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cachalot
07-19-2010, 07:31 PM
Yay new historical costuming forum!

I read through the threads and see that most of them have to do with Western dress, whereas my interests for historical costuming lie mostly in the sphere of historical Asian dress. I've been scouring the internet for a while to find any information at all on historical Asian dress, mostly from Japan and China, and there is not very much of it out there. Here are some resources I have found, which are mostly overviews:

Evolution and Revolution (http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/hsc/evrev/): Chinese dress 1700s-1900s

The Costume Museum: Rebirth of the Tale of Genji (http://www.iz2.or.jp/english/): historical Japanese dress from Jomon through Edo period (some info on Meji period also). This is the official site of a costume/historical clothing museum in Kyoto.

"Ethnic" Costuming (http://www.costumebase.org/en/ethno/): mostly Japanese with some information on historical Chinese garb

Chinese Opera Costumes (http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/portfolio/ricky/opera.htm): with good photos

World Costume Links: Asia (http://www.filmcostume.com/Links%20World.htm) has a huge page of links to different sites, though some of them appear to be broken and many others are just Wikipedia pages, which aren't very helpful.

Ancient Chinese Clothing (http://library.thinkquest.org/20443/g_clothing.html): A short page overview

Chinese Clothing forum (http://www.chinese-tools.com/forum/read.html?q=18%2C25821%2Cpage%3D1): Some good discussion on ancient Chinese dress

Anyone have other links? Or information on good historical Asian clothing books?

sylf
07-23-2010, 03:17 AM
Hmm, really interesting... I've been vaguely looking into the area of chinese hanfu/qipao ever since I got obsessed with Pet shop of Horrors (if you've read that, Count D = so bishounen <3). But information on chinese clothing is hard to find if you can't read chinese characters. I wonder if you might also know anything about... resources on how to style your hair when wearing these things? I can ask my relatives to buy qipao, but what to do with my hair... ><

supergeekgirl
07-23-2010, 11:24 AM
I've done a bit of historical Asian costuming (Japanese although I've started research into Chinese wedding outfits), and I'll have to post some of my kabuki info links at some point.

We won Best in Class - Documentation and Best in Show - Presentation at Costume-Con last year.

Anyway, here's a link one of my geisha-performer friends gave me for styling a momoware (half peach) Japanese hairstyle: http://kurokami-kanzashi.deviantart.com/gallery/#/dosz33

Lycorisa
07-23-2010, 02:22 PM
I love the chinese hanfu clothing! Yea..I watched too much chinese movies xD. I did one hanfu but I'm not sure if it was historically accurate. There are so many different types of hanfu kinda confusing :\

costumemercenar
08-12-2010, 12:29 AM
[Quote]I watched too much chinese movies [/url]

I saw the costumes from The Banquet and The Warlords in exhibition and have some photos on my blog (http://costumemercenary.blogspot.com/2010/05/exhibition-of-costumes-from-banquet-and.html).

Also did some photos of two wuxia-inspired costumes (http://costumemercenary.blogspot.com/2010/03/red-wuxia-robes.html) if you care to have a gander...

I suppose for me the problem with cosplaying characters from wuxia dramas is that their costumes don't tend to be particularly distinctive. The sheer number of drama adaptions mean the characters have quite an extensive wardrobe and no iconic outfit. I mean, the closest to an iconic one I can think of is Xiao Long Nu, who always wears white (as described in the novel and in the half a dozen tv series) but she's pictured in pink in the anime (Legend of the Condor Hero).

Mangochutney
08-12-2010, 01:22 PM
I'm really interested in Korean historical dress, and while it's a LITTLE easier to find info on it's still not particularly easy unless you're much better at reading Korean than I am. I found an absolutely indispensible video that shows how to style some of the really intensive women's 'dos for court, and a few less-formal ones. Korean style has heavy Chinese influence at various periods, so it might help if you're more interested in that region too.

http://koreanhistory.info/hairstyles.htm

Also a very helpful page on Heian-era kimono (@#$% GOREGEOUS, a dream outfit for me): http://www.clotheslinejournal.com/heian.html

Sarcasm-hime
08-15-2010, 08:20 PM
OMG Mango, that video is awesome and will be super useful for when I get around to doing that Hwang Jin-Yi costume. I am amused at how most seem to be "put your hair in a bun. Now put tons of giant stuff on your head."

I did a rather ghetto fantasy Heian a few years ago and would like to redo it properly...but the amount of hemming involved is daunting. I recall wanting to kill myself after sitting at the machine forever; unending straight seams/hems are my least favourite thing to sew.

Chocolahime
08-17-2010, 09:43 PM
I am a Chinese student and I love the Tang Dynasty. I am really hoping that I will have the opportunity to make a historical dress for a project... My Chinese isn't very good but since I am aiming to be a translator one day perhaps I can try and translate any information I come across.
I'll post here if I do, but don't expect it to be too good :( Sorry

tifaia
08-22-2010, 12:13 AM
I stumbled upon these links a few days ago for Tsumami Kanzashi hair ornaments (needed to make for a costume). Hopefully they haven't been posted elsewhere around here, but figured this would be a great place to stick them to help anyone in need:

http://www.cutoutandkeep.net/projects/tsunami_kanzashi_flower_2

http://www.mookychick.co.uk/diy_ethic/kanzashi_tutorial.php

BTW Mango, awesome link. Saving that for future reference.

爱 Linh
09-04-2010, 03:08 PM
There's a hanfu facebook group =]
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2204561358#!/group.php?gid=2204561358&v=wall

Gingersweet
09-04-2010, 11:12 PM
This is a fantastic little home-made vid on how to tie the ribbons on a jeogori. It helped me a lot when I was making my own, even though it just shows you how to tie it properly.

Korean Hanbok - How to Tie an Otkorum (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5uwVlBrAq0)

Gingersweet
09-04-2010, 11:17 PM
I am a Chinese student... My Chinese isn't very good but since I am aiming to be a translator one day perhaps I can try and translate any information I come across.
Chinese students UNITE! -high fives-

I am also studying Chinese, though its just for fun and personal reasons and whatnot on my part. <3

sylf
09-05-2010, 04:22 AM
I am amused at how most seem to be "put your hair in a bun. Now put tons of giant stuff on your head."

Lol, I know... Well, from the video, looks like if I want a "bun" like that it'll have to be fake hair. I reckon back in the days when women never had a haircut in their life, they could mound their hair up that big, but we simply don't have the hair for that. My mum used to joke that women left their hair in those buns all the time and never took them apart.. so bugs would take up residence in there. ><;

Thanks for the facebook tip - this group seems to have lots of nice reference photos for women's hanfu (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=31188076&fbid=1483653464149&op=1&o=global&view=global&subj=201125212358&id=1618250546#!/group.php?gid=201125212358&v=photos) too.
I so wanna do something like this! (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=31188076&fbid=1483653464149&op=1&o=global&view=global&subj=201125212358&id=1618250546)

EDIT: I lie! A bit of googling with Chinese keywords comes up with tutorials for your own hair!

http://hi.baidu.com/%B1%CB%B0%B6%D1%A9_%B3%BE/blog/item/e6f3b361589140d1e7113a82.html

Ayekasong
09-07-2010, 07:29 PM
I'm really interested in Korean historical dress, and while it's a LITTLE easier to find info on it's still not particularly easy unless you're much better at reading Korean than I am. I found an absolutely indispensible video that shows how to style some of the really intensive women's 'dos for court, and a few less-formal ones. Korean style has heavy Chinese influence at various periods, so it might help if you're more interested in that region too.

http://koreanhistory.info/hairstyles.htm

Also a very helpful page on Heian-era kimono (@#$% GOREGEOUS, a dream outfit for me): http://www.clotheslinejournal.com/heian.html

I'm late to the party, but I wanted to give you a heads up that I found a fantastic book on Korean clothing called "Traditional Korean Costume" on Amazon. It's pricey, but there are nice diagrams of the clothing and accessories.

I've also come across some nice general Asian costume books by Young Y. Chung. They mostly delve into textiles and embroidery, but her books do provide a great deal of information and photos.

Sarcasm-hime
09-07-2010, 09:39 PM
Lol, I know... Well, from the video, looks like if I want a "bun" like that it'll have to be fake hair. I reckon back in the days when women never had a haircut in their life, they could mound their hair up that big, but we simply don't have the hair for that. My mum used to joke that women left their hair in those buns all the time and never took them apart.. so bugs would take up residence in there. ><;

EDIT: I lie! A bit of googling with Chinese keywords comes up with tutorials for your own hair!

http://hi.baidu.com/%B1%CB%B0%B6%D1%A9_%B3%BE/blog/item/e6f3b361589140d1e7113a82.html

I suspect that even back in the day a lot of rich women would have hairpieces; Victorian ladies had super long hair too but many wore extra 'switches' to puff out their hairdos. There are some hairstyles so big that no human has enough hair on their own. ;D I had a mini-epiphany awhile back when I realized that Princess Leia was wearing hairpieces. LOL I grew up with her as my hair idol...

Whoa, that link is great! I'm definitely going to try some of these!

Nefertieh
03-11-2012, 05:28 AM
Lol, I know... Well, from the video, looks like if I want a "bun" like that it'll have to be fake hair. I reckon back in the days when women never had a haircut in their life, they could mound their hair up that big, but we simply don't have the hair for that. My mum used to joke that women left their hair in those buns all the time and never took them apart.. so bugs would take up residence in there. ><;


Han Chinese did indeed not cut their hair. The philosophy behind it was from Confucius, who said "we are given our body, skin and hair from our parents; which we ought not to damage. This idea is the quintessential of filial duty."

The common pictures of Chinese men with queues and shaven front of their hair are actually Manchu, who had imposed their own ethnic clothing through brutal means when they came into power in the 1600s.