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View Full Version : What's a good first time Costume?


Ayane
10-18-2002, 03:03 PM
?

Tenjou
10-18-2002, 03:15 PM
Something simple that you'll have a fun time making. Oh, and it's cool when it's your favorite character or you like him/her. ^_^

JoeBoeing
10-18-2002, 03:20 PM
I agree with Tenjou... if you don't know how to sew take a couple classes at a fabric store or colllege.

As for easy costumes... look for something that can be store bought and/or easily modified.

And since your Ayane... how about Ayane's fighting clothes from the Anime, Ayane's High Kick.

That can be put together quickly. I don't have any refrence pics but if you are interested I might be able to find some for you.

FRom,
Joe Boeing

P.S.
Thrift shops are your friend

Chosuke
10-18-2002, 03:31 PM
Thrift shops are definitely your friend.

But just a tip if you do actually sew it,PLEASE do not use satin unless you know you are fully capable.Alot of first costumes are made with this cause its shiny.. but it is definitely not a beginner fabric.

P.S cotton is also your friend,so is an iron.

Ayane
10-18-2002, 03:35 PM
What is a good shiny beginner fabric??

Ayane
10-18-2002, 03:41 PM
What's harder to sew silk or satin??

Chosuke
10-18-2002, 03:49 PM
I absolutely DO NOT suggest either of those for a beginner ^^;

they are both fairly tricky ..

Ayane
10-18-2002, 03:51 PM
A Velvet fabric??

Chosuke
10-18-2002, 03:53 PM
x.x;;..well,it all depends on what costume you pick..velvet is shiny and soft..

but not for beginners

Ayane
10-18-2002, 03:56 PM
What's a good fabric other then cotton for a beginner??

Chosuke
10-18-2002, 03:58 PM
Hmm.. well there are MANY different kinds of cotton.. blends etc.
I don't really know other names off by heart but your looking for something that isn't really too stretchy or doesnt buckle and show mistakes easy <like satin>.

I personally think cotton looks best for alot of costumes,really bright matte colors ^^

Ayane
10-18-2002, 04:01 PM
I'm looking for a fabric that shiny and good for a beginner!!

Chosuke
10-18-2002, 04:04 PM
Well why don't you research for easy shiny material then,cause I don't know any -.-
Mosty shiny material is hard to work with for a BEGINNER. Plus,do you know what costume your doing first of all?

Makoto
10-18-2002, 04:53 PM
Ayane: Go to your local fabric store. Wander. Feel things. Look at how much the fabric is fraying on the bolt; if it's a whole lot, chances are it will be difficult to work with.

Satin is very tricky to work with, and ironing it is no fun either. However, it is cheap, and if you're looking to do a ballgown or something in a more Chinese style, it's an inexpensive way to go. I find the polyester satin easier to handle than the acetate, thanks to it being somewhat thicker and less prone to wrinkling while it's on your body, much less in your suitcase.

Silk is super-expensive. If you can afford it, I want your job. ^_^ I've never worked with it myself, except cutting it at my store. I think the stress of handling such a delicate, expensive fabric would break me. XD

Taffeta would be an option, though it still frays. A bottle of Fray-Check is a good investment.

I like poplins, gabardines, georgette, and just about anything with 2-8% spandex worked in (Spring Suiting! Best fabric ever!-). They're easier to work with and have enough body so you don't get a sad, droopy costume. There are some gabardines with a lovely sheen which might be a nice alternative to shine. :)

Ayane
10-18-2002, 06:29 PM
Originally posted by Makoto
Ayane: Go to your local fabric store. Wander. Feel things. Look at how much the fabric is fraying on the bolt; if it's a whole lot, chances are it will be difficult to work with.

Satin is very tricky to work with, and ironing it is no fun either. However, it is cheap, and if you're looking to do a ballgown or something in a more Chinese style, it's an inexpensive way to go. I find the polyester satin easier to handle than the acetate, thanks to it being somewhat thicker and less prone to wrinkling while it's on your body, much less in your suitcase.

Silk is super-expensive. If you can afford it, I want your job. ^_^ I've never worked with it myself, except cutting it at my store. I think the stress of handling such a delicate, expensive fabric would break me. XD

Taffeta would be an option, though it still frays. A bottle of Fray-Check is a good investment.

I like poplins, gabardines, georgette, and just about anything with 2-8% spandex worked in (Spring Suiting! Best fabric ever!-). They're easier to work with and have enough body so you don't get a sad, droopy costume. There are some gabardines with a lovely sheen which might be a nice alternative to shine. :)

Raw Silk 45 Price Per Yard $5.15

Organza 5mm 45 Price Per Yard $5.89

Silk Twill 12mm 45 Price Per Yard $7.38

http://www.dharmatrading.com/silk_fabrics.html

Makoto
10-18-2002, 06:57 PM
I don't care for the severe slubs of Dupion and raw silk, personally, but it IS nice to see costumes with interesting textures. It keeps things unique! I didn't realize you were referring to such a variety of silk, I assumed you meant the "smooth" (and shiny) variety since it was in the same breath as "satin". ^_^

Those fabrics you referenced are fine to work with, but again, sheer fabrics are not generally recommended for beginners. French hems are ZERO FUN. They look beautiful when finished, but wow are they a lot of work. But for a few accents in your costume, they can really bring it to life.

scandia
10-18-2002, 07:10 PM
My suggestion is to find something that does not require major sewing. In other words, that the base dress/shirt/pants/skirt can be found easily at a mainstream or secondhand store, or through Ebay. Something that does not require specialized wings or odd accessories in materials that require tools to shape.

Koumori
10-18-2002, 07:27 PM
Most shiny fabrics are going to be slippery. They'll slide around under your sewing machine foot, and can be maddening for a beginner. Velvet, unless you have a serger or a similar tool for binding the seams quickly and securely, sheds like nobody's business once it's been cut, and it too is difficult to sew without specialized tools (a walking foot for your sewing machine, a needle board for pressing). The best (and actually only) way to get familiar with fabrics is to go out and look at as many as you can. If you like, get small cuts (half a yard or so), take them home and experiment with them. Just do your homework, take it slow and you'll be fine.

Mei Lan Chang
10-18-2002, 10:16 PM
This is off subject, as I have seemed to make habit of doing just so, but Makoto, the layout on your member site is so cool! Paper Wings just has this very pretty look to it.

Makoto
10-18-2002, 10:33 PM
[blush] Arigatou... like everything, it was a group effort. ^_^ I'll need to redesign soon, we have enough photos now to warrant frames... but I'll be sad to lose this one. :) thanks!

Malon
10-20-2002, 10:07 PM
wait, is there a certain way you measure for fabric? or is that the prices that I'm thinking of...

How does the measuring work?

katrinastrife
10-21-2002, 05:50 AM
wait, is there a certain way you measure for fabric? or is that the prices that I'm thinking of...

If you're using a pattern, they'll be a table with the garment and how many yards of fabric it requires. Fabric costs $X per yard, and most fabric stores will cut down to... 1/5 of a yard, at least near me.

If you made the pattern yourself, you can lay it out on a large flat surface, 40-60 inches wide (unless you know how wide the bolt of fabric you're buying is, it'd be best to measure with both.) and be sure to take care which directions the grain goes on your pattern (so the fabric will lay right.) After you lay the pieces out (newspaper with DRY ink, or tissue paper, or cheap wrapping paper, or old sheets work well for making you patterns, or mock-ups), measure how long the space is that they'll take up.

^^*

Happy sewing, Malon!
--Kat

Malon
10-21-2002, 04:38 PM
:confused: :bigcry: I liked it better when my aunt did my costumes! lol!

I think I get that... ak. now my head's spinny. Thanks for your help!

Ali-kun
10-22-2002, 12:35 AM
Dude, you're pretty adamant about getting a shiny fabric when for all I know, you don't even have a character picked out ^^;; Just a hint, I have seen a lot of costumers who used shiny fabrics, and I thought their costumes would have looked a WHOLE lot better if they weren't so blindingly shiny (plus if you get a bunch of people photographing you, the shininess reflects the flash and you can't see the costume at ALL in the photo, just this white blur ^_~)

Pick a character, look at a bunch of pictures, and if you are REALLY REALLY sure that the fabric should shine...then go for something shiny. Otherwise stay away!

And there is absolutely nothing wrong with cotton ^^;; (Ali = cotton freak, because I am so inexperienced, more exciting fabrics tend to frighten me...but I'm getting more adventurous ^_^)

katrinastrife
10-22-2002, 06:15 AM
I think matted fabrics look more like the anime does, anyway. It's easier to sew, and it looks sharper when it's all pressed and put together. At COSPA, they have the Do Re Mi witchs' costumes done in satin, and even though it's THE COSPA, they still don't look that great. X.X

Another thing I suggest for beginners--If you're doing a schoolgirl costume, go on the internet, and BUY the skirt, if it's your first time sewing. X.X Pleated skirts are EVIL! ^^*

Ganbatte!

Galaxia
10-22-2002, 11:44 PM
My first costume was Ed from "Cowboy Bebop", so I needed a pair of black spandex shorts from Foot Locker, men's undershirts from Macy*s (they're good because they're oversized...and really really soft. And they come in packages of 3, so if you mess up on one or need more than one top, you can make it), goggles from ebay, and a wig from the oriental trading company. Pretty basic stuff.

K-chan
10-23-2002, 07:42 PM
I'm looking for a fabric that shiny and good for a beginner!!

Shiny...you could always use Taffeta. It's dry clean only though, but it was inexpensive for me when I made my Amelia costume (that's what my cape is made of) if it gets wrinkled, like my cape did since it was too long, you'll have to get it dry-pressed or something like that. ^^;; Anyways, that was my first costume and my aunt did practically all of the sewing (I did one of the bracelets, which broke anyways....) because she has the mad skills with the sewing machine. :thumbsup: