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View Full Version : Suggestions on Constructing Chaltier


Renegade Spiral
10-29-2010, 01:43 PM
http://images4.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20070706012247/aselia/images/thumb/4/4d/Chaltier1.jpg/324px-Chaltier1.jpg

Any suggestions on what type of material to use? I'm thinking of maybe using wood, but I'm not sure, as I have no expierience with it and I want to make him look his best. My main issue in figuring out how to make him is the gaurd and how it covers the hand, any suggestions on what to use for that?

Help is greatly greatly appreciated :)

Eau de Decus
11-01-2010, 07:42 AM
http://images4.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20070706012247/aselia/images/thumb/4/4d/Chaltier1.jpg/324px-Chaltier1.jpg

Any suggestions on what type of material to use? I'm thinking of maybe using wood, but I'm not sure, as I have no expierience with it and I want to make him look his best. My main issue in figuring out how to make him is the gaurd and how it covers the hand, any suggestions on what to use for that?

Help is greatly greatly appreciated :)I don't know anything of the character other than from the picture, so if I'm wrong on the details, let me know. Honestly, if I were to make it, I would just use wood for the blade. Something lightweight, but strong enough to keep from bending. Most conventions ban live steel, cardboard can bend, and foam is too fragile and usually looks like, well, foam...so I would stick with wood. From the looks of the picture, I would do the tip of the sword, down to the handle as one piece (including the section that flares out with, what appears to be a clock face). I would do the hand guard and the curved portion as a separate piece (but one piece) and mount it afterward.

If the sword is cut from wood, you would do the fine detail work on the tip (at the bottom) with a basic dremel toolkit to get the curved tip. As far as cutting the sword from wood, I always just use a circular saw for a rough cut (but as close to the final shape as I can), then use a dremel to cut/sand down the curved portions as need be.

The flared part above the hand guard (with the clock face?) I would cut out as part of the sword and make it connected to the whole sword (assuming the clock is only on one side and not on the back too) to keep it secure. I would cut it flat, but if the gold/clock face is suppose to be 3D ( I can't tell very well from the photo), I would use basal wood dowels and cut them and make rough shapes of the gold design and glue them down. For the clock, I would find a clock face from any kind of actual clock that is the correct size, take it out of the clock and mount it to the frame. I'd cover the basal wood dowels in wood filler (Elmer's wood filler/wood putty) as with the entire sword to give it a universal surface texture. Sand it to shape, recover to cover over cracks/imperfections, sand down...rinse and repeat until as smooth as you are comfortable with. I usually do about three coats - the first somewhat thick and the others very thin to cover only the imperfections.

The guard and curved portions, I'd make out of simple cardboard, shaping it by breaking the fibers in the middle to make it bend withing creasing very much. Hot glue the pieces together and once the basic shape is formed, attach it to the sword. Once it's on the sword, I would do a base wood filler coat to smooth it out (so it doesn't look like cardboard) and to give it added strength. Once that is done, I would use basal dowels to add the silver designs on the top, cover those in wood filler and sand down (using as many coats as need be to give it a smooth finish).

Paint it silver, then cover the handle in a clear coat or paint sealer to keep it from coming off on your hands from the oil/sweat on your hands. I know it is a little difficult to visualize without photos step-by-step, but it's an easy and cheap method to making most sword props and they are nearly indestructible. If anything chips, all you do is apply wood filler, sand, repaint and you're done. Unless it snaps in half, it should last for years and years. =)