PDA

View Full Version : which is more steampunk


JTC
11-23-2009, 01:32 PM
Hello
Could you all please comment which of these outputs has more of a steampunk/neo-victorian feel and why you feel that way
Thanks

http://www.flickr.com/photos/43603856@N05/4125764753/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/43603856@N05/4120574460/

Victoria~
11-24-2009, 03:56 PM
i think the black and white one has a more steam-punk feel because it makes the picture seem older, and your (or whoever is in the photo's) hair is purple/blue-ish and that doesn't seem very steam-punk too me, the outfit is very nice though.

Aryante
11-24-2009, 03:59 PM
Definitely the black and white. But just as a suggestion, have you tried sepia? That always looks best in my opnion :)

JTC
11-24-2009, 04:54 PM
Thanks for the input,
The models hair is purple so that is accurate though it shows blacker in lower light.I am the photographer the model is Eerie Twilight ( her stage name ) I did try sepia,cyanotype and bleach bypass. I can post them if you wish but they did not seem to carry the image as well

Aryante
11-24-2009, 05:27 PM
Naw, it's fine. I just think everything looks amazing in sepia :)

JTC
11-24-2009, 05:35 PM
Naw, it's fine. I just think everything looks amazing in sepia :)

My personal favorites are Palladium prints and Van Dyke brown if you like sepia you wouldlike those prints

Aryante
11-24-2009, 05:36 PM
I've never heard of them n.n'
I'll google them after dinner :)

Kelley
11-24-2009, 05:44 PM
Personally, I feel the colour one is more Steampunk.


The thing for me is, even if you have a sepia tone lense or filter - it's not the same as Victorian photography. You just have a modern photograph... in sepia - which isn't the same for me.

To me, the coloured one just looks better. The contrast of the red and blue is great - and Steampunk is about old AND new - so I think colour is absolutely fine !

Braithcakes
11-24-2009, 05:54 PM
The color one looks more steampunk to me, since...the whole subculture of steampunk is about being old-timed, yet....new. in a steampunk world there is HIGH technology, but....everything is old-timey

think...the time machine.....or....a tesla coil gun :D

I really like the slightly washed out dulled down colored :3

JTC
11-24-2009, 08:00 PM
Thanks our lady C and Braithcakes. Lady C I agree nothing digital would ever have the exact look of the old wet plate processes but I do not have access to a darkroom where I could do those anymore. Braithcakes I will try dialing the saturation back a bit on it as you suggested and see how that looks . I do appreciate everyones input so far

For those that wanted to see it in sepia

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2485/4132660642_9b3e7f0a64_b.jpg

Braithcakes
11-24-2009, 08:20 PM
=] I love darkrooms, just built one into my boyfriend's home last week =.= him and his old ways of photography

Kelley
11-24-2009, 08:38 PM
You can simulate the look to a degree, digitally. It's just more complex than simply setting to sepia.


Also, you have to be holding a pose or expression you could have held - this being about three to ten minutes of sitting still. This is why they didn't often smile in photographs.

I feel that taking that into account when taking the pictures helps very much if you're trying to simulate an "old picture" look. Smiling and active poses just look wrong. Just saying for future reference.


A sloshy and uneven sepia helps, too - instead of everything translated to sepia 1:1 by computer.

Also, take a look at the exposure attained in old photographs. Caucasian skin tends to "glow", as do light-coloured objects. Exposure might be uneven.


Et cetera



Also, I feel that slightly TOO saturated is somewhat appropriate to Steampunk.

JTC
11-24-2009, 08:45 PM
I thought about doing some digital TTV work on this ( by shooting the digital shot off of the focusing screen of a TLR camera ) But TLRs were much later technology and while it does give a great vintage look I did not know if it would look "steamounk" Has anyone ever done any TTV for steampunk shoots ?

JTC
11-24-2009, 08:54 PM
You can simulate the look to a degree, digitally. It's just more complex than simply setting to sepia.


Also, you have to be holding a pose or expression you could have held - this being about three to ten minutes of sitting still. This is why they didn't often smile in photographs.

I feel that taking that into account when taking the pictures helps very much if you're trying to simulate an "old picture" look. Smiling and active poses just look wrong. Just saying for future reference.


A sloshy and uneven sepia helps, too - instead of everything translated to sepia 1:1 by computer.

Also, take a look at the exposure attained in old photographs. Caucasian skin tends to "glow", as do light-coloured objects. Exposure might be uneven.


Et cetera



Also, I feel that slightly TOO saturated is somewhat appropriate to Steampunk.

Good points as the old wet plate processes did take longer exposure times but I also used Sodium suphide toners to get sepia in black and white prints from tri X or plus X negatives. There was alot of voodoo chemistry back then also I had a friend who wouls slosh a bit of coca cola into the toner to get the look he wanted of course I never saw much difference but he swore by it. We also did selenium toning but that looked redder and you could vary the amount of tone by how long you left it in the bath and by varying the bleaching

Tanoshii-Chan
11-25-2009, 09:28 AM
Hello
Could you all please comment which of these outputs has more of a steampunk/neo-victorian feel and why you feel that way
Thanks

http://www.flickr.com/photos/43603856@N05/4125764753/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/43603856@N05/4120574460/

I like the first one. It is black and white and overall has a more vintage feel.

JTC
11-25-2009, 03:49 PM
Thanks Tanoshii-Chan for looking and giving input

CezzaXV
11-26-2009, 09:29 AM
I prefer the black and white version since I dont like the colours used in the costume - they dont seem to co-ordinate very well.

I'd have an experiment with the levels and contrast in the black and white one since I think it could work quite well. Also, as a photographer, the fact that the thing she's leaning on isnt straight across the photo annoys me greatly.

JTC
11-26-2009, 02:29 PM
Ceeza
Thanks for the comment on BW vs Color. That was actually one of 5 different black and white variations on this one shotand as I am sure you can see the color one is HDR but not tonemapped in a way to make it look too false. It was done to give a bit of sureallistic look to the background. But everyone has different takes and different likes. There are some rules of posing and composition broken in the shots. As to the pose It is one of about 3 hours of poses with the model. While it is not at an angle or profile I think this model is small enough to pull it off. Yes the side stance is considered to be more masculine/dominant. With alot of models I am constantly saying "give me more toe" ( e.g point one foot more towards me to turn your body ) This model actually looked good both ways IMHO and did not need the slimming effect of only shooting angles. She also could get by showing arms which can be a problematic area. So while not technically in the "rules of posing" as its not at an angle and there is no S or C curve I felt it had a good feel. The composition does not follow the rule of thirds or even really the golden ratio. A little straightening in the crop to level the rail may be a good thing. So thanks for the input on that too many continouss hours of editing makes you miss the obvious sometime. But where even that was a hard fast composition rule 20 years ago its more accepted now. You even see photos croped on the diagonal making everything in it off level without following the golden triangle. But I agree that I should fix that. Before some of these images are submitted for a show I'll take a fresh look at them.

This was my personal favorite from the shoot. Window light as the main with fill from a single strobe shooting through an umbrella as close as possible with the light still out of frame to try to soften it a bit. But again it may not be everyones favorite and I did not process it B&W
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2742/4126628634_bcc8fea852_o.jpg

The one that I felt gave best effect of the location were these two
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2776/4119801391_7048fa494d_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2568/4120574584_5bfd558fe5_b.jpg

But still I feel after the help on the other forum question and at other sites that I need more technology to get more of a "steam" feel to them

Again thanks to everyone on both threads for your help

Jonetsu
11-26-2009, 08:09 PM
Now for something completely different... I like this one (http://www.flickr.com/photos/43603856@N05/4128180749/in/set-72157622718818977/) better than either of those for steampunk ^^;

JTC
11-27-2009, 08:04 AM
Now for something completely different... I like this one (http://www.flickr.com/photos/43603856@N05/4128180749/in/set-72157622718818977/) better than either of those for steampunk ^^;

Thanks Kitty, so another vote for color ? it seems color vs black and white is running about even. I had not done a B&W of that that shot or in fact of most of the shots in there. but the window light spilling in did catch her hair there and make it very bright. The models character is a steampunk/neovictorian spiritualist

BTW some very nice costumes in your gallery

jonnysteam
11-27-2009, 09:22 PM
Thanks for posting those pictures, its my opinion that they both look as good as each other. Because youve kept your clothing colours reasonably plain , as of the era of vege dyes etc, you can still look like the genuine article in the colour picture.
I think your corset is very fitted and accurate but , I would dress that corset with a series of brass buckle belts ,
cheers:bigtu:

JTC
11-28-2009, 01:44 PM
Thanks for posting those pictures, its my opinion that they both look as good as each other. Because youve kept your clothing colours reasonably plain , as of the era of vege dyes etc, you can still look like the genuine article in the colour picture.
I think your corset is very fitted and accurate but , I would dress that corset with a series of brass buckle belts ,
cheers:bigtu:

Thanks I will pass that on to the model. She has been given creative control over the garb I will be working to provice some props and the location for the next shoot. I am working on soemthing with a Van de Graff generator or a Wimshurst electrostatic generator along with a crystal ball for the prop for the next shoot but it may not come together in time.

Organic Armor
11-28-2009, 02:29 PM
OurladyC made some good points. I like the color one too, but to give you another option, try handpainting a B&W print. Gives an old fashioned look but has that strange alt world feeling with a lot of control over what stands out.
Some examples http://www.marielizabeth.com/hand_painted_photography.htm

JTC
11-28-2009, 05:43 PM
OurladyC made some good points. I like the color one too, but to give you another option, try handpainting a B&W print. Gives an old fashioned look but has that strange alt world feeling with a lot of control over what stands out.
Some examples http://www.marielizabeth.com/hand_painted_photography.htm

Handpainted would certainly get a feel from the vicotrian era. Does anyone know a digital process that would mimic photochrom colorized images ? That process was used the end of the 1800s and I love the look of photochrom but I have not come close to reproducing it digitally