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fechan
10-18-2010, 10:48 AM
(I hope this hasn't been posted before but I counted find anything with the search or in the sticky list of threads.)

Excuse me while I rant/wonder about the supposed Power of homemade food.

I've seen it in so many diet documentation, and it seems to be a common belief that homemade food is a key to eating healthy (thus loosing weight). At first glance it seems like sound advice. However that advice is often put into a context which really makes me wonder, such as the classic 'EAT HOMEMADE SALAD INSTEAD OF YOUR REGULAR MEAL OF DEEP FRIED TAKE OUT AND YOU'LL LOOSE WEIGHT MAGICALLY!' Well, obviously.

I cook a lot at home and I know for a fact that there are many, many ways to make a recipe more unhealthy than what you get at a sit-down restaurant. On my favourite recipe website I constantly see enormous amount of sugar in pretty much any recipe (desert, main course, snacks). From experience and experimenting I eventually manage to find the right amount of sugar a certain recipe requires to taste good (usually a lot less than the original recipe).

At the risk of sounding like an old lady, I think that new generations have less cooking knowledge than they used to. Personally, I was never taught how to cook and what I know now was through many years of hard work starting from nothing. Just to name a few other examples: on my favourite recipe website I was unable to find a cake recipe that did not include a cake mix or a pudding mix in the ingredients, in my country the education system used to include cooking lessons to students and they were removed and you can buy almost anything already made frozen or fresh at the grocery store (discouraging you from making it yourself). Enough about that. ;)

That being said, how IS the regular person supposed to know, apart from the obvious, what is a healthy recipe and what is not.

I just finished making my very first pizza entirely homemade (crust and everything) and, at first, I felt no guilt eating it but then I started to wonder... is it healthy just because I made it?

Mariks_Dragon
10-18-2010, 12:31 PM
I make all of my own food. I love cooking and baking.

RaDragon76
10-18-2010, 12:34 PM
I'm not sure I can answer you question directly other than to say if you cook at home you are better able to control what goes into food preperation. I do know that when I had to cut back on going out to eat and started cooking/eating more at home while also cutting back on snacks and soda I lost a lot of weight. Once I was able to start going out to eat again I gained back what I had lost plus a few pounds more. At the moment I'm going back to home cooked meals, plenty of excercise and less snacks/sodas in the hopes that it'll bring my weight back down again.

Lovelychristina
10-18-2010, 01:11 PM
Home cooking Vs Restaurant food? Well I would say they are about the same thing. My dad used to eat out a lot when he was in the navy and weighed 132 soak n' wet. He Met my mom and over 29 years gain weigh on her "home cooked" Cooked meals He topped out at 356 until he went on a diet. He now weighs 264 and that is Because he watched what he ate and portion size. Again My Opinion? they are bout the same.

fechan
10-18-2010, 01:29 PM
I'm not sure I can answer you question directly other than to say if you cook at home you are better able to control what goes into food preperation. I do know that when I had to cut back on going out to eat and started cooking/eating more at home while also cutting back on snacks and soda I lost a lot of weight. Once I was able to start going out to eat again I gained back what I had lost plus a few pounds more. At the moment I'm going back to home cooked meals, plenty of excercise and less snacks/sodas in the hopes that it'll bring my weight back down again.

Thanks for replying!

I agree it's easier to control but I find it's hard to tell between regular recipes what is best. I think that diet recipe books or just systematically using wheat flour/honey/olive oil is not possible for every recipe.


Home cooking Vs Restaurant food? Well I would say they are about the same thing. My dad used to eat out a lot when he was in the navy and weighed 132 soak n' wet. He Met my mom and over 29 years gain weigh on her "home cooked" Cooked meals He topped out at 356 until he went on a diet. He now weighs 264 and that is Because he watched what he ate and portion size. Again My Opinion? they are bout the same.

We're usually led to think otherwise but to know of a real example of this happening is very interresting. It definitely makes me wonder what I can do in the kitchen to prevent this.

InkyDoo
10-18-2010, 01:30 PM
It depends on what you cook at home and how you prepared it. My dad makes his food extremely greasy, buttery and fattening. My mom on the other hand makes a lot of salads, soups and if she does fry its usually with olive oil or lesser fat substitute. I'm so glad my mom is the top chef in the kitchen.

Most fast food or restaurants tend to have foods that are high in sodium and preservatives and I think this might be what they are comparing it too but if you have someone who likes to have a lot of salt on whatever they eat then eating home may not make the difference.

I usually drop 8-10 pounds just staying at home and eating what my mom preps because she cooks healthy but like I mention before I think its how you cook your meals at home.

I cook at home and even then I swap out rice noodles for wheat noodles to make it more filling and healthy. Make my salad with Romaine or dark green lettuce versus iceberg lettuce. Just by swapping ingredients or even making the portion a little smaller helps with dieting.

Chocolahime
10-18-2010, 01:36 PM
Well I think the assumption is that if you are making your own food as well as trying to lose weight you would probably try not to make the food unhealthy.
Keep in mind that it's easy to just eat something in a restaurant without caring what is in it but when you are the one putting a half brick of butter into something you might think twice before having seconds... I know I do.

Either way the way you learn to cook is to ask how. Go get lessons ask a grandma, there are a billion ways to do it. I don't think people have lost the ability to cook nowadays by magic, it's just laziness.

fechan
10-18-2010, 01:56 PM
It depends on what you cook at home and how you prepared it. My dad makes his food extremely greasy, buttery and fattening. My mom on the other hand makes a lot of salads, soups and if she does fry its usually with olive oil or lesser fat substitute. I'm so glad my mom is the top chef in the kitchen.
(...)
I cook at home and even then I swap out rice noodles for wheat noodles to make it more filling and healthy. Make my salad with Romaine or dark green lettuce versus iceberg lettuce. Just by swapping ingredients or even making the portion a little smaller helps with dieting.

I avoid deep fried or greasy food but I generally eat white flour and rye or white bread.

I try to swap some ingredients when I can and know it won't affect the chemical reaction of the recipe (ever tried to caramelize onions with olive oil?) but I always wonder at the subtilities. For example, I often make muffins to bring to work and have for breakfast. How do I know if it's better or worse to use low-fat yogurt in them or not, or if I should put oatmeal in them... @__@
Maybe I'm thinking too hard about it...? I just want to eat the healthiest possible without completely changing everything I eat. (I mean forgetting all the recipes I ever tried and stick to stuff from a diet recipe book.)

fechan
10-18-2010, 02:01 PM
Well I think the assumption is that if you are making your own food as well as trying to lose weight you would probably try not to make the food unhealthy.
Keep in mind that it's easy to just eat something in a restaurant without caring what is in it but when you are the one putting a half brick of butter into something you might think twice before having seconds... I know I do.

Either way the way you learn to cook is to ask how. Go get lessons ask a grandma, there are a billion ways to do it. I don't think people have lost the ability to cook nowadays by magic, it's just laziness.

I grew up with people who don't know how to cook. I spent my childhood cooking my own meals with canned soup and mac & cheese. Even today, I only have one friend who is really interested in cooking and she only got interested after her boyfriend taught her.
It's laziness, maybe, but also easy access to processed food and lack of passing on the knowledge by family members. At least, it's how it is for me.

distantarray
10-18-2010, 02:10 PM
Home cooking Vs Restaurant food? Well I would say they are about the same thing. My dad used to eat out a lot when he was in the navy and weighed 132 soak n' wet. He Met my mom and over 29 years gain weigh on her "home cooked" Cooked meals He topped out at 356 until he went on a diet. He now weighs 264 and that is Because he watched what he ate and portion size. Again My Opinion? they are bout the same.

Home cooking usually favors comfort foods which is often heavily fattening etc, although you can control more of what goes in, personally I prefer home food cause I can control a lot like high fructose corn syrup, msg, not using hormone injected carbon monoxide treated anti-biotic induced meats.

Of course in your dad's case you have to factor in your dad was also in the navy and quite active in the service, can't really compare the two if your dad has become inactive and gotten older which lowers his hormone balance through age and sedimentary lifestyle.

All in all it's what you make it of, but chances are if you know how to cook and know how to cook healthy foods you have better and more control at what you eat at home, just don't lean towards comfort foods all the time.

Chocolahime
10-18-2010, 02:20 PM
I grew up with people who don't know how to cook. I spent my childhood cooking my own meals with canned soup and mac & cheese. Even today, I only have one friend who is really interested in cooking and she only got interested after her boyfriend taught her.
It's laziness, maybe, but also easy access to processed food and lack of passing on the knowledge by family members. At least, it's how it is for me.

The way I look at life is there are just as many excuses as there are options. There might be nobody that you actually know that can hold your hand during every movement. But there are resources for everything. Ask people at the farmers market how they get their jams right, the lady squeezing melons how she knows what is ripe, or stop by the library.
And if you really can't find those things you can still learn to cook. Just try something, pick a recipe and change it up. Notice how the recipe changes when you add different flavors.
If someone is having trouble making something both healthy and yummy I think they might just be using the wrong recipes.
Of course this isn't to say that ready made food can't be good too.

For the last bit of the magic of home cooking though it only refers to the freshness. If you are making cupcakes instead of salad it doesn't matter where it is made, it's going to be bad for you.

*Edit: oh also I feel like I should make it clear I am not trying to call YOU lazy or anything ^^' I am just talking from a general point of view. I sometimes forget that people tend to be talking about themselves with this sort of thing.

distantarray
10-18-2010, 03:00 PM
The way I look at life is there are just as many excuses as there are options. There might be nobody that you actually know that can hold your hand during every movement. But there are resources for everything. Ask people at the farmers market how they get their jams right, the lady squeezing melons how she knows what is ripe, or stop by the library.
And if you really can't find those things you can still learn to cook. Just try something, pick a recipe and change it up. Notice how the recipe changes when you add different flavors.
If someone is having trouble making something both healthy and yummy I think they might just be using the wrong recipes.
Of course this isn't to say that ready made food can't be good too.

For the last bit of the magic of home cooking though it only refers to the freshness. If you are making cupcakes instead of salad it doesn't matter where it is made, it's going to be bad for you.

*Edit: oh also I feel like I should make it clear I am not trying to call YOU lazy or anything ^^' I am just talking from a general point of view. I sometimes forget that people tend to be talking about themselves with this sort of thing.

also for people who grew up on processed foods are content cause they've never really had good food on a regular basis. My friend use to tell me AppleBee's had amazing food... I mean they're not bad usually but Amazing????? -_-; Although I'm probably a bit spoiled but living on processed foods all day everyday would kill my motivation of living...

genkimami
10-18-2010, 03:19 PM
I think eating healthy doesn't necessarily mean that you'll end up losing weight. Some healthy foods are high in calories, such as avocados, olive oil, eggs, rice, milk, etc. So you still have to be careful even when eating healthy if you're trying to lose weight. I think a big advantage to home cooking versus eating at the restaurant is portion control. Restaurants usually serve huge portions that could easily have as many calories as what you're supposed to eat in a whole day. A homemade pizza can have as many calories as one from the restaurant, but I usually end up eating less at home than if I go out. But that's just my opinion :)

Rjr3412
10-18-2010, 03:54 PM
All in all it's what you make it of, but chances are if you know how to cook and know how to cook healthy foods you have better and more control at what you eat at home, just don't lean towards comfort foods all the time.

This is what I agree with the most. Its all about controlling what you are making.

In a restuarant, or fast food, or a convenience store, anything pre-made is pretty much out of your control on what ingredients are included.

Being able to watch your salt intake, avoiding corn syrup/high fructose corn syrup, switching things like skim milk for whole milk or natural peanut butter for regular peanut butter can be some great little changes.

Another key point is that a lot of the people who follow the more nutritious/healty/diet patterns of eating will eat 5-6 meals a day. Being able to control your portions, cook stuff ahead of time, and having all your meals planned out can save a ton of money, plenty of time and make sure you get all your macro nutrients set.


With some of the things you asked about for substitutions such as yogurt and oatmeal there are some simple answers for those. Oats are a fantastic complex carb. They are, flat out, good for you, in moderation. What you need to be careful of is that the pre-made flavored oatmeals have a ton of sugar and are just not nearly as good for you. The same with anything low-fat. Its usually full of sugar, which is far likely to get you fat than fats.

Fats are not inherently bad for you. Low-fat foods are a bit of a joke to many people just becuase they tend to be virtually nutritionally void, empty calories, and fats are not whats bad in the first place, just too much calories are. Keeping in mind not all fats are created equally though, things like fatty fish (such as salmon) have EFA's or essential fatty acids which are quite healthy. You might also be familiar with them as omegas.


On another note, I firmly believe in learning to cook. I may not cook too often, but I certainly know how. Its easy, rewarding, and can often be fun. Between scouting and home ec classes I certainly picked up enough basics that I can cook on anything from a fire to a full kitchen. Besides, I think to truly be an adult, you ought to be able to cook for yourself, at least something that doesn't involve a microwave.

Good luck.

fechan
10-18-2010, 05:42 PM
*Edit: oh also I feel like I should make it clear I am not trying to call YOU lazy or anything ^^' I am just talking from a general point of view. I sometimes forget that people tend to be talking about themselves with this sort of thing.
No offence taken! I was just saying from my experience it seems to me that people are not necessary lazy, sometimes people are just raised on a certain type of cooking and don't realize there are other possibilities. A little bit as distantray is saying:
also for people who grew up on processed foods are content cause they've never really had good food on a regular basis. My friend use to tell me AppleBee's had amazing food... I mean they're not bad usually but Amazing????? -_-; Although I'm probably a bit spoiled but living on processed foods all day everyday would kill my motivation of living...


I think eating healthy doesn't necessarily mean that you'll end up losing weight. Some healthy foods are high in calories, such as avocados, olive oil, eggs, rice, milk, etc. So you still have to be careful even when eating healthy if you're trying to lose weight. I think a big advantage to home cooking versus eating at the restaurant is portion control. Restaurants usually serve huge portions that could easily have as many calories as what you're supposed to eat in a whole day. A homemade pizza can have as many calories as one from the restaurant, but I usually end up eating less at home than if I go out. But that's just my opinion :)
Heeeey, fancy seein' you here. ;)
I agree with you. I think the 'power' of homemade cooking is usually presented in a misleading way. I think it's hard to know decide what stays ad what goes into recipes. Portion are definitely something easy to control. I try to use small plates so that my plates always look full. (It's kind of sad to see a portion the size of your hand all alone in the middle of a gigantic dinner plate.)


Being able to watch your salt intake, avoiding corn syrup/high fructose corn syrup, switching things like skim milk for whole milk or natural peanut butter for regular peanut butter can be some great little changes.

Another key point is that a lot of the people who follow the more nutritious/healty/diet patterns of eating will eat 5-6 meals a day. Being able to control your portions, cook stuff ahead of time, and having all your meals planned out can save a ton of money, plenty of time and make sure you get all your macro nutrients set.


With some of the things you asked about for substitutions such as yogurt and oatmeal there are some simple answers for those. Oats are a fantastic complex carb. They are, flat out, good for you, in moderation. What you need to be careful of is that the pre-made flavored oatmeals have a ton of sugar and are just not nearly as good for you. The same with anything low-fat. Its usually full of sugar, which is far likely to get you fat than fats.

Fats are not inherently bad for you. Low-fat foods are a bit of a joke to many people just becuase they tend to be virtually nutritionally void, empty calories, and fats are not whats bad in the first place, just too much calories are. Keeping in mind not all fats are created equally though, things like fatty fish (such as salmon) have EFA's or essential fatty acids which are quite healthy. You might also be familiar with them as omegas.


On another note, I firmly believe in learning to cook. I may not cook too often, but I certainly know how. Its easy, rewarding, and can often be fun. Between scouting and home ec classes I certainly picked up enough basics that I can cook on anything from a fire to a full kitchen. Besides, I think to truly be an adult, you ought to be able to cook for yourself, at least something that doesn't involve a microwave.

Good luck.
Thanks for the input. There are so many things you can control when making the food yourself that it's easy to feel overwhelmed with all the ingredient substitutes and cutting down fat/sugar/salt possibilities.
I agree that learning to cook is a must for everyone. Even if it's rarely used or if meals are mostly pre-made/frozen stuff it helps understanding what you are eating to know how to make it.

aaachiaki
10-18-2010, 06:45 PM
In a general agreeance with everything that's been said here... Homemade food is not inherently "powerful" but the fact that you can see what's going into it, and have control over it is a big deal. For example when I started cooking i never realized what went into making a good crust for like a potpie. When you're cutting in a Cup of Crisco into the dough it makes you think twice even when you're eating out, no matter how good it is.

One thing I found interesting that you said fechan was...

"At the risk of sounding like an old lady, I think that new generations have less cooking knowledge than they used to. Personally, I was never taught how to cook and what I know now was through many years of hard work starting from nothing."

At the risk of sounding kind of pompous I feel like if you really want to learn something you will. Nothing prevents people from walking into their kitchen and cooking. Maybe younger kids who have no control over what their mom's buy in the grocery store and their parents for whatever reason refuse to let their children cook. (Which, my mom was ecstatic about personally when I was younger even if I agreed to make spaghetti noodles...)

Either way, we're in the generation of endless knowledge, all the time, at our fingertips. There's little excuse for "I don't know how" or "I wasn't taught." If you really want to learn you google whatever you want to cook, and you get 20 recipes, 10 with photos, and 3 with videos. Sure you'll likely mess up if you're a newbie, but like anything it's just practice.

In any case, I get what you're saying and agree. Home-cooking is sometimes over-fluffed. But what else is new in the diet world? They have pills that promise to cut your fat without you having to change your diet or exercise and people still think those are effective. There are 100 calorie brownie snacks and things like that, people eat 20, and wonder why they're not loosing weight because they're eating the "healthy" desert. Home-cooking is another option, like any other option for eating healthy and weight loss. But like many other things for weight loss people miss-understand the use of a tool. Many find it easier to control the things themselves and don't feel the pressure of portion or content if they're making it themselves.

But that's just my two cents.

fechan
10-18-2010, 07:37 PM
In a general agreeance with everything that's been said here... Homemade food is not inherently "powerful" but the fact that you can see what's going into it, and have control over it is a big deal. For example when I started cooking i never realized what went into making a good crust for like a potpie. When you're cutting in a Cup of Crisco into the dough it makes you think twice even when you're eating out, no matter how good it is.

One thing I found interesting that you said fechan was...

At the risk of sounding kind of pompous I feel like if you really want to learn something you will. Nothing prevents people from walking into their kitchen and cooking. Maybe younger kids who have no control over what their mom's buy in the grocery store and their parents for whatever reason refuse to let their children cook. (Which, my mom was ecstatic about personally when I was younger even if I agreed to make spaghetti noodles...)

Either way, we're in the generation of endless knowledge, all the time, at our fingertips. There's little excuse for "I don't know how" or "I wasn't taught." If you really want to learn you google whatever you want to cook, and you get 20 recipes, 10 with photos, and 3 with videos. Sure you'll likely mess up if you're a newbie, but like anything it's just practice.

In any case, I get what you're saying and agree. Home-cooking is sometimes over-fluffed. But what else is new in the diet world? They have pills that promise to cut your fat without you having to change your diet or exercise and people still think those are effective. There are 100 calorie brownie snacks and things like that, people eat 20, and wonder why they're not loosing weight because they're eating the "healthy" desert. Home-cooking is another option, like any other option for eating healthy and weight loss. But like many other things for weight loss people miss-understand the use of a tool. Many find it easier to control the things themselves and don't feel the pressure of portion or content if they're making it themselves.

But that's just my two cents.

You bring an interesting point. I agree that people who want to learn will and I'm the proof of that as I mentioned in another reply.




I was just browsing through the other threads on the fitness forums and clicked on a link, then another from that site and ended up on this page: http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-calculator.asp
It can't be perfect but it's a great way to know what is better between two similar recipe!! I'm currently inputting all my recipes from my recipe journal and writing down estimated nutritional information beside them. :D

Rjr3412
10-19-2010, 08:12 AM
But what else is new in the diet world? They have pills that promise to cut your fat without you having to change your diet or exercise and people still think those are effective.

I'd actually be interested in finding something that actually claimed this, lol. All of them, and I mean every last one that I've ever seen or heard of, say only in conjunction with proper diet and exercise. At that point most people will think, well then whats the point?

If you can't control your eating, and get yourself moving, it doesn't matter what "supplements" you take, because you ain't supplementing anything.

fechan
10-19-2010, 08:18 AM
I'd actually be interested in finding something that actually claimed this, lol. All of them, and I mean every last one that I've ever seen or heard of, say only in conjunction with proper diet and exercise.
I know a lot of diet tea (laxative tea) and diet pills at the Asian market and pharmacy near where I live don't outright say you have to exercise in conjunction with taking their product.

Excerpt from a weight loss pill website (I just googled it):
"Sherry Hubbard Loses 16 Pounds and 2 Inches In 4 Weeks WITHOUT EXERCISE!

I just wanted to let you know that after following the diet for one month with no exercise, I have lost 16 pounds and two inches. I will keep you updated of my progress."

Maybe the bottle of pill doesn't say NOT TO exercise but their website leads you to believe you can loose weight with their magic pill without exercising...

distantarray
10-19-2010, 07:03 PM
I know a lot of diet tea (laxative tea) and diet pills at the Asian market and pharmacy near where I live don't outright say you have to exercise in conjunction with taking their product.

Excerpt from a weight loss pill website (I just googled it):
"Sherry Hubbard Loses 16 Pounds and 2 Inches In 4 Weeks WITHOUT EXERCISE!

I just wanted to let you know that after following the diet for one month with no exercise, I have lost 16 pounds and two inches. I will keep you updated of my progress."

Maybe the bottle of pill doesn't say NOT TO exercise but their website leads you to believe you can loose weight with their magic pill without exercising...

without exercise yes but it says DIET which I'm pretty sure they made them eat less or different foods and portions :)

sennintoad
10-22-2010, 05:28 AM
In response to the thread, I have one statement.

----RANT START-------------


If you're eating snacks then you aren't going to lose weight.

For years, I ate home made food from my mother, but I always took a candy bar or something to school to have as a mid afternoon snack. Now, believe me when I say this, those snacks add up quickly on one another ina week and can end up being a huge amount of calories

A dairy milk bar is about ten percent of your days caloric intake, thats a lot for a 25 gram or so bar.

I found the best way to lose weight is the following

do not salt your food, avoid sauces, relishes and extras whenever possible

do no eat high sugar foods.

Water first thing in the morning is a metabolic kickstarter. Drinking water is not only recommended for a few litres a day (I hear differing numbers between 2-3 minimum) But also functions as a hunger represant. A lot of the time, out body makes us feel hungry because it craves fluid, sounds strange but most creatures cannot find clean water at as easy a way as we can now thanks to our taps and ready to drink bottles, we used to get most of our water from eating. If you feel hungry, a glass of water is best. If you still feel hungry after 20 minutes, then you actually need the food. Try this, it worked well with a lot of people I know who tried it.


Snacks are a bad idea to lose weight. Humans are not cows, we need not graze. If you keep eating all day long, no matter how healthy it is, it won't do you any good in managing your weight, and then there are adverse effects like indigestion and stomach problems. Little and often is ok. I eat sometimes 6, very small meals a day.


I always avoid sauces on salads and meat when I can (though I will have a small amoung of ketchup on my montly bacon butty) Also, try to avoid buttering bread, worked well for me! Salts, artificial sugars and coffee are to be avoided if you want to maximise weight loss.


Sleep is vital to weight loss, because lack of sleep slows the metabolism. And if you understand how vital the metabolism is to everything in the body, then keeping it at its best is a no brainer. To help with sleep, avoid carbs in the evening meal. The body is working harder to burn potatoes and rice than say, protein like meat. It takes 1 hour to burn a small steak, it can take 4-6 for carbs (dependant on glicemic levels) if you eat dinner at 7, your body wont be ready to sleep till about 1 in the morning, which, while it might not sound so bad if you can get a lie in, doesnt help. When the body is asleep before midnight, it shuts down a lot better thanks to the internal body clock. Sleeping after the body clock passes what it knows is midnight means it wont relax fully due to subconsciously knowing the Sun is on its way, and this will effect sleep quality. A deeper sleep can be done by going to bed early and or powernapping (remember though, late afternoon power naps can throw off sleep patterns so be careful not to leave your napping too late, if you choose to do so)

If stressed, on drugs, caffiene or alcohol, weight loss is also a problem.

------RANT OVER-------------------

Ok so Im going to summarize this: What you make does not matter if it is home made or not, there a LOT more factors to controlling weight than just being supermarket salmon or caught yourself. Its what you do to the food, your body and your health that really matters.

If your homemade food is really as unhealthy as you mentioned, go to a different recipe site. It is within your ability to judge what to put in and on your foods, what to eat, and how often to eat, what exercise you must do and what will keep you healthiest. Diet is only about 20 percent the problem

Rjr3412
10-22-2010, 09:23 AM
Sennin sorry to burst your bubble but some of the things you said are just flat out wrong:
- While water is good, 1 or 2 liters is not enough for an active person, more like a gallon +

- Snacks are very useful, you yourself said you eat 6 very small meals a day. Those are "snack" size. Probably about 300-500 calories each. Keeping good snacks, healthy and high protein items will keep you fuller and far less likely to binge when you do eat.

- Sauces can be bad, but only when they are chock full of calories made up from sugar and fats. There are healthier options out there such as mustard and hot sauce which are extremely low calorie, and can help keep you from getting bored with an unchanging diet.

- Salt is not necessarily bad for a young, healthy active individual. The only issue it can present is some water retention. For older, less healthy individuals this is a valid consideration, but this is still an important difference to note.

- Coffee & caffeine are NOT bad for you. Coffee, when unaccompanied by sugar and creamers is quite healthy. It is full of a number of anti-oxidants and caffeine itself does help boost the metabolism. The issue is abuse and overuse of caffeine will dull and remove the positive effects. At least once every other month you should take a week or two off of caffeine, in order to lower your tolerance level to the stimulation effect.

- Eating shortly before bed is a tricky topic. Eating the wrong things will most definitely lead to fat. You do not need to eat high fatty, or slow burning carbs anywhere near bed. On the other hand, slow digesting protein (like casein protein) can be an ideal item to eat an hour or so before bed, because it will mean your body has a source of protein flowing into it for the next few hours.
While you are sleeping Growth Hormone is at its peak. This nifty little hormone aids greatly in digestion and assimilation of nutrients into the body. Muscles are not "built" in the gym. They are torn down and given a reason to reform bigger and stronger. It is while you rest and sleep that the body sets to work

- Finally, diet is 80-90% of what will determine your fitness level, not 20%. That only applies to genetic marvels who can eat anything and grow in all the right ways. If you truly wish to see progress it is all about eating the right things, at the right times, and push yourself where it counts.

genkimami
10-22-2010, 09:32 AM
It is also my opinion that eating light snacks between meals is not an obstacle to losing weight. When I go to work, I always have one or two 100 calorie snacks (for example an apple, or about 10 triscuits which is 90 calories I believe) in case I get hungry before lunch or during the afternoon. Despite eating that, I can keep my calorie intake low enough and still lose weight. It also helps not being so hungry when it comes time to eat my actual meal and overeat.

HomeDepot
10-25-2010, 10:48 PM
Sennin sorry to burst your bubble but some of the things you said are just flat out wrong:
- While water is good, 1 or 2 liters is not enough for an active person, more like a gallon +

- Snacks are very useful, you yourself said you eat 6 very small meals a day. Those are "snack" size. Probably about 300-500 calories each. Keeping good snacks, healthy and high protein items will keep you fuller and far less likely to binge when you do eat.

- Sauces can be bad, but only when they are chock full of calories made up from sugar and fats. There are healthier options out there such as mustard and hot sauce which are extremely low calorie, and can help keep you from getting bored with an unchanging diet.

- Salt is not necessarily bad for a young, healthy active individual. The only issue it can present is some water retention. For older, less healthy individuals this is a valid consideration, but this is still an important difference to note.

- Coffee & caffeine are NOT bad for you. Coffee, when unaccompanied by sugar and creamers is quite healthy. It is full of a number of anti-oxidants and caffeine itself does help boost the metabolism. The issue is abuse and overuse of caffeine will dull and remove the positive effects. At least once every other month you should take a week or two off of caffeine, in order to lower your tolerance level to the stimulation effect.

- Eating shortly before bed is a tricky topic. Eating the wrong things will most definitely lead to fat. You do not need to eat high fatty, or slow burning carbs anywhere near bed. On the other hand, slow digesting protein (like casein protein) can be an ideal item to eat an hour or so before bed, because it will mean your body has a source of protein flowing into it for the next few hours.
While you are sleeping Growth Hormone is at its peak. This nifty little hormone aids greatly in digestion and assimilation of nutrients into the body. Muscles are not "built" in the gym. They are torn down and given a reason to reform bigger and stronger. It is while you rest and sleep that the body sets to work

- Finally, diet is 80-90% of what will determine your fitness level, not 20%. That only applies to genetic marvels who can eat anything and grow in all the right ways. If you truly wish to see progress it is all about eating the right things, at the right times, and push yourself where it counts.

Actually very few things concerning diet and exercise are just flat out wrong/ right. All people bodies respond differently to changes in diet and activity, and most of us on this forum are just sharing our opinions and personal findings.

With regards to home cooking, which I do believe in heartily, the key is that the cook controls the ratio of food groups present in the meal and the quantity. Fechan said that she changes recipes to make them more healthy; that is a point in favor of making your own food. In defense of butter I must say that I lived in a Coop for three years where all the cooks used gobs of butter in their cooking but we ate well balanced meals every night, and I did not gain a pound while living there. I went to China for the summer where i had no kitchen and thus ate out all the time and gained five pounds in three months eating only food cooked in oil. That is just my body though.

Also cooking really does not have to be that hard, just follow the recipes and after a while you start to get a feel for how food behaves. epicurious.com allrecipe.com and public libraries are great resources for looking up recipes that you can make from scratch.