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View Full Version : Trying to eat more, but schedule sucks


PolishPu
11-03-2010, 09:48 PM
I know you are supposed to eat at least 5 small meals a day, and I'm trying to do this, but jeez.

I wake up at noon, (this needs to be fixed) unless it's a school day, then it's 8:00 a.m. These days I am able to make breakfast at least, but it's usually after class. I work a 2 P.M. to 11 P.M. schedule, and I know you are not supposed to eat after 10 (or is it 8?) and I am not allowed to eat at my cubicle at work either so, how can I get my meals/snacks in correctly? My lunch is at 6 P.M. I'm finding it hard to squeeze in my food in these times, and snack machines have very little healthy food in them. Then there are days when our team gets rewarded with cake, Pizza and Nachoes. It's all so tempting but I must resisit, but end up going hungry which is bad. I already look like a fool jogging in place and doing push-ups at my desk.

Any of you have issues like this as well? How do you fix em? You ever feel like the world is agaisnt you and TRYING to prevent you from losing weight?

Edit: Water intake
How much is drowning? 64 oz is what you should have a day, but I've read some people make to 120 oz. I actually made it to 90 something one day but it made me feel...watery? (I could feel water behind my eyes and when I breathe, ugh. ) When is it enough or is this normal?

Rjr3412
11-04-2010, 08:51 AM
I know you are supposed to eat at least 5 small meals a day, and I'm trying to do this, but jeez.

I wake up at noon, (this needs to be fixed) unless it's a school day, then it's 8:00 a.m. These days I am able to make breakfast at least, but it's usually after class. I work a 2 P.M. to 11 P.M. schedule, and I know you are not supposed to eat after 10 (or is it 8?) and I am not allowed to eat at my cubicle at work either so, how can I get my meals/snacks in correctly? My lunch is at 6 P.M. I'm finding it hard to squeeze in my food in these times, and snack machines have very little healthy food in them. Then there are days when our team gets rewarded with cake, Pizza and Nachoes. It's all so tempting but I must resisit, but end up going hungry which is bad. I already look like a fool jogging in place and doing push-ups at my desk.

Any of you have issues like this as well? How do you fix em? You ever feel like the world is agaisnt you and TRYING to prevent you from losing weight?

Edit: Water intake
How much is drowning? 64 oz is what you should have a day, but I've read some people make to 120 oz. I actually made it to 90 something one day but it made me feel...watery? (I could feel water behind my eyes and when I breathe, ugh. ) When is it enough or is this normal?


Eating multiple meals per day, while conventional wisdom, doesn't necessarily work for everyone. Quite frankly eating multiple small meals a day is not necessary to be successful in getting in better shape. While many find success utilizing it, there isn't actually any proof or studies backing it up.

Are you sure you aren't allowed to eat at your cubicle? If you do it anyway is someone going to say something?

The most important first step you can take is getting your calories where you want them each day. After that, making sure that you are splitting up your macros well, getting enough protein and fats and the balance with carbs. From there you can clean up to healthier foods.

Do you do any actual exercise routines? Like 20+ minutes? Trying to get a nice protein rich meal after this is typically considered the most useful. But it is not an excuse to overindulge.

As far as water intake I currently use a 24oz water bottle. It gets filled about 5-7 times each day I think. Though I have found I'm much better about drinking enough water during week days while at work as opposed to the weekends when that gets cut about in half.

Something useful to try for getting out of those "reward" meals: If you know they are coming eat your meal shortly before. You'll be full, not hungry, and have an excuse that you just ate, win win.

Na'vi wannabe
11-04-2010, 09:48 AM
Make your meals the previous day weighing out the ingredients on an electric kitchen scale as appropriate to your aims. Put them in plastic boxes. When you know you're not going to be able to sit down and eat a particular meal, have a liquid meal instead- some suggested ingredients: oats (complex carbs), whey & milk protein blend (fast and slow protein), peanut butter (good source of fat).

32spartan11
11-04-2010, 11:37 AM
Eating multiple meals per day, while conventional wisdom, doesn't necessarily work for everyone. Quite frankly eating multiple small meals a day is not necessary to be successful in getting in better shape. While many find success utilizing it, there isn't actually any proof or studies backing it up.

There have been studies to prove this One included two boxers trying to cut weight. they both intook the same amount of calories and did the same amount of exercise. while one ate twice a day and the other 5-6. The boxer who spread out his calories lost significantly more weight.

I can't remember the exact study, I saw it a while back probably 2+ years ago but I found it on men's health.

@Polishpu get a lunch box and pre-prepare the meals. Then you dont have to worry about spending extra time figureing out what you want to eat and getting it. Na'Vi said it best you could make protien shakes/smoothies some of the best in are blue berries, bananas, raspberries, and the other ingredients Na'Vi said. Those fruits not only make it taste good but have some of the best nutrients you can get.

For my self I try to eat every two hrs no matter what. Sometimes I push it later but eating on a set schedule like that helps what seems to be a daunting task get done.

Rjr3412
11-04-2010, 01:25 PM
Hmm, Spartan I'd love to read the study if you can find it, though if it came out of Men's Health that might leave it a littttttttle questionable. And theres the fact that a sample size of 2 is not really statisically relevant.

What I would be curious about though is whether there macros were the same and the timing of meals around their workouts. And for the weight lost, while I realize weigh ins are what counts with boxers, I personally think the amount of fat lost is more important, or change in BF%.

There have been studies around trained athletes eating only once a day, or just late at night (Soccer players and Ramadan) which have been shown to not only allow greater flexibility in diet (ie carbs) but actually showed body composition improvements. You can read about it on leangains.com if curious.

I though have tried the six meals a day, and while seeing some progress its a huge pain to go to that much trouble. And while sticking to a smaller number of meals, but still maintaining the appropriate macros and calories have seen similar progress without the nuisance and prep work.

32spartan11
11-04-2010, 10:52 PM
I understand completely where your comin from! People most of the time state things without a source and it's like ok, so? I'll try to find it if they even have it posted, it was an acedemic study from over seas (im in the states), if I remember correctly. Since I started using men's health about 2 years ago for the most part they do site university studies and thats the stuff I use.

but then again even acedemic studies have been biased dunno if you heard about all those discarded emails found in the UK from the main scientific journal doing research on global warming but they were publishing only articles to forward the belief in global warming because the head honchos were all getting big bucks being advisors to companies and countries about global warming. Not saying it isnt true, but really makes me wonder. but thats a toootally different topic.

kiratsukai
11-05-2010, 05:30 AM
The problem with diet plans is that there really is no "trick" that works for everyone and the hassle/tedium of the "diet" itself often becomes your undoing.

If you can't easily keep up your regimen with your schedule: it isn't a good regimen for you.

There is some evidence that smaller meals every day might have a benefit in weight loss but it isn't exactly conclusive or the only way to approach slimming down. The only 100% true nitty gritty fact of weight loss is this: you need to burn more calories than you use.

That could mean eating less more often.
That could mean skipping a meal and sticking to your guns.
That could mean eating nothing but protein a la atkins.
That could mean a liquid diet or prepackaged meals.
That could mean eating nothing but celery, cookie crumbs and lemon water every meal ("detox" diets, severe calorie restriction)
It could mean excersizing a little... or a lot more.

Obviously not all of these methods are safe or even sensible. But they all have studies and (sometimes dubious) science backing them up to "prove" that they work.

But saying something works in a study or on paper doesn't mean it's something you ought to be doing... or even that it's something that will work for you.

Ideally your own plan will be a combination of what works for you and doesn't compromise your health. All of the "trick" diets have their drawbacks... be it in hassle, cost or the toll on your health. It's easiest not to "diet" at all and simply remove one or two high calorie, health-damaging items from your habitual lifestyle whenever you think you can: ex. kicking soda and carbonated drinks, having desert only on weekends, fast food only once a month... or not at all.

Small changes are easier to abide by than larger ones... and once you've kept them up long enough, you hardly notice yourself missing "the way you were".

I haven't had a soda in 3 years. I don't miss it.

If you're dead set on the "more meals" route, then start carrying small, healthy snacks with you to eat in the break room at work or in the car during your commute. "Grazing" doesn't need to be a sit down and eat something prepared deal. It can be snacking, too.

Just be sure your small meals fit the calorie restrictions you need to keep to reach your goal.