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View Full Version : Spirited Away: No Face


Faolan
12-18-2009, 11:45 PM
http://www.onlineghibli.com/spirited_away/newimages/NoFace.jpg

After searching the forums, I can't seem to find a thread that satisfies my questions. I did find some on No Face, but I need something really basic, aha. This is the first costume I will be making alone, as my cousin usually helps me. I figure it'll be easy enough. I just have some questions for you all about the mask.

Best material to use? I was advised to use sculpy for it, and paper mache. I'm starting to think paper mache would be best, as i could use wire to mold it to whatever shape I want, while the sculpy could shift while baking if I'm not mistaken?

Also, I know the mask looks like it's just got black paint holes on it, but I obviously need to be able to see. I was thinking that I could cut holes for the eyes ( not the entire oval shape, but small holes for my eyes ), and use that black mesh under the mask that lets you see out, but no one can see in. And then paint the ovals around the circles, to make it look smoother. Er... if that makes sense.

But anyway, I'm looking for any advice you guys can give me with, and maybe some help deciding on what to make the mask out of?

MagiFox
12-19-2009, 11:55 AM
My friend actually made a No-Face for Halloween this year and she made it out of medical plaster strips. I don't think she made hole for the eyes though and she needed someone to guide her around. It would be simple to modify though. Cut out the eye holes and then cover them with a dark, but thin material so you can still see through it.

KatDJZ
12-19-2009, 12:23 PM
I'm currently working on a Barry the Chopper mask and was trying to figure out the same thing. Right now I'm working with Crayola Model Magic which seems to be working out pretty well. Its like clay, but very lightweight, so wearing it around all day should be pretty easy. You may want to check that out, and its also pretty cheap.

Sunnybrook1
03-25-2010, 08:26 PM
Threads kinda old, but if you're still looking for suggestions...

I used foam for my latest mask (the kind they use in walls, to keep the pink insulation from falling out a.k.a. smooth rigid white EPS foam) bought at my local hardware store, a started with a big sheet between 2-3 inches thick.

Cut out a rectangle slightly bigger than the size of my mask, then saw it roughly into shape with a sharp knife (DANGEROUS - use common sense!). **Note - this part can get messy, since the pieces of foam stick to anything, everything with a static charge. Better to do this step outside, or someplace with a workshop vacuum.

My mask was for visual purposes so didn't require any eye holes or facial modifications, but you could carefully dig out space for your face & cut eye-holes in the foam. I've heard Cheese-cloth is good for see-through coverage, though you may have to dye/permanent-marker it black.

After it's reached a good basic shape, it's time to pull out the sandpaper! Sand it down, starting with a lower grit (the higher the number the smaller the sand-particles, and the smoother your surface will end up) and work your way up to higher ones - I used 80, 100, 120, and 200 grit. I also used my hands for most of it, though a sandpaper-holder would've been nice. With time, effort, and patience, it will end up very smooth to the touch.

On to the painting phase - I used white gesso paint for the base, then added mixtures of black and white acrylic paint (cheapo, from the craft store) for the eyes, mouth, and cheek markings. This part was a bit nerve-wracking (my Crayola brushes didn't give me much precision) and I had to touch up spots over and over until I was satisfied, but it worked. If you want it easier, I'd try cutting out the shapes you want in paper, attaching that to masking/painters tape, then carefully cutting out the paper part, leaving an eye/mouth-shaped stencil you can lay over your mask and paint over, then remove after the paint has dried. Didn't try it myself, but I wish I had.

To prevent the foam from uncomfortably rubbing your face, hot-glue some dense foam (like the kind they use for furniture) onto the inside of the mask, about where your cheeks will be. Also, if you're strapping this to your head, I suggest hot-gluing a cardboard-rim around the inside, and attaching any stretchy-strings to that, since foam will crumble from stress concentrated on a small area.

Well, lemme know how it goes - here's a picture of my finished mask! (http://sunnybrook1.deviantart.com/art/Upgraded-No-Face-Mask-141617462)