Working on World War II uniforms for CC this year.

I'm having a lot of trouble finding books on WWII uniforms (Soviet and American, and especially 1945 dress uniforms for WAC and NKVD). I don't want to blind buy, but no library or store seems to have them. Anyone have a good recommendation?

You can join the axis history forums. They havea section there about reenactment. They have tons of accurate references and some people might be able to help you.

supergeekgirl
11-17-2010, 12:29 PM
You can join the axis history forums. They havea section there about reenactment. They have tons of accurate references and some people might be able to help you.

I use links on there all the time for writing fanfic, actually. Thanks!

Annwyn
11-21-2010, 03:52 AM
I am a huge fan of historical costuming. I grew up in a family of Civil War reenactors, and later in life I joined the SCA, in which I am currently active. I love basically every period, though I'm quite partial to Medieval and Victorian.
Historical fashion is where I learned most of my sewing techniques and developed the skills I have today. I've made functional reenactment garb since I was a child, and now I work full time on my own fashion line, which is highly influenced by historical fashion. And of course, I still make SCA garb for myself and my friends and customers. My most recent is a Tang Dynasty Chinese ensemble. I love branching out beyond the popular and expected, though I do love my cotehardies and bliauts quite a lot.

You can see some of my historical costumes in the Costuming section on my website:
http://daisyviktoria.com

Brsis
11-21-2010, 03:37 PM
Anyone have any ideas on how I would look into historical Indian clothing?

I've had a potential commission request from someone who wants something 'Indian-style' (I still haven't quite figured out what this means...) but isn't massively keen on modern styles, doesn't know anything about the history, and the Indian subcontinent is the part of Asia I know nothing about. If anyone can even flag up the names of some eras or styles that were particularly pretty (Or extravagant and floofy, I like floofy) I'll give trawling Google another go.

I have a sneaky feeling that the sari/salwar kameez/other things I have forgotten the name of and probably misspell and mispronounce/etcetera are styles that have been around for a long time and she's out of luck, but I should put up a token show of effort before giving up since it's a friend of a friend I'm somewhat obligated to.

nessabutterfly
11-21-2010, 11:18 PM
Anyone have any ideas on how I would look into historical Indian clothing?

I've had a potential commission request from someone who wants something 'Indian-style' (I still haven't quite figured out what this means...) but isn't massively keen on modern styles, doesn't know anything about the history, and the Indian subcontinent is the part of Asia I know nothing about. If anyone can even flag up the names of some eras or styles that were particularly pretty (Or extravagant and floofy, I like floofy) I'll give trawling Google another go.

I have a sneaky feeling that the sari/salwar kameez/other things I have forgotten the name of and probably misspell and mispronounce/etcetera are styles that have been around for a long time and she's out of luck, but I should put up a token show of effort before giving up since it's a friend of a friend I'm somewhat obligated to.

Any chance that the "modern" styles she's not a fan of are the tunic and pants? I'm pretty sure that's a much newer style than the traditonal Sari. At least that's how it seemed when I lived in an area where Indians were far from the minority. The older women wore traditional Saris and occasionally the pants and tunics, but the younger women wore very fitted tunics, often sleeveless, and much gaudier than the saris. I did a fair bit of research on saris last year when my husband bought me one. There are a lot of different styles of traditional Indian clothing. I wish I remembered the sites I researched it on. One style that may also be older is the choli (half-shirt that is usually worn under the sari) paired instead with a really full long skirt-- lehenga.

Well, a quick look at the Wikipedia article about Sari http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sari shows that they've been worn for over 4000 years. There might be some other historic Indian clothing, but I would definitely not call a Sari modern at all!

Brsis
11-22-2010, 04:04 AM
I always assumed it was regional, since the salwar kahmeez (Am I even spelling that right?) gets worn almost exclusively in the Pakistani/Punjabi communities around where I live and saris seem to be more 'mainland' Indian, but I could be wrong.

I have a sneaky feeling that by 'modern styles' she means 'what her husband's family wears' which, judging by the wedding photos, is either-or. I have a feeling she's just not into bright colours or something like that.

nessabutterfly
11-22-2010, 09:59 AM
I always assumed it was regional, since the salwar kahmeez (Am I even spelling that right?) gets worn almost exclusively in the Pakistani/Punjabi communities around where I live and saris seem to be more 'mainland' Indian, but I could be wrong.

I have a sneaky feeling that by 'modern styles' she means 'what her husband's family wears' which, judging by the wedding photos, is either-or. I have a feeling she's just not into bright colours or something like that.

Maybe she doesn't like the gaudy polyester ones? Or the ones with plastic sequins? There are a lot of that style floating around, and I can see why she wouldn't want that. The silk Saris are beautiful though.

I finally remembered the site we bought my sari from: http://www.sareeworld.com/ if you look on the left, there are traditional, party, contemporary, and so on. I would guess that she is turned off by the contemporary ones as they have a lot of excessive decoration, where the traditional ones are much plainer, and often more subdued colours or textures (though not always).

You might send your friend a link to the site and see if anything there appeals to her. A sari is sold as a piece of fabric. You can pay extra to have them make the choli for you (the sewing quality isn't amazing though-- I wish I had sewn my own), and pre-sew the bottom of the sari so you don't have to refold the pleats every time you wear it, but the price listed is for the fabric alone. It's actually a pretty good price for the amount of fabric you're getting. I don't know of any place that's not specifically selling saris that is going to have this sort of fabric selection.

Sarcasm-hime
11-22-2010, 12:15 PM
Perhaps she would be more into the folkloric-type styles? There's less 'modern' looking tie-dyed fabrics and mirrorwork on those. (Search for Rajasthan, Gujarat, Bandhni/Bandhani)

Brsis
11-22-2010, 12:35 PM
I'll give those a go, cheers!

@nessabutterfly - I have no. freaking. idea what she doesn't like about them (In the wedding photos her mother-in-law is wearing seven yards of aubergine coloured silk and rocking it, I cannot comprehend of a person who would not want to give that a go) and I have a sneaky feeling neither does she and nothing at all is going to come of this. But I only take commissions off friends and friends-of-friends and people who vaguely know me through Drama Soc, so I feel obliged to try my best in preparation for the possible day when I have to deal with 'real' customers...

Adorima
08-16-2011, 12:47 AM
I'll interject into the convo (even though I know you're talking about something else) what I'm planning on doing someday:

Historical Gypsy: http://rlv.zcache.com/vintage_turquoise_gypsy_girl_poster-p228717929430782032tdcp_400.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_RdrRr4auhAY/S1twsn8m06I/AAAAAAAADQE/YayPNNN5wgo/s400/gypsy+girl+redwhite.bmp

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/85/William-Adolphe_Bouguereau_%281825-1905%29_-_Gypsy_Girl_with_a_Basque_Drum_%281867%29.jpg/600px-William-Adolphe_Bouguereau_%281825-1905%29_-_Gypsy_Girl_with_a_Basque_Drum_%281867%29.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17CFKRwNd-0 And the hair of the gypsy in 2:30.

I used to always do a wannabe gypsy outfit when I was younger. It consisted of an off-white "lattice"-woven button-up dress, a dark green paisley shawl/wrap around by hips and waist which I knotted at the hip, lots of bangles from my mom (jade, gold wooden), lots of necklaces especially with moon and lotus motifs, huge gold hoop earrings and my hair tied back in a red scarf. It was awesomeness. But I'd like to make something more accurate in the future.

I'll look for it if it's already here, but if not, are those images I provided pretty accurate to a gypsy of 1100-1400's? Or do you guys know of another website that does?

It didn't seem like the outfit changed too much. There's a lot of layering going on with the skirts and accessories, wild hair...etc.

But if you know better than please tell me!

Mangochutney
08-16-2011, 01:32 AM
Something in here will probably be useful to you: head scarf tying instructions (http://www.tznius.com/cgi-bin/tying.pl). A lot of these wraps haven't changed much in centuries, and were used by women over a wide geographic area including eastern Europe, northern Africa, and the Middle East--just about right for Romani of your time period there. Different groups had different degrees of emphasis on hiding the hair, of course. If you're in doubt, it's rarely improper to hide it.

Adorima
08-16-2011, 11:35 PM
Thanks Mango, those head-scarfs are very pretty! And I will make a note of researching different tribes of Romani/gypsy people...very interesting.

alpha_helix
08-17-2011, 10:10 AM
Oh, Mango, thanks for the link! I often wear head scarves as part of my everyday street clothes, but I've been blindly guessing on how to tie them. I wanna try the "butterfly" style, looks purdy!

Mangochutney
08-17-2011, 12:46 PM
It does, and scarves don't get tangled and manky. I should wear them more often. I also found this Regency-era turban-wrapping tutorial (http://www.lynnmcmasters.com/Turbansecond.html), which might be handier to you than the OP.

Flora88
08-17-2011, 03:23 PM
It does, and scarves don't get tangled and manky. I should wear them more often. I also found this Regency-era turban-wrapping tutorial (http://www.lynnmcmasters.com/Turbansecond.html), which might be handier to you than the OP.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS.