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Flora88
01-28-2011, 09:47 AM
Okay, since there's no board on which to talk about books, I figure here is as good as any.
So. Best and worst books you ever read, and why. :)


Best: The Last Unicorn. I know it sounds girly, but, seriously, guys, this book is badass. It is extremely well-written. The lessons each character learns are new, poignant, and interesting. The characters are well-created, the imagery is vivid, and the plight of the King and the Red Bull is sad and horrifying and intriguing all at the same time. This is a book that treats its readers as though they are intelligent. It infers, but does not state. And the draw from many different folklores adds this sort of patchwork quality that's just beautiful.

Favorite part: ...all of it.

Worst: Eragon. Hands down. It's A New Hope with dragons. Seriously, I didn't find a single original idea in that entire book. He doesn't even change the name of the Empire. It's still the Empire. The names were stolen from Tolkien. The dragonriders were stolen from Anne McCaffrey. And Eragon was probably the least likable main character I've read...ever.
And before anyone goes there, no, it's not "good for a fifteen year old." I've read far better novels by fifteen-year-olds. One's writing is supposed to grow and mature as he grows and matures. And one is always supposed to revise during that growth. There was neither maturity nor growth in this entire book. I didn't dare read the other two.
Furthermore, the "I'm God's gift to fantasy" attitude that Paolini had did not help his case. Especially after he bashed Tolkien, the father of the fantasy genre.

Favorite parts: "The egg was smooth and frictionless." (No, it wasn't. If it was frictionless, it would have slipped out of his hand and slid around the world forever.)
"The sun was a glorious conflagration of pink and yellow." (No, it wasn't. A conflagration is a huge, destructive fire. He's talking about the beauty of the sun. Conflagration doesn't work here.)



What about you guys?

Aqua.Kaire
01-28-2011, 10:22 AM
Oh I wanna play!!

The WORST book I have ever read would have to be the Twilight series. Bella gets everything she wants, and she doesn't have to loose anything to get it!! Also she is a whiney brat... Edward is an emotionless pedophile that also gets whatever he wants with no effort or struggle. Jacob is a creep. He "fell in love"with a NEWBORN!! A freaking baby!! That author has serious issues... Not to mention all those stupid fangirls ,who've never read a real book, that think Twilight is the greatest thing ever created :miffed:

Favorite part: When it was finally over and I could read something good.


The BEST book is harder to pick... Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, The Hunger Games, and Maximum Ride are some of my favorites. They are all well-written with unique plots, believable characters, consequences for the character's actions, and good use of vocabulary.

I have to agree on Eragon. It only got published because of his parents, and only became big because he was fifteen. More of a case of "the dog can speak, not the dog can speak well."

penny_dreadful
01-28-2011, 10:57 AM
YAAAAY FINALLY A BOOK THREAD ALL MY DREAMS ARE COMING TRUE.

I don't know if I can pick a favorite book. When we got married, my husband and I named all the tables after our favorite novels; the table we sat at was Good Omens (http://www.amazon.com/Good-Omens-Accurate-Prophecies-Nutter/dp/0060853972/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1296232882&sr=8-1), because it more or less brought us together. My own favorite may be Wise Child (http://www.amazon.com/Wise-Child-Monica-Furlong/dp/0394891058/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1296232949&sr=1-1), by Monica Furlong. Almost no one has read it, but it has a tremendous amount of personal significance and I've read it at least once a year since receiving my first copy at age 11.

Favorite part: Probably when Juniper is explaining the value of work to Wise Child, how daily labors like washing and cleaning ground you, help keep you in touch with yourself and the earth. "But men never do those kinds of chores," Wise Child says. "Exactly," replies Juniper. XD

I've read my share of terrible books, too. Eragon was awful, as were the Twilight books I managed to finish. Twilight was the first book I read that made me so angry I literally punched it. I punched a book. I'd punch it again.

A friend gave me a copy of Cry Wolf (http://www.amazon.com/Cry-Wolf-Alpha-Omega-Book/dp/0441016154/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1296233230&sr=8-1) by Patricia Briggs, because sometimes when you find something really bad you feel compelled to share, and I found that especially offensive for containing werewolves and witches, which I normally enjoy reading about, and making them absolutely abhorrent. I mean, at least in Twilight, the werewolves aren't really werewolves.

Favorite part: The protagonist, Anna, speaks Latin to comfort herself. Yeah, that really happens. Right after the climax of the plot, she quips, "Crep, strep, venefica est mortua." She just said "Ding, dong, the Wicked Witch is dead"... in Latin. Bad Latin. FFFNNNNGGG.

Kildread
01-28-2011, 11:00 AM
Admittedly, I haven't read a book in *years* when I used to spend every day reading parts of one. Do I have a favorite amongst all of them? Not really, I read through a lot of books from the series of Bob Morane, Perry Rhodan, Maigret, passing by Dragonlance and Forgotten Realms. None of those disappointed me and I absolutely adore devouring each and every chapter they offered me.

I do, however, have a worst book ever : L'Arrache-coeur by Boris Vian.

The entire thing is one big wierd metaphor --- from life in the boonies being unchanging with no real way to tell the passing of time, to parents caging their childs in golden cages to protect them so they cannot 'fly freely in the sky'.

Adding to that 'geriatic auctions' where the old people are put on sale and treated like objects. To a dude swimming in the local river, picking out rotten/dead things the townfolks throw in there to wash themselves of their sins.

...honestly, it felt like a drug trip. Worst book I ever read and it really put the final nail in my belief that each and every 'required reading' in class would be bad.

J.Kazama
01-28-2011, 11:09 AM
The best book I've ever read was Dante's Divine Comedy. I adore that book, I've read it lots of times, and never get tired of it. My other favorite is Lord of the Rings.

The worst book....honestly and I hope you don't throw me stones, is Harry Potter. I tried reading the first one. Honestly tried. But never even finished it. Bored me so bad! That and Twilight. I read all the books to see what was the fuzz about, but....nah, not that good either.

Kildread
01-28-2011, 11:13 AM
On twilight (http://theoatmeal.com/story/twilight).

HidingintheMist
01-28-2011, 11:13 AM
Best?-
I'd have to say that at the moment, my favorite book is rather difficult to pick. Can I say a series?

If I can, I'd have to say the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan is the best so far in my personal opinion. I'm only halfway through the fifth book and so far it has yet to bore me. Normally I'm a 'speed demon' with books and finish them far too quickly, but with each of these books, I've been able to read more slowly, absorbing in every little detail. I'm rather fond of some of the characters. Like the Far Dareis Mai(Aiel Maidens of the Spear). They keep Rand in line as much as they can.

Favorite quote so far: "The Maidens cluster about him as though they owe more to him than their own clans...For the first time ever, they have allowed a man beneath a Roof of the Maidens." -book five, The Fires of Heaven

I also am rather fond of the Vampire Hunter D series...


Worst book-
Oh gosh. So many I don't like. The Twilight Saga is on the top of that list though. I despised how she changed almost everything about vampires. I mean honestly.. And now having to sit through presentations when people do that for their independent book projects in class...Seriously, I'm a senior in high school and still have to sit in class and listen to girl freak out over "omg Edward!" "No Jacobs better!" =3=; Lets just say I am pleased that we're reading Dracula at the end of the year.

Eragon was foul as well. Not as bad as Twilight obviously, but still rather foul.




On twilight (http://theoatmeal.com/story/twilight).

I like this.

penny_dreadful
01-28-2011, 11:53 AM
Worst book I ever read and it really put the final nail in my belief that each and every 'required reading' in class would be bad.

Aww, I didn't think all of our required reading was bad. Not in grade school/high school, anyway. I hated some of them (Great Gatsby and Catcher In the Rye-- I know that's like sacrilege or something, but I thought everyone in them was just so unsympathetic and I hate reading about characters I can't relate to) but others were really enjoyable and engaging. I mean, I guess they're classics for a reason, right?

Sometimes they give you really arty books that are supposed to be all profound, though, and it's just agonizing to try and get through that crap.

ThakYuki
01-28-2011, 12:33 PM
Best: The best book I've ever read has got to be the Lord of the Rings (yeah, I'm a LotR fangirl). Though Tolkien goes into extensive detail about just about everything, he pretty much set the playing field for all fantasy books. Anybody ever notice that the symbol on most of his books is actually his initials?

Worst: Definitely Twilight. I read a 3 paragraph summary of the series and it was way more interesting than the actual series. When I reached the end of the last book I went "Did I seriously just finish the series? That was the worst piece of crap I've ever read and extremely boring." I was expecting at least a little excitement. And sparkly vampires? Seriously? *shoots book*

nannyogg
01-28-2011, 12:43 PM
I can't really name a worst book, because if it's really bad, I put it down and don't waste my time.

Best book, first one that comes to mind is River Town by Peter Hessler. Absolutely fascinating, and you sense the author's change and growth in the change of his style of writing and depth of observation, rather than anything that is overtly stated.

Axelai
01-28-2011, 01:08 PM
Wow, all the hate on Twilight ;A; I'm not a fan, but... TEAM CHARLIE *is shot*

Anyways. I can't contribute to this topic too much right now, as i haven't read much. But i shall try~

Best: The Year of Living Biblically by AJ Jacobs.

Best book i've ever read. Hands down. I always suggest it to people to read. Its the story about AJ Jacobs (true story, the book is pretty much his diary), who decides to follow the bible word for word for an entire year. 8 months of old testament (as he was raised jewish), and 4 months of new testament. The beauty of it... is that its not a bible bashing book. Its great for those who are religious and who aren't. Its such a controversial book, yet not at the same time. And its wonderfully written. He's so snarky sometimes, its a fun read. I finished it in two days because i just couldn't put it down.

Favorite part: Here's a few good quotes

"I am officially Jewish, but I’m Jewish in the same way the Olive Garden is an Italian restaurant. Which is to say: Not very. I attended no Hebrew school, ate no matzoh. The closest my family came to observing Judaism was that paradoxical classic of assimilation: a Star of David on top of our Christmas tree."

and then a quote that really sums up his journey:

"You can’t immerse yourself in religion for 12 months and emerge unaffected. At least I couldn’t. Put it this way: If my former self and my current self met for coffee, they’d get along okay, but they’d both probably walk out of the Starbucks shaking their heads and saying to themselves, 'That guy is kinda delusional.' "

As for worst book... i have yet to read a book fundamentally terrible. So *shrugs*

Jeyel04
01-28-2011, 01:14 PM
I haven't read alot of books. I'll just share my best.

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

Favorite part: Every journey he had with all those planets, wherein the author was describing an adult's attitude. What a person will most likely be when he grows up. Also I like the part where the little prince was caring for his rose. In the part where he told a random rose "You're lovely, but you're empty," he went on. "One couldn't die for you. Of course an ordinary passerby would think my rose looked just like you. But my rose, all on her own, is more important than you altogether, since she's the one I've watered. Since she's the one I put under glass. Since she's the one I sheltered behind a screen. Since she's the one for whom I killed the caterpillars (except for two or three for butterflies). Since's she the one I listened to when she complained, or when she boasted, or even sometimes when she said nothing at all. Since she's my rose."

penny_dreadful
01-28-2011, 01:56 PM
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

That ranks among my favorites, too; I cry every time I read it. This (http://www.angelfire.com/hi/littleprince/framechapter21.html) is my favorite chapter.

Jeyel04
01-28-2011, 02:00 PM
That ranks among my favorites, too; I cry every time I read it. This (http://www.angelfire.com/hi/littleprince/framechapter21.html) is my favorite chapter.

Ah so nice to hear from a fellow Little Prince fan. ^^ I like it when the Little Prince never lets go of a question if it is unanswered.

kiratsukai
01-28-2011, 02:18 PM
The only book I can pick up from my childhood and enjoy every bit as much as an adult remains: "The Last Unicorn" by Peter S. Beagle. Every word still strikes me as just about perfect :3

I can't name a "worst book". All books are worthwhile provided the right person finds them *shrug*

Brsis
01-28-2011, 02:43 PM
[COLOR="RoyalBlue"]
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.


My mum used to read that to me every night in French for months when I was about six and kept getting too sick to sleep. It took me years to figure out what the hell the book was because every time I went into a bookshop and said "There's this book, and it's about a boy who draws a python with an elephant inside it but it looks like a hat..." and they stared at me like I was crazy :bigcry:

I'm very good at enjoying things for what they offer and nothing more (Or else at lowering my expectations. I'm not actually sure) and while I've read some pretty uninspiring books (The Wind Singer had some really interesting imagery but made no sense to me, The Little White Horse would have been chucked out the window if I hadn't been eleven and DESPERATE TO SEE A UNICORN, Robert Rankin's books all strung me along and then failed miserably, I didn't like The Time Traveller's Wife at all, Girl With The Dragon Tattoo left me deeply confused and bored) I don't think I really could call any the WORST.

So many best books. I am drowning in books. If I had to have a desert island five, I would probably take... Mortal Engines, Gormenghast (The trilogy is in one volume that makes it one book), Remains of the Day, The Picture Of Dorian Gray, and... er, damn, one of the Jane Austens, or maybe Neverwhere. Or maybe Out Of The Silent Planet. Or maybe Hyperion. Or- damn!

penny_dreadful
01-28-2011, 02:49 PM
Girl With The Dragon Tattoo left me deeply confused and bored

First third of that book was SO. BORING. I didn't completely hate it, but I didn't get what the big deal was. Salander was an interesting character, but the second novel sort of knocked a bit of the venom out of her, and I haven't bothered to read the third. I filed that series under "massively overrated."

Hyperion.

<3 <3 <3 <3

Dan Simmons kind of pisses me off as a person, but DAMN I love that book. And The Terror. OH YES TERRIFYING DEMONIC POLAR BEAR.

Seeteke
01-28-2011, 03:07 PM
Best: Lord of the rings, the first book.
Worst: The Cave, José Saramago.

I'm really sorry, teacher, I like reading and I love books with allegories, but I'd appreciate it if there was proper punctuation, and a possibility not to break my brain trying to figure out who's talking. If there's even talking going on. Now I don't trust you to assign the next book, because of this one. It better be worth your praise this time.

sam vimes
01-28-2011, 04:16 PM
Best: The Brothers Karamazov, Dostoevsky. Best murder mystery I've ever read.

Favorite part: Ivan explaining his poem "The Grand Inquisitor."

Worst: Anything by James Patterson.

Favorite part: None of it. Fuck you, James Patterson.

Worst: A Million Little Pieces, James Something-with-an-F. The whole thing was less about how the author struggled and emerged from rehab as a better person, and more about the author just stroking his ego's cock and telling the reader how much of a badass he is. It reads like a laundry list of reasons that explain why it's so awesomely awesome to be James Something-with-an-F.

Favorite part: He became a substitute son for a fellow rehabilitatee, who just happened to be a high-ranking figure in the Vegas underworld. Sure you did, James. Sure you did.

Worst: Atlas Shrugged. Can't believe I read the whole thing. It has no redeeming value whatsoever.

Favorite part: Selfishness is the peak of human morality and altruism is the greatest evil in the world. Congratulations: I just spared you about 1,100 pages of your time.

Michi
01-28-2011, 04:33 PM
I read a ton as a kid, and have only recently started picking it up again in the last few years.

That said, I don't have a worst book yet, thankfully!

My favorite book that I've read recently was Girl with a Pearl Earring. The writing is simply lovely and I got absolutely sucked in. And then I saw the movie and I was like "this is lame." Read the book!

PinkSelphie
01-28-2011, 04:41 PM
Best: Abarat by Clive Barker. (At least, it's my favourite, so I'm assuming it's the best.) I know that he does a lot of dark stuff, but Abarat's different. I love all the art in the books and his paintings just add so much to the story. The only complaint I have about them is how long they take to come out--I read the first two when I was eleven (didn't really understand them, but I read them) and I still have another full year before the third one comes out. :,D

Worst: Tattoo by Jennifer Lynn Barnes. I hated it so much that I had to finish reading it just so I could bitch about it--everything about it (at least, to me) was just terrible. The characters were annoying, the dialogue just seemed so forced and the plot was just stupid. I mean, the plot could have been good, it sounded interesting when I read the back of the cover. I guess it could have been a good book if it didn't suck to much.

The Hag
01-28-2011, 04:44 PM
Yeah, I couldn't possibly come up with one single "best". Probably not even one single best for each genre.

Best: The Brothers Karamazov, Dostoevsky. Best murder mystery I've ever read.

:bigtu: Definitely way up there. As is 100 Years of Solitude.

Best book I've read lately is probably Unbroken (http://www.amazon.com/Unbroken-World-Survival-Resilience-Redemption/dp/0739319698). Laura Hillenbrand can flat out write. And it should be required reading for all weeaboos who think that everything Japan has ever done EVAH is OMG AWESOME!

I recently re-read Hyperion and finally got around to reading The Fall of Hyperion. Loved both. But loved The Terror even more. <3<3<3 Also Ilium (though Olympos was massively disappointing.)

I also love Abarat. I wish he'd write the third one. It's been forever.

I can't really name a worst book, because if it's really bad, I put it down and don't waste my time.

Pretty much this. Trying to think of books that really turned me off. Band of Brothers - OMG, SO anti-semitic. Outlander. XP Partly because it was recommended to me as a time travel novel. No. It was just a lame bodice ripper. Seriously - her bodice got ripped like three times.

First third of that book was SO. BORING. I didn't completely hate it, but I didn't get what the big deal was. Salander was an interesting character, but the second novel sort of knocked a bit of the venom out of her, and I haven't bothered to read the third. I filed that series under "massively overrated."

Yeah, Salander is a great character, but absolutely everything else? :snoring:

penny_dreadful
01-28-2011, 05:30 PM
Best: Abarat by Clive Barker.

There are many things I enjoy about Clive Barker's writing, but I've never been able to wholeheartedly love him. I find the majority of his protagonists unappealing, he tends to go on a bit, and his endings usually aren't too satisfactory. I typically prefer horror stories in short form, but in Barker's case I can't even reconcile myself with those. He does have a deft hand with horror and dark fantasy, though, I'll give him that.

Just to talk more about books, because I do go on, I'm currently reading China Mieville's Perdido Street Station. I was somewhere along the way with Kraken, but I kind of trailed off and forgot where I left the book. I tend to do that-- read a bit of a book, put it down, pick up another one, repeat, maybe eventually get around to finishing some of them... Anyway, Mieville's a weird writer. He's got a unique and very evocative voice, but I think his plots tend to get away from him when he gets too wrapped up in the weirdness of his own worlds. Also, I tend to have to read with a dictionary close at hand. I don't necessarily mind that, I relish learning new words, but it's a bit of a pain to have to pause every few paragraphs and find out how "eructation" or "bathetic" are actually defined.

sailortintin
01-28-2011, 05:46 PM
Best: My best is between The Last Unicorn, Artichoke's Heart, The Count of Monte Cristo, and the Bloody Jack series.

Favorite part: All of it! These books are some of the few I'd read over and over again

Worst: Twilight Series. To be honest, I just don't get the appeal. My friends are big into and told me to read the first book. I was not impressed. I trooped through all the books though thinking it was gonna get better. I was wrong, so wrong.

Favorite part: None

nannyogg
01-28-2011, 06:33 PM
Worst: A Million Little Pieces, James Something-with-an-F. The whole thing was less about how the author struggled and emerged from rehab as a better person, and more about the author just stroking his ego's cock and telling the reader how much of a badass he is. It reads like a laundry list of reasons that explain why it's so awesomely awesome to be James Something-with-an-F.

Favorite part: He became a substitute son for a fellow rehabilitatee, who just happened to be a high-ranking figure in the Vegas underworld. Sure you did, James. Sure you did.


That's exactly what that book was... he admitted at some point that it had a lot of creative embellishment and was not actually a memoir.

Flora88
01-28-2011, 06:38 PM
The only book I can pick up from my childhood and enjoy every bit as much as an adult remains: "The Last Unicorn" by Peter S. Beagle. Every word still strikes me as just about perfect :3

I can't name a "worst book". All books are worthwhile provided the right person finds them *shrug*

You? You're awesome.

Lydialulu
01-28-2011, 06:41 PM
[/QUOTE]<3 <3 <3 <3

Dan Simmons kind of pisses me off as a person, but DAMN I love that book. And The Terror. OH YES TERRIFYING DEMONIC POLAR BEAR.[/QUOTE]


oh.my.god. THIS when i saw this thread i automatically though "terror's my favorite" and some one mentioned it yay!
so yes, favorite is the Terror by Dan simmons (i have 2 copies of this book because the first one actually fell apart from how much i read it),

the worst? speak. That book make me want to bash my head into a wall. hard.

*spoiler* (highlight to read) Pshhhhh it's technically not a polar bear >:D and i nearly cried when dr.goodsir was writing his last journal entry T.T

skyler1213
01-28-2011, 06:48 PM
For me, the best book(s): The Queen's Thief series by Megan Whalen Turner and Howl's moving castle by Diana Wynn Jones. As much as I love Miyazaki and his movies, the original novel had so much more to offer.

As for the worst book(s)...If they were that bad, I don't bother to remember them...>-<

Flora88
01-28-2011, 06:51 PM
Another of my favorites: The Little Friend by Donna Tartt. It's AMAZING. The prologue was one of the most haunting things I've ever read. FABULOUSLY good.

Another favorite: Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister. Fuck yeah, Rainbow Fish!

Another worst: Child of God by Cormac McCarthy. I know, I know, everyone generally wants to go on and on about what a genius McCarthy is, but I didn't care for this book one bit. It's hailed as a literary masterpiece, but I found more universal truths that resonated within us all...in Rainbow Fish, which has, like, twenty pages.

In McCarthy's defense, though, The Road was much better.


Random book pet peeve: I hate it when people hate on children's literature. As though it's less legitmate than adult literature, when I find it incredibly important to the literary world.

But anyway. :)

Kildread
01-28-2011, 07:40 PM
Aww, I didn't think all of our required reading was bad. Not in grade school/high school, anyway.
[snip]
Sometimes they give you really arty books that are supposed to be all profound, though, and it's just agonizing to try and get through that crap.

Truth be told, I am focusing on the bad ones rather than the few, rare, enjoyable ones. I've found it really depends on the teachers.

I'll be forever grateful for one of my teachers forcing upon everyone a small compendium of novels written by Isaac Asimov. It was only bite-sized reading at best, but I had so much enjoyment from it that I ended up checking a few of his larger books as a result.

Origin
01-28-2011, 07:56 PM
Best: The Immortals Realm by Tamora Pierce. My favorite =3 It's part of the four-part Wild Magic series but its SOOOO wonderful. It's got the fantasy I love but not just repetitive dragons and wizards, she actually put some originality and heart into it and made a fantastical believable heroine.

Favorite part: ... =3 Every page.

Worst: Twilight. I'm sure it's been said a THOUSAND times, but I read it before it became a fad and HATED it. I will swear to this day that Stephanie Meyer ripped off a Dark Enchantment book called Kiss of the Vampire by J.B Calchman. It's nothing more than a garbage thousand-times redone Romeo and Juliet sort of book where she couldn't even give a grieving sad twist to the final book.

Favorite parts: None of it. Not a single word.

origamikitsune
01-28-2011, 08:06 PM
Best:

Honestly, I'm in love with Anne Bishop's The Black Jewels Trilogy.

I also greatly enjoyed The Soulless by L.G Burbank (but haven't had the time to read the others in the series).

From required reading in high school I also enjoyed Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.

And right now I'm reading (when I get a moment free from school work) The Heroin Diaries: A Year in the Life of a Shattered Rock Star. Normally I stick with fiction, but I love this book.

Worst:

The Old Man and the Sea. I read it back in high school...but I despised it greatly. I just am not a fan of Hemingway. >_>

I must also agree with the people saying A Million Little Pieces is bad. The fact that each new sentence was a new paragraph line drove me insane, and I just could not finish this horrible book.

penny_dreadful
01-28-2011, 08:42 PM
*spoiler* (highlight to read) Pshhhhh it's technically not a polar bear >:D and i nearly cried when dr.goodsir was writing his last journal entry T.T

Mmm, I do know it is not that thing which I said it was. I just like to think of it that way.

Another of my favorites: The Little Friend by Donna Tartt. It's AMAZING. The prologue was one of the most haunting things I've ever read. FABULOUSLY good.

...


Random book pet peeve: I hate it when people hate on children's literature. As though it's less legitmate than adult literature, when I find it incredibly important to the literary world.

I enjoyed The Secret History; clearly I should add The Little Friend to my list.

I definitely share your feelings on children's lit (and YA lit, too). There's a lot of crap in there, but it's no different from adult literature in that regard. Even though I was one of those kids who sort of indiscriminately read adult and children's literature back and forth, there are few things more wonderful than seeing a kid who objects to reading find that one book that really gets them going and starts them off on the path to being good consumers of literature. :bigtu:

Cransworth
01-28-2011, 10:37 PM
Best: I would say that it's a three-way tie between His Dark Materials, One Hundred Years of Solitude, and The Alchemist. From a classic literature standpoint, and from a comically amazing standpoint, I would recommend 100 Years. From an overall enjoyable story standpoint, I would recommend the His Dark Materials series. I would say that The Alchemist has the best overall theme ("To realize one's destiny is a person's only real obligation [...] And, when you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it."). But if you haven't read these three books/series - especially if you like fantasy novels - they need to be at the top of your list.


Worst: Wutherings Heights. Enough said.

ShinobiXikyu
01-28-2011, 10:45 PM
Hmm, hard decision...
Best/favourites? All things by Tolkien (The Hobbit, LotR, Simarillion, and such), annnd most of George Orwell's work. I also love World War Z by Max Brooks. Oh, and in H.S. especially; "Crabbe" by William Bell, and "Moonfleet" (Forget the authour's name). Just awesome. OH, and Ishmael. That book really WILL change your life. I literally dropped it several times whem reading it.

Worst? It goes without saying, Twilight. What a load of crap, and what a horrendous influence to give to a preteen girl. I also hate Catcher in the Rye. The guy's just a whiny prick who bitches about hating phonies. I could get the same effect by reading some emo's livejournal.

Tonyu
01-28-2011, 11:00 PM
My favorite book has to be Enders Game (forgot the authors name). I read it over one summer, during a family trip about 8 years ago. I still remember most of it which means it was engrossing enough I paid attention when I was reading it.

The worst books I have read were ones I read for high school english; Animal Farm and A Brave New World. Animal Farm because it was sad what happened to the animals and A Brave New World because it was depressing.

Archangelz
01-28-2011, 11:17 PM
Best/Favourites: TWILIGHT!!! OMG I <3 EDward (booo Jacob he's sooooo lame!). Warewolves smell like wet dog :D

Oh wait, no, I'm not a damn fool.

I can't choose just one favorite so I'll mention both Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglass Adams.

As for worst I won't even bother saying Twilight since there is something worse out there. Yes, it's WORSE, both in content and in the way it is written. I'm talking here about Witch & Wizard by James Patterson. A coworker spoke so highly of it and offered to let me borrow the book so I gave it a shot. Sadly, it was a disgusting explosion of horrible writing and worthless characters. It was flat out unreadable. I made it about 1/4 of the way through the small book before being done with it.

BlackRose72311
01-28-2011, 11:34 PM
Best Book that I can think of right not: Wake by Lisa McMann

Favorite part: I can't say or else I'll spoil it :P

Worst book: Ghost Girl. I tried reading it because I thought it would be pretty interesting, I was dead wrong. I tried to read the whole entire thing telling myself that it would get better, but each sentence that went by I just got fed up by it and went back to the library to find a better book.

Favorite part: when I decided to take the book back.

Best book: Stonewords by Pam Conrad

Favorite part: The scene were the main character saw her ghost friend making a mess of her dinner with her family and she keeps telling her to stop and her grandparents are wondering why she's acting weird. The imagery was so great in this book that even my harshest, most nit-picky, english teacher loves it, and believe me, that's saying something.

Best/Favourites: TWILIGHT!!! OMG I <3 EDward (booo Jacob he's sooooo lame!). Warewolves smell like wet dog :D

I love Twilight,TEAM EDWARD! but my love for has been dying because of Robert Pattison and Kristen Stewart, just those two.

shortsheik
01-28-2011, 11:51 PM
Best: Among the books I have loved the most are the Fellowship of the Ring, To Say Nothing of the Dog, Good Omens, and the Orphan's Tales. But I have to say that Properties of the Light by Rebecca Goldstein is one that really blew me away. It takes romance, mystery, physics, philosophy, and just a pinch of the supernatural. It is heady, and very poetical writing, which isn't everyone's cup of tea, but I adored it.

For those who like their books quirkier, I would recommend To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis.

Worst: I haven't read Twilight. I won't claim to have a 'worst' book but some of the most disappointing books I have read include the latter Harry Potter books, which are a let-down from the enjoyment brought to me by the earlier ones. Also, Catherynne M. Valente, the same author of The Orphan's Tales, which I loved, wrote The Grass-Cutting Sword which I didn't care for at all.

HidingintheMist
01-28-2011, 11:54 PM
The worst books I have read were ones I read for high school english; Animal Farm and A Brave New World. Animal Farm because it was sad what happened to the animals and A Brave New World because it was depressing.

I'm reading Brave New World at the moment actually for my Brit Lit class. I don't hate it, but so far I'm filled with a pretty big dislike for it(I mean seriously, it threw me off when they started conditioning the babies to hate and fear books and flowers by giving them a "mild" shock). Not as much as I felt for the Scarlet Letter though.

Flora88
01-28-2011, 11:56 PM
Worst book: Ghost Girl.
...I thought it would be pretty interesting, I was dead wrong.


Oho! Punny. ;)

Akemi Idane
01-29-2011, 02:07 AM
Favorite Book (Series) : Sabriel, Lirael, Abhorsen - Garth Nix.

This is...odd. Odd because I don't like other Garth Nix. I tried reading it - I really didn't like it, at all. But for some reason these books stuck with me - he was never very good at romance, so what I like about this is probably that it's so devoid of it.
There is a lot of being alone and deep-seated ritual and I swear, if I could live in any wilderness ever I would live in the Old Kingdom.
I would get my ass killed so fast. But I'd love to live there for the brief duration I'd still be alive.

Favorite Book : The Scarlet Letter - Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Yeah, I read this as required reading and liked it. Watcha gonna do now?
Admittedly, it probably has to do a lot with me being a chick. This is a very chick book. I also really, really like british lit.
And, I dunno - something about my head just loves this book to little bitty bits.
Pearllllll~ <3

Least Favorite Book : All the Pretty Horses - Cormac McCarthy.

This man's writing makes me want to kill myself.
Everyone hails him as a hero of literature as we know it, but I hate him so much it's almost unreasonable.
COMMAS, MAN. THEY WILL NOT HURT YOU. I do not want a paragraph-long sentence connected only by a string of ands. Guess what, elementary school called, they say that's a run on and you really ought to split it up to allow for, ya know, SENTENCE FLOW.
John Grady Cole, come back when you have a personality.
Rawlins, the fact that it took me about fifteen minutes to remember your name should tell you how utterly forgettable you are.
Cole's girlfriend - Yeah, don't remember your name either. Started with an A, I think.
Blevins, you, on the other hand, were kind of awesome. Keep on rockin'. Even though you're kind of dead.

BlackRose72311
01-29-2011, 02:27 AM
Oho! Punny. ;)

xD I completely missed that

Cadmium Polyphony
01-29-2011, 02:32 AM
This is an extremely difficult question for myself to answer, which is probably why I never thought about it before.

Best book...so many variables to consider when making that judgment. My favourite book would probably be Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas or Gravity's Rainbow, but they are not the best I've read. My most influential book would probably either Neuromancer, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, or Snow Crash.

But the 'best' book, would either be Fingersmith, Pride and Prejudice, or A Room with a View. Even though I didnt like any of them more than the aforementioned books in the above paragraph, I'd still say they were 'better'.

I'd actually want to put Dune on that list, but for some reason I cant. It's really good, but still.


As for the worst, I can't really say, but a definite top contender would be that shit 'book' by that Emilie Autumn cunt. The name escapes me, and that's probably for the best.

And another book which the name escapes me, by L. Ron Hubbard. It was bad. Real bad.

Axelai
01-29-2011, 04:13 AM
This is an extremely difficult question for myself to answer, which is probably why I never thought about it before.

Best book...so many variables to consider when making that judgment. My favourite book would probably be Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas or Gravity's Rainbow, but they are not the best I've read. My most influential book would probably either Neuromancer, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, or Snow Crash.

But the 'best' book, would either be Fingersmith, Pride and Prejudice, or A Room with a View. Even though I didnt like any of them more than the aforementioned books in the above paragraph, I'd still say they were 'better'.

I'd actually want to put Dune on that list, but for some reason I cant. It's really good, but still.

I prefer Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

But thats mostly because reading the book in class ate me. So i read the zombie variant instead. The teacher loved me.

Cadmium Polyphony
01-29-2011, 05:10 AM
I prefer Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

Meh.

I've always loved Austen's classic, because of the social commentary. The fact that it so belligerently, yet politely anal-raped the establishment, and by a woman no less, was just awesome. It's like the book was a deformed baby, but the baby's deformity was being born with 37 middle fingers and a shotgun.

The Hag
01-29-2011, 05:45 AM
In McCarthy's defense, though, The Road was much better.

I don't hate Cormac McCarthy, but I don't really get what the big deal is about him either.


I enjoyed The Secret History; clearly I should add The Little Friend to my list.


Definitely. I thought The Little Friend was far superior to The Secret History


Worst: Wutherings Heights. Enough said.

Yeah, I never really got the Bronte's either.


For those who like their books quirkier, I would recommend To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis.

I actually just re-read this and The Doomsday Book and Bellweather. I love Connie Willis (though her latest was a little disappointing).

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas or Gravity's Rainbow...Neuromancer, or Snow Crash.

Also all on my best list. Though I'd put Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail higher, at least in influence, as it had a lot to do with my first political opinions.

But the 'best' book, would either be Fingersmith, Pride and Prejudice, or A Room with a View.

Fingersmith? Meh, I've sort of had it with neo-Victorian lesbianism. But Austin is someone else that I re-read often. I'd probably put Emma just a tad higher than P&P though.

Oh, and I also recently finished Just Kids by Patti Smith, which I thought was great.

Cadmium Polyphony
01-29-2011, 05:55 AM
Also all on my best list. Though I'd put Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail higher, at least in influence, as it had a lot to do with my first political opinions.

See, I'd put one of the Shark Hunts on the list, but I was going by pure 'novel' works of Thompson.

Personally, I prefer reading his gonzo works than his pseudo-fiction.

And I'm not sure where Rum Diaries lies, novel, or just gonzo, but that was good too.

illusion838
01-29-2011, 10:04 AM
I still can get over The Great Gatsby, best book I've ever read.

shortsheik
01-29-2011, 10:47 AM
I also think The Great Gatsby is fabulous.

That and The Sun Also Rises are two of my favorite works to have emerged from the authors of that generation.

korokuXneo
01-29-2011, 11:00 AM
On twilight (http://theoatmeal.com/story/twilight).

This.

penny_dreadful
01-29-2011, 11:25 AM
The worst books I have read were ones I read for high school english; Animal Farm and A Brave New World. Animal Farm because it was sad what happened to the animals and A Brave New World because it was depressing.

http://images.wildammo.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/disapproving-dog-disapproves.jpg

Favorite Book (Series) : Sabriel, Lirael, Abhorsen - Garth Nix.

The Abhorsen trilogy was recommended by someone whose opinions on literature I trust, but I was still surprised by how thoroughly I loved those novels. I think Sabriel is the strongest of the three; they're all fantastic, though. That reminds me, I've had a craving to read them again. I just have to find my copies of Lirael and Abhorsen...

The Hag
01-29-2011, 11:39 AM
http://images.wildammo.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/disapproving-dog-disapproves.jpg


Which brings up a point...."Favorite" and "Best" aren't the same thing. I mentioned books I really love that I thought were really well written and had compelling stories. But some of my favorite books aren't great literature, or even the best of whatever genre. But - people like what they like, you know? On the other hand, there are plenty of books where I can see the quality but, eh, they just aren't my thing. On the gripping hand - DH Lawrence? Why in the name of all thing's holy do people still read this guy? I think he's just awful.

nyditch
01-29-2011, 11:43 AM
I'll have to finish reading through the rest of these later and probably noting a few to read, but for now I'll contribute.

Favorites: There are several I really like and it's hard to put them into order, so I'll just list.

Siddhartha - Story of a buddhist boy growing up and finding his own path. Very well-written. I read it as a required book in high school and I would read it again. It was hard to put down.

Body Rides (by Richard Laymon) - This book is a trip, and also VERY graphic. It involves a serial torturer/killer and a guy that gets caught up in it. The twist is that he gets a bracelet that, when touched to the lips, you will leave your body and can temporarily enter the body of somebody else. It has the most twisted and demented happy ending EVER.

Where the Red Fern Grows - Always holds a place in my heart. Story of a boy, his two hunting dogs, and the adventures and struggles they went through.

Freak the Mighty - Two unlikely friends meet and go on wild adventures of the mind.

Maximum Ride - I saw someone else had this. I liked the earlier books, not so much the latter.

I'm gonna exclude manga/comics, since they're not really.... these types of books, but there are several I really like (<3 Scott Pilgrim series).


And the worst:
To Kill a Mocking Bird - I had to read this book for two different English classes and I didn't find it terrible interesting. It was brutal the second time around because I knew the story and REALLY didn't want to read it.

sam vimes
01-29-2011, 11:50 AM
Maximum Ride - I saw someone else had this. I liked the earlier books, not so much the latter.

Like when she starts fucking her brother-substitute, and this is stated to be a good thing?

This is a fraction of the reason I hate James Patterson.

Apsara
01-29-2011, 12:35 PM
A friend gave me a copy of Cry Wolf (http://www.amazon.com/Cry-Wolf-Alpha-Omega-Book/dp/0441016154/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1296233230&sr=8-1) by Patricia Briggs, because sometimes when you find something really bad you feel compelled to share, and I found that especially offensive for containing werewolves and witches, which I normally enjoy reading about, and making them absolutely abhorrent. I mean, at least in Twilight, the werewolves aren't really werewolves.

Favorite part: The protagonist, Anna, speaks Latin to comfort herself. Yeah, that really happens. Right after the climax of the plot, she quips, "Crep, strep, venefica est mortua." She just said "Ding, dong, the Wicked Witch is dead"... in Latin. Bad Latin. FFFNNNNGGG.You too, huh? I used to adore Patricia Briggs novels...actually, I used to adore Anne Bishop. Something happened with Bishop that I will never, ever speak of again but Briggs has no excuse for Anna. None. Anna is the werewolf twin of WhatsherFace in Twilight. WTF.

Talk about surprises, I made the mistake of buying David Weber's latest (and as a long time fan, its "twist" is insultingly stupid) Out of the Dark (http://www.amazon.com/Out-Dark-David-Weber/dp/0765324121/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1296325837&sr=8-1) through Amazon. Now it's convinced that I adore all supernatural books. I never thought Weber would sell out like that. >_< So, he's my current worst. I kept the damned book anyway because I'm a diehard fan.

Favorite Parts: When the book describes a rather interesting character and I really, really liked him. Then revealed who it was and exactly how he saved everyone. My jaw dropped. That entire mess was one helluva a deus ex machina! I was two fingers away from throwing the book across the room. Weber went on to repeat the entire, ludicrous scenario with all the other hostage situations.

I don't have a current favorite but I do read Swordspoint by Ellen Kushner (http://www.amazon.com/Swordspoint-Ellen-Kushner/dp/0553585495/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1296325994&sr=1-1) over and over and over just because I adore the description of everything.

C. Marie
01-29-2011, 12:45 PM
Best book? Ender's Game.

Worst? Kushiel's Dart or Wuthering Heights.

calebnotcable
01-29-2011, 01:07 PM
Best: Close tie between "One Hundred Years of Solitude" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and "the Sirens of Titan" by Kurt Vonnegut.

Worst: The fan fiction "My Immortal" which is technically a book now that it's published on Lulu!

Seikari_Love
01-29-2011, 01:08 PM
Best: Looking for Alaska by john Green
worst: Of mice and men. Steinbeck. ><

rubyspitfire
01-29-2011, 01:32 PM
Favorites: There are several I really like and it's hard to put them into order, so I'll just list.

Where the Red Fern Grows - Always holds a place in my heart. Story of a boy, his two hunting dogs, and the adventures and struggles they went through.


YES



not so much that they were the worst books i've ever read, but more that they were introduced far too early and the main issues were totally not age appropriate. i think most of these should have been senior year reads

diary of anne frank - required read for 6th grade (far more appropriate for 9th grade imo)
romeo and juliet - 9th grade (although most 9th graders didn't have the vocabulary to even understand what was going on)
wuthering heights was godawful. not only did i have to read it (also in 9th grade), i had to watch the movie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wuthering_Heights_(1939_film)). yet more vocabulary my classmates didn't understand

Cransworth
01-29-2011, 02:15 PM
Best: Close tie between "One Hundred Years of Solitude" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and "the Sirens of Titan" by Kurt Vonnegut.


Never read Sirens of Titan, but Kurt Vonnegut is great. I'm really happy that there's another 100 Years fan. I think that it's one of those books that everyone just NEEDS to read before they die

calebnotcable
01-29-2011, 03:58 PM
Best: Looking for Alaska by john Green
worst: Of mice and men. Steinbeck. ><

John Green's definitely a heavy hitter for YA fiction, though I prefer "Paper Towns" myself!

Never read Sirens of Titan, but Kurt Vonnegut is great. I'm really happy that there's another 100 Years fan. I think that it's one of those books that everyone just NEEDS to read before they die

I agree with both of these statements!

penny_dreadful
01-29-2011, 08:31 PM
Worst: The fan fiction "My Immortal" which is technically a book now that it's published on Lulu!

Oh, it is? Snap, I'mma buy a copy! That is a remarkable piece of literature right there.

not so much that they were the worst books i've ever read, but more that they were introduced far too early and the main issues were totally not age appropriate. i think most of these should have been senior year reads

diary of anne frank - required read for 6th grade (far more appropriate for 9th grade imo)
romeo and juliet - 9th grade (although most 9th graders didn't have the vocabulary to even understand what was going on)
wuthering heights was godawful. not only did i have to read it (also in 9th grade), i had to watch the movie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wuthering_Heights_(1939_film)). yet more vocabulary my classmates didn't understand

Isn't part of the point of reading in class was so that the teacher can help students understand complex concepts and language and develop reading comprehension? When I was in 4th grade-- nine years old-- we read Animal Farm and The Grapes of Wrath, and we were all more or less able to digest what was going on from class discussions and homework exercises. I'm not saying it's a great idea to give Tolstoy to first graders or anything, but I don't think any of those novels you mentioned are particularly inappropriate for those age groups.

ShinobiXikyu
01-29-2011, 09:17 PM
Oh, here's another one I just couldn't get into. Not horrendously written, but it was so boring, made little sense, and kinda dragged on without anything really happening; Jonathan Livingston Seagull.
Blegh. Couldn't even finish it, I got so bored.

Axelai
01-29-2011, 09:25 PM
I also think The Great Gatsby is fabulous.

Loved that book. I had a thing for Gatsby.

touchmon
01-29-2011, 09:28 PM
Like many people here, I loved "The Last Unicorn.", as well as Tamora Pierece's works.

Hated have to be Twilight, The City of Bones(and series). I don't know why but the main character, I hated her so much for some reason. Another series I don't like is I think it's called Evermore?, it's about immortal people. Yeah. The main character is an IDIOT.

squ33k t0y
01-29-2011, 09:49 PM
I'd like to say I actually quite enjoyed Brave New World, lol.

Meh.

I've always loved Austen's classic, because of the social commentary. The fact that it so belligerently, yet politely anal-raped the establishment, and by a woman no less, was just awesome. It's like the book was a deformed baby, but the baby's deformity was being born with 37 middle fingers and a shotgun.

Oh my, I think I might love you.

sam vimes
01-29-2011, 10:15 PM
Also all on my best list. Though I'd put Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail higher, at least in influence, as it had a lot to do with my first political opinions.

Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72 and The Great Shark Hunt are both phenomenal, phenomenal books. Hunter S. Thompson is a must-read for anyone interested in the Sixties and Seventies.

Another favorite author of mine is James Ellroy. Man is the most deliberate writer I've ever encountered. I highly recommend American Tabloid and The Cold Six Thousand if your in the mood for a crime novel.

creativecrater
01-30-2011, 01:04 AM
I have a LOT of favorite books, but my most favorite is definitely Howl's Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones. It is very different from the Miyazaki movie, though the movie is a favorite of mine too. I just find the book terribly enchanting, original, and fabulous. Again though, I have FAR too many favorites.

As for worst.... i'm agreeing with a lot of what's been said about Eragon. Bleh.

Brsis
01-30-2011, 03:49 AM
diary of anne frank - required read for 6th grade (far more appropriate for 9th grade imo)
romeo and juliet - 9th grade (although most 9th graders didn't have the vocabulary to even understand what was going on)
wuthering heights was godawful. not only did i have to read it (also in 9th grade), i had to watch the movie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wuthering_Heights_(1939_film)). yet more vocabulary my classmates didn't understand

I don't know what the conversion between the British and American systems are, but I read Anne Frank when I was eleven or twelve - same age as she is in the book - which I think was perfect.

However, I read Romeo and Juliet for the first time when I was eight and while I didn't enjoy it as much as some of the actiony ones until I got older (Well, it's hard to understand falling in love until you've actually fallen in love XD), I defy anyone who says there's an age limit on Shakespeare. The younger you start reading it, the quicker you get to grips with the old language.

And I LIKE Wuthering Heights! Okay, not as much as I liked Jane Eyre, but it's really not all that bad and if people aren't understanding the vocab, that's the teacher's fault, not the books >.>

Flora88
01-30-2011, 04:06 AM
I don't know what the conversion between the British and American systems are, but I read Anne Frank when I was eleven or twelve - same age as she is in the book - which I think was perfect.
>

I've read both versions. They're identical, except for the spellings of words like "grey" ("gray") and "colour" (color.)
For the record, I, too, read it when I was around eleven and I found it very good, indeed.

But, new worst: The Lovely Bones.

Ineedaname9
01-30-2011, 04:35 AM
Best: For Love of Evil by Piers Anthony (the third to last book in the Incarnations of Immortality Series)

Why: After the other books in the series, this one tied a lot of things together. Its a book on the mind of the 'devil', I loved it. How many times do you get to go know exactly what's going on in the bad guys mind in the series???

My favorite Part: I'd say but it's a spoiler...T_T

Worst: Twilight, Book 2

Why: First book was on the fence. Second book was kinda what the??? How, why would someone look up to this whinny little ugh....I absolutely hated this book. Only reason I read it was cause my friend bribed me, with stuff from china to finish up to the third book.

Favorite: Book the end of book two. I liked the concept behind the ruling class of vampires. They were like BAMF, and were like REAL vampires.

(On Twilight, the third book is the best in my opinion, just ignore Bella for most of it. Meyers touches some interesting plots and ideas that we're probably have been a better book than Bella and whatshisname. They should have been like a side story.)

CyberxDae
01-30-2011, 05:20 AM
Best- Blood And Gold, By Anne Rice. Oh my god. Nuff said.

A few other really great books, Dry, Magical Thinking and Running with Scissors by A. Burroughs, As well as White Oleander by Janet Fitch.

Celcia
01-30-2011, 05:32 AM
Best book I've ever read was "The Last Unicorn." That book made me feel a lot of emotions, including fear. The bits about the harpy were downright terrifying.

Worst? Twilight. I tried to give that book a chance to see what all the hype was about, but I couldn't get two pages in. After reading a few paragraphs, I started to get a headache as if my brain were screaming, "ABORT!!! ABORT!!!" It was horribly written and it was painfully obvious the writer didn't have a proper grasp on the English language.

Brsis
01-30-2011, 05:48 AM
I've read both versions. They're identical, except for the spellings of words like "grey" ("gray") and "colour" (color.)


I meant the school system - 9th grade means nothing to me. I doubt it's the same as being a 9th year, because that's thirteen.

The Hag
01-30-2011, 07:52 AM
Another favorite author of mine is James Ellroy. Man is the most deliberate writer I've ever encountered. I highly recommend American Tabloid and The Cold Six Thousand if your in the mood for a crime novel.

Ellroy is brilliant but I had to give him up. He goes to very dark places where it is not healthy for me. Similarly, the first time I tried to read The Brothers K, I got through the Legend of the Grand Inquisitor and said, "You know, I'm just not at a place right now where I should be reading this stuff." I had to come back to it when things were shinier and happier.

Y'all are bringing back memories for me. It's been years since I've read Vonnegut, but I loved Sirens of Titan and Cat's Cradle. I also loved Ender's Game, though I think that I liked Speaker for the Dead even better. It's also been years since I've read The Last Unicorn and now want to go revisit that.

As far as school curricula, the gripe I had with my kids' schools wasn't so much quality or age appropriateness, but the overwhelming grimness of everything they read. The only thing they were ever required to read that wasn't dead depressing was Holes (which is a wonderful book, IMO).

Oh but that reminds me of one of the WORST books I've ever read - Friction by Emily Frank. I used to read all my kids' books (school and otherwise) and this was a summer reading assignment. It was so awful that I wrote an angry letter to the school. The adults in the book are horrifically irresponsible and then the 8th grade girl narrating the story talks about how it's her fault that she wasn't able to protect her friend from sexual abuse or protect her "wonderful" teacher (who was a complete asshole) from false accusations. I RAGED!!!!

penny_dreadful
01-30-2011, 08:50 AM
As far as school curricula, the gripe I had with my kids' schools wasn't so much quality or age appropriateness, but the overwhelming grimness of everything they read. The only thing they were ever required to read that wasn't dead depressing was Holes (which is a wonderful book, IMO).

It does seem like a lot of assigned reading utilizes a theme of Depressing as Schnit. There tends to be a bias among overblown literary types that if it's upbeat, humorous, and has a happy ending, it's not "real literature." It's not much of a surprise that so many young people get turned off of reading when the bulk of their assigned material makes them feel like crap about life.

Lithium Flower
01-30-2011, 09:53 AM
"The egg was smooth and frictionless." (No, it wasn't. If it was frictionless, it would have slipped out of his hand and slid around the world forever.)

Somehow this amuses me greatly.

I have a lot of favorites, but I'll try to fangirl over only one today.

Let The Right One In (Lat Den Ratte Komma In) by John Ajvide Lindqvist

Why: For anyone who has ever felt abused, unwanted and utterly alone there is a feeling of love that comes from it. Because I remember vividly as a child, being completely alone.There are bad places that do not go away, that you remember forever...When a bully grabbed me by the back of the head and dragged me to the river, shoving my head down in the water while his friends stood there doing nothing. I remember tasting the salty sand and mud going down my throat and struggling until some other kid pulled him away and I vomited up sand and lake water on the shore. And for me, there is an overwhelming sense of connection to a story that revolves heavily around children coming of age and terrible dark places.

Favorite part: This is a tough one and it's hard to pick one without spoiling anything, I'll try to be vague but be warned. One of them would be after Elias visits the hospital and shows up at Oskars window, somehow the utter tenderness of that scene with them just..holding each-other gets to me. It's such a strange display of humanity among a lot of inhuman actions leading to and following after it. *SPOILER*This may seem odd to some people but when Hakan is propositioning for a child prostitute but can't go through with it. Again, a lot of people will probably not get me at all when I say this but in a way I felt bad for Hakan in that he genuinely believed he loved Elias and in an almost childish manner seemed to think if he tried hard enough Eli would love him back. He's a desperate character and I really enjoyed him. And finally. The very end taking place on a train. To me it was escaping-something I wasn't able to do.

Worst book:
Like many before me and after me I tried to give Twilight a try. I worked at a bookstore for some time so there where a few times I attempted to give popular books a go figuring "Hey they must be popular for a reason" but fell short to me each time. My sister swears Nicholas Sparks is some hot shit but I don't see it :/ I couldn't get into any of his books..ever..no matter how hard I tried. I loved the anime of Howl's Moving Castle so before I left I bought the children's book....but I am finding I like the anime quite a bit more. In-fact I don't think I'll ever finish the book at all....and you must understand I was absolutely THRILLED to get this book. I skipped home on a rainbow assured that this novel was going to rock my socks...but there's something about the writing that I simply..cannot get into. It feels so much more dry and dull than I was expecting and somehow far less creative and fantastical. Even putting aside the film version I am disappointed.

Flora88
01-30-2011, 10:47 AM
I meant the school system - 9th grade means nothing to me. I doubt it's the same as being a 9th year, because that's thirteen.

Hmm. Well, I went into ninth grade at...late thirteen, early fourteen, I think, if that helps. :)

But, on the "dark, awful school reading" train of thought, I agree that there's a total bias toward the hopeless. Usually, by the time you get into high school you're reading a lot of horrible, depressing shit.
I mean, A Separate Peace? Really? God, I hated that book.

Apsara
01-30-2011, 10:49 AM
I recommend Twelve by Jasper Kent (http://www.amazon.com/Twelve-Jasper-Kent/dp/1616142413/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_1). Not a favorite or even a best but this is how vampires should be written. Dirty, repulsive and remorseless with no ridiculous religious moral lessons or worse, romantic ending...for anyone.

rinya
01-30-2011, 11:10 AM
Some of the best books I have ever read are Interview With The Vampire (seriously read that book in three days, I loved it so much), The Word/Void trilogy by Terry Brooks, Good Omens, and Sabriel. Sabriel especially is dear to me, since I've been reading it over and over since high school. There's something about the way the author writes that makes it so easy to visualize. It also doesn't feel like a traditional fantasy novel, which is refreshing to me. There are no elves, or dwarves, or dragons, and the magic used in the books has specific functions, not to mention that nearly every time its used there is some sort of payment the user must make to access its power. It seems a great degree more realistic than having a random wizard in command of a huge reservoir of magic and have no consequences when he uses it. The Word/Void trilogy is a lot like this as well. It's set in the modern world, and the magic used is both beneficial and hazardous to the characters who can use it. Stock fantasy races are absent in favor of more interesting creatures from the author's imagination.

The worst book I have ever attempted to read has to be The Ravenscar Dynasty. I shudder to think that I even touched that book, let alone tried to read it. The prose was shoddy at best, the love scenes so trite as to be almost hilarious. The synopsis on the cover was more interesting than the actual story. When that happens, you know you've got a giant failbomb of a book.

The Hag
01-30-2011, 11:19 AM
Let The Right One In (Lat Den Ratte Komma In) by John Ajvide Lindqvist

Ha Ha. I just bought this but haven't read it yet.


I mean, A Separate Peace? Really? God, I hated that book.

O GAWD. I actually can't say it's bad though because I couldn't make it past like the first 10 pages.

Some of the best books I have ever read are Interview With The Vampire

I also liked this a lot but didn't like any of her later books.

Volnixshin
01-30-2011, 11:20 AM
The Night Angel trilogy has been the best set of books I have read in a long time.


The worst is Twilight

sam vimes
01-30-2011, 01:36 PM
I mean, A Separate Peace? Really? God, I hated that book.

Ugh. Phineas as such a complete load.

Nicholas Sparks

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&sugexp=gsih&xhr=t&q=nicholas+sparks+is+a+douchebag&cp=18&qe=bmljaG9sYXMgc3BhcmtzIGlz&qesig=K-0sm8JU3JLX0DhgiRPHPw&pkc=AFgZ2tnMGBw8zD8NpaaTJdhd_dy0zftvYyK6vSk0NQqB3g OYngRc9L4_0nfvDJxrBsgPfW9HJLuVYmgEMdF0MlEAp2H_Uqnj VQ&pf=p&sclient=psy&aq=0&aqi=&aql=f&oq=nicholas+sparks+is&pbx=1&fp=dded8f20a6bb9442

UsakoLuna
01-30-2011, 03:55 PM
Best Book? You expect me to pick just one?!
I can't, I'm going to list the books that I loved enough to re-buy onto my kindle.
American Gods - Neil Gaiman
StarDust - Neil Gaiman
Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden

I have several others that I love almost as much, but I love reading these three when I need to get lost in another world.

Worst book: Breaking Dawn - Stephenie Meyers

Brsis
01-31-2011, 04:13 AM
Hmm. Well, I went into ninth grade at...late thirteen, early fourteen, I think, if that helps. :)


Hmm, okay then, so I guess they do correspond 1-1 more or less (Most people turn fourteen at some time during year 9 or before they get into year 10) - except now I'm even more confused because I wouldn't have thought Shakespeare or Wuthering Heights were particularly challenging for thirteen-year-olds (We were doing Chaucer in class - un-'translated' - at fourteen, so maybe I'm biased)

I always knew I was in the minority for loving sad books, but I'm still confused about the logic which lead to the exam board deciding that we needed to read either Of Mice and Men, Frankenstein or Lord of the Flies.

... so, you want us to learn that human beings are selfish, cruel, intolerant creatures? WE'VE BEEN IN SCHOOL FOR TEN YEARS, WE KNOW THAT ALREADY.

UsakoLuna
01-31-2011, 08:26 AM
... so, you want us to learn that human beings are selfish, cruel, intolerant creatures? WE'VE BEEN IN SCHOOL FOR TEN YEARS, WE KNOW THAT ALREADY.

that was awesome!

In 9th grade we had to read "Romeo and Juilet", "The Diary of Fredrick Douglas", "The Odessy", "The Illead", "Ishmeal", "The Yellow Wallpaper" And "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" I don't know if that's typical though, I was in honors English.

Flora88
01-31-2011, 09:15 AM
Hmm, okay then, so I guess they do correspond 1-1 more or less (Most people turn fourteen at some time during year 9 or before they get into year 10) - except now I'm even more confused because I wouldn't have thought Shakespeare or Wuthering Heights were particularly challenging for thirteen-year-olds (We were doing Chaucer in class - un-'translated' - at fourteen, so maybe I'm biased)

I always knew I was in the minority for loving sad books, but I'm still confused about the logic which lead to the exam board deciding that we needed to read either Of Mice and Men, Frankenstein or Lord of the Flies.

... so, you want us to learn that human beings are selfish, cruel, intolerant creatures? WE'VE BEEN IN SCHOOL FOR TEN YEARS, WE KNOW THAT ALREADY.

I know, right? They aren't. Kids are totally capable of reading that sort of thing at...hmmm...at least a seventh-grade level. That's how we did it at my school, anyway. We didn't mess with Chaucer in depth until twelfth grade, though, and generally studied more American authors.
Of course, it's different for every state. In the States, each state has its own education system, its own sort of reading list, and its own ideas of what is and isn't appropriate for which grade level. Usually, each teacher chooses his or her own group of books from which she'd like to teach, and centers her class around these books. It's different for each teacher, and each school, and each state. This, of course, means that every state's educational goals as far as English is concerned are very different. For example, there's a vast difference in what the kids in Texas read as opposed to the kids in Louisiana, and these states border each other.
So, as to what's read where at what grade level, it all depends on the state, school, and teacher. :)

I actually liked Lord of the Flies. Lol. The Grapes of Wrath, though...ugh...the breast-feeding scene...Jesus...
Why? (????)

If I end up becoming a teacher, my students are going to read some badass literature. None of this John Knowles or Pearl S. Buck nonsense. The Good Earth, by the way, was intolerable.

Firefly026
01-31-2011, 09:45 AM
Favorite book(s): The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen, The Harry Potter Series by JK Rowling, Perks of being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky, and that's mainly for nostalgic reasons lol.

Worst: Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger. Oh God, how I HATE this book... I have to stop thinking about it before I rage.
Also, Breaking Dawn by Stephanie Meyer. Fan fics were probably better. The entire series sucks, but I liked it when I was in like... 9th grade. But this is the absolute worst one, IMO.
Blindness by Jose Saramago. I might've liked it if there was, you know... punctuation.
Sex, Drugs & Cocoa Puff by Chuck Klosterman. All of my friends loved this guy, he just seemed to piss me off for some reason.

Brsis
01-31-2011, 10:05 AM
I
I actually liked Lord of the Flies. Lol. The Grapes of Wrath, though...ugh...the breast-feeding scene...Jesus...
Why? (????)

If I end up becoming a teacher, my students are going to read some badass literature. None of this John Knowles or Pearl S. Buck nonsense. The Good Earth, by the way, was intolerable.

Me too, although I was sad we didn't get to do Frankenstein. After reading Of Mice and Men, though, I haven't felt the need to pick up any of Steinbeck's other books XD It wasn't bad, it just didn't do anything for me.

On the other hand, they made us read Far From The Madding Crowd, which I disliked intensely, but I later picked up Jude the Obscure which turned out to be pretty damn good, so maybe I shouldn't write him off completely.

I think according to one of the teachers, the selling point of the final year English class at my secondary school was that all the books on the list were banned from schools in Texas :P I have no idea if that's true or not (Only that - given that they were The Handmaid's Tale, Oranges Aren't The Only Fruit, and The Colour Purple - everyone else seemed to notice a slightly different theme)

While we're doing Best and Worst - what about So Bad They're Good books? AKA this is me trying to displace my guilt about how quickly I read the Sookie Stackhouse novels. I cannot process this logically. They're utter trash, and I cannot write this off as horrified fascination with the rural Deep South any further, and yet I've finished every single one in more or less one sitting. 0.0

UsakoLuna
01-31-2011, 10:23 AM
I love the sookie books! They are such simple, easy reads. Something about them just sucks you in. I read thru them so fast though, it kind of drives me nuts

penny_dreadful
01-31-2011, 10:32 AM
While we're doing Best and Worst - what about So Bad They're Good books? AKA this is me trying to displace my guilt about how quickly I read the Sookie Stackhouse novels. I cannot process this logically. They're utter trash, and I cannot write this off as horrified fascination with the rural Deep South any further, and yet I've finished every single one in more or less one sitting. 0.0

I know exactly what you mean. I haven't read them all, or even close to it, but they're like... I don't know, like movie theater popcorn. You know it's not good for you, it has no redeeming qualities, and after a while you don't even like it anymore, but you have to get some every time and then you can't stop eating it until it's gone.

Very few of the characters are really, deeply likable, but Sookie especially became so irritating so quickly. And even though it's the television show, not the books, I will always have a soft spot for Lafayette and Pam, so I can't hate the books too much because they brought those two into my life.

Blood_Sword
01-31-2011, 10:36 AM
I have a LOT of favorite books, but my most favorite is definitely Howl's Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones. It is very different from the Miyazaki movie, though the movie is a favorite of mine too. I just find the book terribly enchanting, original, and fabulous. Again though, I have FAR too many favorites.

Oh, I've read that one! (I own the Miyazaki movie too)
And I have to say that it's true that they are different from one another in many cases, but both are still really good.

Pocketfightr
01-31-2011, 11:25 AM
Recently, I've incredibly enjoyed The Invisible Man (had no clue how rage filled that guy was going to be <3 ) and most of the way through The Three Musketeers (I don't know if it's just because the characters are French and I read them in an amusing tone or what, but I am highly amused). On the longer term, anything by Douglas Adams and some of the short stories by Kurt Vonnegut (I love the Welcome to the Monkey House collection) are pretty much in my list of favorites.

Gulliver's Travels has been the worst thing I've read in the past year. It's not so much that it was poorly written but I think because I'm not the best at history that I failed to comprehend everything relating to real stuff that had been happening in Europe. So much flipping to the back of the book to read the notes made it hard to enjoy. (I can't fully complain I bought it for dirt cheap when a bookstore was closing.)

Flora88
01-31-2011, 02:55 PM
...all the books on the list were banned from schools in Texas :P I have no idea if that's true or not (Only that - given that they were The Handmaid's Tale, Oranges Aren't The Only Fruit, and The Colour Purple - everyone else seemed to notice a slightly different theme)

I cannot write this off as horrified fascination with the rural Deep South any further, and yet I've finished every single one in more or less one sitting. 0.0

As far as I know, that's not true. My school taught both The Handmaid's Tale and The Color Purple. It could have been true about a ring of private schools, though. They do their own thing.

The Deep South is really fascinating (and I say this not simply because I live in it) but make sure you don't read the trash and take it for truth. The South isn't nearly as "backward" as people like to think.
I've not read the Sookie Stackhouse books, but I live in the area in which the books are set...and from what I understand, the books not even close to being accurate as to the setting.
Sadly, everyone wants to write a Southern Gothic novel. Especially people who have never been to the South and are operating purely on belief in specific stereotypes...stereotypes that the genre is supposed to try to avoid.
This is where a lot of the poorly-written, poorly-imagined stuff comes from. >_<

Personally, I love The Little Friend by Donna Tartt, "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" by Joyce Carol Oates, The Green Mile by Stephen King, Quietus by someone I've forgotten, Purple Jesus by someone else I've forgotten, anything by Flannery O'Connor, anything by Eudora Welty, and so forth.

Proper Southern Gothic should be more along the lines of "A Rose for Emily" than Twilight, in my opinion.

As for So Bad it's Good, the gold star has to go to Six Geese A-Slaying. That was marvelously bad.

ThakYuki
01-31-2011, 06:19 PM
Sadly, everyone wants to write a Southern Gothic novel. Especially people who have never been to the South and are operating purely on belief in specific stereotypes...stereotypes that the genre is supposed to try to avoid.
This is where a lot of the poorly-written, poorly-imagined stuff comes from. >_<

Since we live in Texas, we obviously wear cowboy boots, a cowboy hat, work on a farm, own a horse (and ride it to school), have a country accent, know nothing about advanced technology, root for the Dallas Cowboys, etc, etc. *shoots stereotypes*

Big appleton
01-31-2011, 09:41 PM
Been a fan of Jules Vernes since I picked up 20,000 leagues at the ripe age of 10, since then, I switched to Tom Clancy novels for that extra piece of action. But there will always be a place for Verne in my heart :D

HomeDepot
01-31-2011, 10:04 PM
Wow this is hard to pick. For the best book, I'll say 1984 because I found it both fun and interesting to read and it changed my world-view forever.

The worst book I've ever read was the Silmarillion. I love Tolkien but that was one of only a handful of books I have ever given up on finishing. It was so so so dry.

p.s Already Dead by Charlie Huston is also a good vampire book, because it is not a vampire book. It's a hardboiled detective novel that incidentally has vampires in it.

Hanyaan
02-01-2011, 02:34 AM
While we're doing Best and Worst - what about So Bad They're Good books? AKA this is me trying to displace my guilt about how quickly I read the Sookie Stackhouse novels. I cannot process this logically. They're utter trash, and I cannot write this off as horrified fascination with the rural Deep South any further, and yet I've finished every single one in more or less one sitting. 0.0

Oh man, I have the same problem. They're totally godawful... and I can't stop reading them.

When I look back carefully, a lot of my favorite books ever are YA. Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones has held the throne for me for "favorite book of all time" since I was young (and way before the movie was even announced, let alone aired anywhere). I love her writing tons. I could go on for ages about why HMC is so wonderful but well, I think I've done that enough on Coscom throughout the years. Suffice to say I love it. I'll throw in my lot with all the people who love Sabriel and its sequels. I quite like a lot of other things Garth Nix has written, but that series is my favorite of his by far. And also in the YA field, Tamora Pierce is one of my favorite authors ever and I will be grateful to her books until the day I die. There is a serious dearth of female-positive fantasy for any age group out there, and even more so for younger girls (the only other decent one I can think of that is appropriate for/aimed at younger readers is Robin McKinley's duet of The Blue Sword and Hero and the Crown, but those are not only a trickier read in an odder writing style that puts a lot of younger people off, but they're also starting to show their age a little). Tamora Pierce's books, however, are like the literary equivalent of frozen yogurt; so delightful and refreshing you don't even notice that they're actually pretty good for you.

I like the existence of Good Omens because not only is it a fantastic book in its own right, but it saves me a little bit from having to say "pretty much everything written by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett" because look, they did something together, isn't that nifty? And while this is the best books ever thread, I'd also like to throw in something I've been enjoying lately to an almost insane degree; Johannes Cabal the Necromancer (http://www.amazon.com/Johannes-Cabal-Necromancer-Jonathan-Howard/dp/0767930762/ref=tmm_pap_title_0), and its sequel, Johannes Cabal the Detective. I have never before seen an author actually honest to god make a fundamentally rather unlikeable main character into an asset rather than a hindrance and actually have it work.

Worst book? I don't know if I can answer "worst" book, but I can definitely answer "least favorite" and it is, hands down, Lord of the Flies. Ugh. The less I say about that the better, other than that by various quirks of teachers not coordinating and switching school districts, I had it assigned to me in one class or another for seven years in a row. I did not like it the first time. I thought it was rather poorly written and a bad idea to assign to students of that age; what that first social studies teacher was doing assigning kids to act it out I have not a bleeding clue, but it was nonetheless a terrible idea. So yeah, I totally hated it the first time through. And then I got assigned the same book six times again. You can guess about how much I liked it the seventh time.

Brsis
02-01-2011, 06:40 AM
The Deep South is really fascinating (and I say this not simply because I live in it) but make sure you don't read the trash and take it for truth. The South isn't nearly as "backward" as people like to think.
I've not read the Sookie Stackhouse books, but I live in the area in which the books are set...and from what I understand, the books not even close to being accurate as to the setting.


I think Harris is (Or was) a native Louisianan, so while I don't doubt it's exaggerated (I live in Oxford - if I believed the books, I wouldn't be able to get to work without tripping over a corpse) little things like what wild life there is, what food people are making, the clothes they wear to different occasions, and the houses they live in fascinate me. The kind of stuff it almost doesn't occur to the writer to make up when they're writing about a place they live/lived in.

I'm glad I'm not alone, though - I agree totally with EVERYONE who's weighed in on the Sookie Stackhouse series! I feel sort of guilty for even admitting to reading them (Even though I don't feel guilty about admitting to reading Twilight) but they're just so addictive... and they put out what they promise - vampires, werewolves, other supernatural crap, horrible murders, a very un-pretentious sex scene or two and everything gets wrapped up by the end of the book. I didn't get into True Blood until really late, but when I finally watched it I was quite alarmed at how much of the 'spirit' of the books they got bang on - and how many of the characters looked and acted exactly as they should >.>

Also; Given that Never Let Me Go is coming out in cinemas soon, can I give a big push for Kazuo Ishiguro as one of the most talented writers I've ever read in my life? His prose is sublime, and the slow reveal in Remains of the Day blew my mind it was so subtly and elegantly done. Nothing much actually HAPPENS in most of his books, but they're that kind of book that's not just enjoyable for the plot but enjoyable for the words the author is using.

BsWN
02-01-2011, 10:27 AM
Worst has to be... This one called City Of Bones. It had potential but was so boring that my grandmother had a hard time staying interested in it. >.< Wish I'd known that before I'd bought it.


Best... I have a list =P

-The Luxe Series by Anna Godbersen

Add on Explaination= I love these books because of the history in it. The author took some of the classic drama cliches and put back to the late 1800s. The dresses are beautiful, the romance good, and the dramam is a bit over-rated but still good overall. Only part I didn't appreciate was when Henry went off to war and Diana followed him. I got pissed and didn't read the next book for about two months. But then I was pleasantly surprised with how she twisted the seemingly over-done drama.)

- Anything and Everything by Kevin Brooks
Explanation= Don't even get me started on the rough, down to Earth veiws on his plots and the plots themselves! His characters are interesting and his plots gritty. Only book of his that I've read that I don't like that much so far is Road Of The Dead, love all the others that I've read.

-The Warriors Series by Erin Hunter.
Explanation= It was the first series I ever really got into. Whether it be a good thing or not it will always have a place in my heart.

-Last, anything with good Romance.
Explanation= You have to love the love-drama ^^

penny_dreadful
02-01-2011, 10:33 AM
Worst book? I don't know if I can answer "worst" book, but I can definitely answer "least favorite" and it is, hands down, Lord of the Flies. Ugh. The less I say about that the better, other than that by various quirks of teachers not coordinating and switching school districts, I had it assigned to me in one class or another for seven years in a row. I did not like it the first time. I thought it was rather poorly written and a bad idea to assign to students of that age; what that first social studies teacher was doing assigning kids to act it out I have not a bleeding clue, but it was nonetheless a terrible idea. So yeah, I totally hated it the first time through. And then I got assigned the same book six times again. You can guess about how much I liked it the seventh time.

Lord of the Flies was one of my favorite reading assignments. Re-reading it sold me on the name we picked out for a son. No, not Piggy. I do agree having students act it out is probably not especially prudent, but I'm sure the teacher thought it would really make the brutality hit home or something.

Axelai
02-01-2011, 10:43 AM
Lord of the Flies was one of my favorite reading assignments. Re-reading it sold me on the name we picked out for a son. No, not Piggy. I do agree having students act it out is probably not especially prudent, but I'm sure the teacher thought it would really make the brutality hit home or something.

Only thing i remember about reading Lord of the Flies in high school:

The entire class shouting "PIGGY!!! NOOOOO!!!!!"

The Hag
02-01-2011, 11:35 AM
anything by Flannery O'Connor

That lady's stuff is sick! In the best sense of the word. One of my favorite quotes of all time is at the end of A Good Man is Hard to Find: "She would of been a good woman if there had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life."

Since we live in Texas, we obviously wear cowboy boots, a cowboy hat, work on a farm, own a horse (and ride it to school), have a country accent, know nothing about advanced technology, root for the Dallas Cowboys, etc, etc. *shoots stereotypes*

It may be stereotypical, but OMG I love Lonesome Dove! <3<3<3 Best existential western EVER!

No, not Piggy.

XD I actually didn't like it the first time I read it, but then had to read it for a class and became a fan. I had a kick-ass English teacher in middle school.

EgnirysFaye
02-01-2011, 11:50 AM
Best..

The Dark Tower (Renamed as Princess in the Tower in some publications) By Sharon Stewart. I read this when I was a young girl, 12-13 years old. It is the only novel I have ever reread. It's about the French Revolution, but from the viewpoint of Marie Therese Charlotte, daughter of King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette. Has a special place in my heart! I know it is listed as "Juvenile Fiction" but when I read it, it didn't seem that juvenile at all, so it suits an older crowd.


The Light Bearer by Donna Gillespie. Good read, about a female warrior who was forced to become a Gladiator during the era of Ancient Rome. Unfortuntely, I did NOT like the sequel...Lady of the Light. So stick with the first book lol


Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien - I don't think I need to get into detail with this one, haha.

I also have a soft spot of mystery and whodunnits since I grew up with them, Agatha Christie, Sherlock Holmes series...the works :)


Worst...


Pilate's Wife by Antoinette May. What a disapointment. The main character is whiney, needy, contradicting and very Mary-Sue ish. Spents the first book trying to get what she wants without listening to anyone or any warnings..then gets what she wants, and spends the rest of the book complaining about it. The only real passable part was the scene prior to The Crucifixion at the very very end.

Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy. We had to read this for an English class. I know it is a classic and all, but it was painfully depressing. Didn't even bother finishing it.

Axis Trilogy/Wayfarer Redemption by Sarah Douglas. I admit, I did enjoy the first book. But it all changed once I continued the next one. It pissed me off. The author builds up one of the main female characters to be likable, and to have her be paired with another main male character, the so-called hero of the book. The female character is then forced to marry someone she doesn't love, and severly suffers through it. But the guy goes off (Despite his promise of loyalty) sleeps with someone else, marries that person, gets her pregnant, and apparently we are suppose to hate the original female character all of a sudden, and love the new oh-so-awesome-magic-fighter woman and love match. WTF? Hell no, you can't go do something like that. Sorry if it sounds petty, but it was bloody annoying. I then couldn't stand the main male character because of his crudeness and attitude, nor the second main female character for being typical and unsympathetic. Stopped reading.


A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess. I'm sorry, no.....just noo.


Unforuntely I can't remember the title, but there was a book that was about a group/family that reincarnate to meet again throughout generations, from the ice age through modern times. It had a ridiculous amount of sex scenes. I'm afraid I am really not interested in regular neanderthal mating and rape, for one thing. Overall made humans look very animalistic, and some of the history was very inaccurate. I gave the book away immediately.



There is a lot more, since I was always a major bookworm and took many classes that consists of requiring readings, but I'll leave it at that for now before I drive people crazy with even a longer list.

Brsis
02-01-2011, 12:16 PM
Unforuntely I can't remember the title, but there was a book that was about a group/family that reincarnate to meet again throughout generations, from the ice age through modern times. It had a ridiculous amount of sex scenes. I'm afraid I am really not interested in regular neanderthal mating and rape, for one thing. Overall made humans look very animalistic, and some of the history was very inaccurate. I gave the book away immediately.
.

Reincarnation by Suzanne Weyn, by any chance? The plot summary rung a bell - I can't remember if I've read this one or not, but it's in one of the boxes.

UsakoLuna
02-01-2011, 01:55 PM
I am currently re-reading "A Handmaids Tail", I found it when I was moving something in my moms room. I really like that book

sam vimes
02-01-2011, 03:46 PM
Best..A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess. I'm sorry, no.....just noo.

Whatever opinion of the plot, there's no way you can hate the book from a technical standpoint. Burgess is a genius with language.

The Hag
02-01-2011, 03:55 PM
Whatever opinion of the plot, there's no way you can hate the book from a technical standpoint.

I would say the same thing about Jude the Obscure.

Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy. We had to read this for an English class. I know it is a classic and all, but it was painfully depressing.

It was that. It was so grim that it's hard to say that I "enjoyed" reading it. However, it was also a brilliant and powerful work about the social, class and gender issues of that period. "Because we are too many" haunts me to this day. Again - here's where I'd like to point out the difference between "Favorite/Least Favorite" and "Best/Worst". Jude the Obscure isn't my favorite Hardy (that would probably be The Mayor of Casterbridge) but is it definitely his best.

And why so little non-fiction love? Two of the best histories I've ever read: The Longest Day and Battle Cry of Freedom.

sam vimes
02-01-2011, 04:00 PM
And why so little non-fiction love? Two of the best histories I've ever read: The Longest Day and Battle Cry of Freedom.

Tai-Pan, by James Clavell.

Trololololol:angel2:

ashelia89
02-01-2011, 04:15 PM
Tony Alamo's pamphlet...that was just ridiculous.

ShadowYazoo
02-01-2011, 05:49 PM
Been a fan of Jules Vernes since I picked up 20,000 leagues at the ripe age of 10, since then, I switched to Tom Clancy novels for that extra piece of action. But there will always be a place for Verne in my heart :D

Seconded :D I am a big fan of Jules Verne novels, and 20000 leagues was the first one I read and will always be one of my favorites.

Favorite part: "The sea is everything. It covers seven tenths of the terrestrial globe. Its breath is pure and healthy. It is an immense desert, where man is never lonely, for he feels life stirring on all sides."

"Think of it: On the surface, there is hunger and fear. Men still exercise unjust laws. They fight and tear one another to pieces. A mere few feet beneath the waves, their reign ceases, their evil drowns. Here on the ocean floor is the only independence. Here, I am free. Imagine what would happen if they controlled machines such as this submarine boat. Far better that they think there's a monster and hunt me with harpoons"

I also enjoyed LOTR series, Avalon by T.A. Barron and Animorphs by K.A. Applegate. Avalon had a uniquie and vibrantly described world and not just one protagonist but a group of them, each on a different but not unrelated quest. The good part of Animorphs series is how well the author describes what it is like to see the world through the animal's eyes.

Worst book will have to be Eragon, the only (barely) redeeming part of that book is the dragon. All other characters are bland and borrowed from many other, better stories.

penny_dreadful
02-01-2011, 07:23 PM
The best book I'm reading right now is Lynne Truss's Eats, Shoots and Leaves:

The rule is: the word "it's" (with apostrophe) stands for "it is" or "it has". If the word does not stand for "it is" or "it has" then what you require is "its". This is extremely easy to grasp. Getting your itses mixed up is the greatest solecism in the world of punctuation. No matter that you have a PhD and have read all of Henry James twice. If you still persist in writing, "Good food at it's best", you deserve to be struck by lightning, hacked up on the spot and buried in an unmarked grave.

This book speaks to me deeply.

Dragonomine
02-02-2011, 09:01 AM
ATM I'm reading the Mars Series by Edgar Rice Burroughs (again). Free upload to the Kindle I got myself for Christmas. Best. Gift. Ever. My daughter is telling me to hurry up so I can read the Hunger Games.

stormily
02-04-2011, 03:51 AM
The best book I've read...well, one of my favorites is Perfume. As for fantasy, the A Song of Ice and Fire series is wonderful. And then there's Harry Potter, which I've loved throughout my childhood...and the Handmaid's Tale.

supergeekgirl
02-04-2011, 12:00 PM
Most bad books get put down within minutes unless I had to read them for a class or something. What is the worst? There was some really bad fantasy I read in high school while attempting to find something good.... I know! Fountainhead. I hate the book. It's huge and wordy and about practically nothing. And Ayn Rand can suck my giant metal... you pet the giture.

The best book I've ever read... probably The Master and Margarita. I love that book. It inspired many fan art doodles back when I was in high school. My favorite book, however, is The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. I make a distinction because, while it's a great book, it's not the "best book" though it thrills and amuses me every time I read it.

Must add another to my list of best books after reading this again. Neverwhere. It's by Neil Gaiman but underrated. Beautiful twisted fantasy, but I desperately wish it had been a series. *drools on Hunter* But the comic book version... not so much.

@All of you Jules Verne fans, my husband agrees. He's incredibly obsessed with Jules Verne. My favorite character from anything ever may be The Boss, but his is definitely Captain Nemo.

Dragonomine
02-04-2011, 12:16 PM
There was a book I read a few years ago that I found to be thought provoking. I hadn't read anything like that for a very long time. But this one really makes you think ... this could be plausible... Memnock the Devil by Anne Rice. I don't recommend many books but that one is very interesting.

Pocketfightr
02-04-2011, 12:55 PM
Fountainhead. I hate the book. It's huge and wordy and about practically nothing. And Ayn Rand can suck my giant metal... you pet the giture.


Oh god, I was blocking that one from my memory! I only read through the whole thing because there was a scholarship you could get for writing an essay about it. I don't know why I even bothered.

sam vimes
02-04-2011, 02:37 PM
The Phantom Tollbooth wasn't to shabby.

yamibakura03
02-04-2011, 02:52 PM
The best I read are: East of Eden( Steinbeck), The plague by Albert camus, and 1984 by George Orwell. Cien años de Soledad (one hundred years of solitude) by Gabriel García Márquez was good too. I have a few more but I can't think right now.

Worst: Besides Twilight, I couln't not read The Silver Chair ( Chronicles of Narnia) by C.S Lewis. It was boring for me.

Flora88
02-04-2011, 03:07 PM
The Phantom Tollbooth wasn't to shabby.

The Phantom Tollbooth is amazing. It's one of those vastly underrated books floating around out there.

Ritsu H Saotome
02-04-2011, 03:34 PM
Worst: Sense and Sensibility

Best (finished): 1984

Best (unfinished): Capitalism and freedom

sam vimes
02-04-2011, 04:22 PM
Worst: EAT, PRAY, & MOTHERFUCKING LOVE

Last time I attempted any pick for Oprah's Book Club. It was a catastrophe wrapped in white privilege from start to finish. Should have been named I Took Off For A Year While All Of You Were Working, & Just Look At All The Non-Caucasian Friends Who I Treated As Means To An End.

C. Marie
02-04-2011, 04:22 PM
Seriously disliked Surrender by Sonya Hartnett. After awhile I didn't understand what was going on, and it was a struggle to finish that (due to it being for school).

penny_dreadful
02-04-2011, 04:56 PM
Worst: EAT, PRAY, & MOTHERFUCKING LOVE

Last time I attempted any pick for Oprah's Book Club. It was a catastrophe wrapped in white privilege from start to finish. Should have been named I Took Off For A Year While All Of You Were Working, & Just Look At All The Non-Caucasian Friends Who I Treated As Means To An End.

I know I can't express a really accurate opinion since I didn't finish it-- maybe by the end she was all, "and my experiences in other cultures made me realize I truly am a whiny, entitled brat and should shut up and start helping other people instead of getting even richer off the brave journey I made to nourish my rich, white soul," but I haven't gotten that impression.

How Oprah even kept a straight face while Elizabeth Gilbert was all, "I was successful and wealthy but I didn't like my husband and I was sad and then I got a divorce but then I was still sad so then I got paid to spend a year indulging myself all over the world and learned the key to happiness and fulfillment is doing whatever the hell you feel like in Paradise-on-Earth and having someone else foot the bill and finally I found true love with a dashing Brazilian millionaire ISN'T MY STORY INSPIRING," I honestly do not know. By page 4 I was like this (http://media.photobucket.com/image/bitch%20please%20gif/danceloversteph/6a00d83451b8c369e20120a937b388970b-800wi.gif?o=8).

Worst part is my mother gave it to me to read, so when she asked me what I thought of it I had to be all DO YOU REALLY WANT TO KNOW, MOM?

lyraparry11
02-04-2011, 08:19 PM
The Phantom Tollbooth is amazing. It's one of those vastly underrated books floating around out there.

I liked that book quite a bit, we read it in school in fifth grade and did a play. I was chroma, the "master of color, maestro of pigment" (still remember one of my lines) lol.

My favorite is either a clockwork orange, by Anthony burgess, or his dark materials (trilogy) by Philip Pullman.

My least favorite was the oddysey. I read it for school freshman year, and I just couldn't stand it.

The Hag
02-04-2011, 08:40 PM
The plague by Albert camus

Such a great book. Why do they make everyone read The Stranger instead?

Worst: EAT, PRAY, & MOTHERFUCKING LOVE


This was one of those books that I totally judged by it's cover. I read the cover and thought, "I'm about 100% sure I would totally hate this book."


The Phantom Tollbooth is amazing. It's one of those vastly underrated books floating around out there.

I think that people generally rate it pretty high. But maybe it's not as popular now as it was back when I read it (a really long time ago!)

supergeekgirl
02-05-2011, 04:15 PM
Worst: EAT, PRAY, & MOTHERFUCKING LOVE

Last time I attempted any pick for Oprah's Book Club. It was a catastrophe wrapped in white privilege from start to finish. Should have been named I Took Off For A Year While All Of You Were Working, & Just Look At All The Non-Caucasian Friends Who I Treated As Means To An End.

It's not a book I would think to read, but everyone kept asking me if I watched the movie. No. No, I didn't. Your description sounds exactly like what I expected, so I'm glad I didn't waste a moment on it.

bodatheyoda
02-05-2011, 04:18 PM
worst book I ever read was 'To Kill a Mockingbird' I HATED it...I couldn't read it at all >.<

Ita
02-05-2011, 04:39 PM
Worst is definitely "hush, hush" by Becca Fitzpatrick. Seriously, best-selling? HOW?

The best, "The eyes of the dragon" by Stephen King.

penny_dreadful
02-05-2011, 05:19 PM
worst book I ever read was 'To Kill a Mockingbird' I HATED it...I couldn't read it at all >.<

WHAAAAAAT? Maybe it's because we read it with one of my favorite teachers, but I think that book is absolutely freaking amazing.

yamibakura03
02-05-2011, 08:21 PM
Such a great book. Why do they make everyone read The Stranger instead?

So true! I have no idea why. When I was in the 12th grade they made us read The Stranger. I really would of liked they pick The Plague but they didn't.

supergeekgirl
02-05-2011, 11:05 PM
The best, "The eyes of the dragon" by Stephen King.

That's a pretty good book! Not one of his better known, but I enjoyed it thoroughly.

penny_dreadful
02-07-2011, 02:35 PM
Oh, Brian Jacques, I am remembering you fondly today: we have lost one of YA literature's great heroes (http://shelf-life.ew.com/2011/02/07/brian-jacques-redwall-dies-71/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+entertainmentweekly%2Fshelf-life+%28Entertainment+Weekly%2FEW.com%27s%3A+Shelf +Life%29). I swear one day I will have a Redwall-inspired feast in your honor, just like I've been planning to do since I read Mossflower when I was seven.

Brsis
02-07-2011, 04:01 PM
Well, damn. I had every single Redwall book released between the year I turned nine and the year I turned sixteen in hardcover - The Pearls Of Lutra was always my favourite, but I liked all the Marion books, and Marlfox.

I think I should round out my collection with the last handful I don't have and put them aside for when my niece grows up.

sam vimes
02-07-2011, 04:16 PM
Anything from Terry Pratchett's Discworld series from Moving Pictures onwards. Not that his earlier Discworld books weren't good, it's just by then he had worked out all the kinks.

supergeekgirl
02-07-2011, 06:40 PM
Oh, Brian Jacques, I am remembering you fondly today: we have lost one of YA literature's great heroes (http://shelf-life.ew.com/2011/02/07/brian-jacques-redwall-dies-71/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+entertainmentweekly%2Fshelf-life+%28Entertainment+Weekly%2FEW.com%27s%3A+Shelf +Life%29). I swear one day I will have a Redwall-inspired feast in your honor, just like I've been planning to do since I read Mossflower when I was seven.

OMG, yes! I had some Redwall-inspired food at our wedding because of those books. :)

penny_dreadful
02-09-2011, 12:39 PM
OMG, yes! I had some Redwall-inspired food at our wedding because of those books. :)

That's amazing. Sometimes I wonder what sort of market there would be for a Redwall-inspired cookbook. I have Winnie-the-Pooh, Star Wars, and Discworld cookbooks, so I'm guessing someone besides me would probably be interested. I would 100% write that cookbook.

In other lit-related news: Good Omens may be coming to television (http://foresthouse.livejournal.com/578498.html). Don't know if want?

Also, this (http://www.authors-helping-authors.com/2011/02/authors-beware-of-unprofessional.html) hilarious piece about how people who are avid readers are totally unqualified to review books, because they just don't understaaaand, and if they find your writing formulaic and flat, it's their fault because romance is SUPPOSED to all be the same!

Flora88
02-09-2011, 02:22 PM
Also, this (http://www.authors-helping-authors.com/2011/02/authors-beware-of-unprofessional.html) hilarious piece about how people who are avid readers are totally unqualified to review books, because they just don't understaaaand, and if they find your writing formulaic and flat, it's their fault because romance is SUPPOSED to all be the same!

...Who does she think she's writing for?

penny_dreadful
02-09-2011, 02:31 PM
...Who does she think she's writing for?

Herself and her imaginary sycophants, I can only assume.

The Hag
02-09-2011, 02:46 PM
If they are just stupid bloggers whose opinions don't matter....uh....why does she seem to care so much about what they think? :P

edit: O.k. just read some of the hilarious comments on her blog. She gets totally schooled by an 11-year old girl! XD

Vchan
02-09-2011, 03:49 PM
Best book ever is definitely Messiah by Boris Starling. 'Messed up' doesn't even begin to cover it, it's marvellous. It's about a serial killer and not one to read if you've got a weak stomach. Also China Lake by Meg Gardiner is excellent, I've just finished that one.

Worst book ever? Twilight. I honestly can't believe I sat through that drivel, but at least now I am qualified to criticise and don't have Twifags accusing me that I haven't read it so I don't know what I'm talking about BLAH BLAH BLAH.

I like my crime novels and I'm always after more suggestions, so suggest away!

Brsis
02-10-2011, 01:27 PM
I like my crime novels and I'm always after more suggestions, so suggest away!

I read some serious crime slush. I recently picked up the Aurelio Zen books, which are actually not half bad so far. Also I LOVE LOVE LOVE Stella Duffy's crime fiction, because the world needs more women's crime.

Fellow book lovers! A question. China Mievielle - how the hell do I pronounce his name, and which book should I start with?

penny_dreadful
02-10-2011, 02:06 PM
Fellow book lovers! A question. China Mievielle - how the hell do I pronounce his name, and which book should I start with?

I think it's "MEE-uh-vull," from what Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Mi%C3%A9ville) tells me.

Just a few days ago I finished Perdido Street Station. I had started Kraken, but I wound up putting it down and picking up something else for a while. I think I'll go back to it, but the plot meandered a bit too much to keep my interest, and the protagonist was much less interesting than the secondary and tertiary characters.

What I can say about Perdido Street Station is that I really enjoyed reading it, but it is dark. There's humor, but especially towards the end it gets pretty relentless. Don't go in expecting a feel-good time. Mieville's style is very cool, though, and I'd definitely read other works of his.

Yazoo_the_Kazoo
02-10-2011, 02:45 PM
The worst book I have ever read is David Copperfield by Charles Dickens.
I remember hearing he was paid by the word when writing it however, so that might explain some things. It was so... unapologetically dull. It went on, and on, and on, and on, the pages were so thin, the print was so tiny...
I shouldn't have even had to read it is the worst part! I was in sixth grade, and we were going to read the incredibly watered down version, but no, school messes up the order and instead of sending the damn things back, we get to read a novel that is over seven hundred pages long. By the time I got to the end, I wanted to use the 721 pages to bludgeon my head in. Awful, awful book.
Sorry Charles Dickens, I do love you. Just not this.

I have a long list of favorite books, the Lord of the Rings series, House of the Scorpion, the Harry Potter series, Pride and Prejudice, Fight Club, the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series and the Redwall series being among them, but my abosolute favorite is Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer.
He's just and incredibly humorous writer, I love it. The first one was definitely my favorite. After the third one, things kind of started to go down hill (though the Lost Colony is exempt from that statement).
I know they're supposed to be geared towards younger readers and all that, but I still find them to be hysterically funny. The characters are really well written, and the plot is actually original, which is something hard to come by in the fantasy genre. All in all, the first one is my favorite book ever.

The Hag
02-10-2011, 04:21 PM
Oh no! I love David Copperfield! "Janet! Donkeys!" "Barkus is willing." The oh-so 'umble Uriah Heep. Mr. Micawber is one of my all time favorite characters. I'm so sorry it was spoiled for you by having to read it in the 6th grade. That does seem a little young. You say that you do love Charles Dickens though so you might try picking it up again now that you are older.

I also enjoy the Artemis Fowl series a lot. Holly is quite awesome and "LEP Recon" cracks me up every time. I also agree that the last couple of books have gone downhill a bit.

I'd recommend Sea of Trolls since you like House of the Scorpion.

ShinobiXikyu
02-11-2011, 10:28 PM
On the pronunciation thing, how the HELL do I pronounce "Eyre"? I'm picking my way through Jane Eyre (so far, meh. Victorian lit. is just so bloody flowery and complex and full of run-on sentences that it's hard as hell to be able to focus) and I honestly have no clue how to say her last name. Especially if it's English, so it's probably got an accent or such to it that makes it even odder.

Brsis
02-12-2011, 03:04 AM
On the pronunciation thing, how the HELL do I pronounce "Eyre"? I'm picking my way through Jane Eyre (so far, meh. Victorian lit. is just so bloody flowery and complex and full of run-on sentences that it's hard as hell to be able to focus) and I honestly have no clue how to say her last name. Especially if it's English, so it's probably got an accent or such to it that makes it even odder.

Almost exactly the same as 'air' for all intents and purposes, your accent may vary.

I love Victorian Gothic, but run-on sentences and flowery prose are the bane of the genre (Even though I sort of enjoy them >.>). There are some (relatively) lean, mean specimens out there but they're fairly obscure.

sweetnsassy
02-12-2011, 11:49 AM
The best book(s) I've read are The Knife of Never Letting Go series. My supervisor lent them to me and I loved loved LOVED them. Can't wait to get my own set.

The worst has got to be, hands down, the Twilight series, and more specifically, Breaking Dawn. I really hated that one, much more so than the others. I'm also not much of a fan of The Scarlet Letter. It's not that I hate it, I just find it incredibly boring. I couldn't finish the darn thing.

sam vimes
02-14-2011, 09:17 PM
Best: Watership Down

Made bunnies badass. Case closed.

Flora88
02-14-2011, 09:34 PM
Best: Watership Down

Made bunnies badass. Case closed.

FUCK YES. I totally saw a Fiver cosplay here today. I was in awe, not necessarily of the caliber of the costume, but of the sheer awesomeness one must possess in order to cosplay Watership Down.

(I also totally plan on showing the movie to my anime club for Easter.)

Another awesome book: The Neverending Story. Yes, it does actually end, but it is absolutely amazing. I've loved it for a long time now...to the point of wanting an AURYN on my wedding invitations.
But the writing is beautiful and colorful and full of the wonder of a child. It has this "legendary," "secret" quality that is just wonderful. It is never didactic, though one can learn several lessons through Bastian. And, of course, it is absolutely brimming with symbolism. Seriously, it's one of the best books I've ever read.

Brsis
02-15-2011, 05:40 AM
Best: Watership Down

Made bunnies badass. Case closed.

I cried so much through the film, I've never tackled the book - I really should do it one day. And make sure that 'Bright Eyes' is not on my reading playlist >.>

In other news, I picked up Perdido Street Station since a lot of people seem to recommend that one - I'll put it in the 'heavy and dark' pile along with House of Leaves (Which I have attempted and failed to read three times - I think I need to do a Gormenghast Trilogy with it and lock myself in a farmhouse in Southern France) and the unread Ian Banks's. I'd get on it straight away but I've been given these two dystopian YA romances and someone's very keen to know what I think... I think one of them is called Matched, the other is Demise or Dissolution or something beginning with a D. They don't sound THAT BAD, but after reading the back covers I already feel like doing a Zero Punctuation and making myself a stamp that says "It's Not The Hunger Games BUT..."

penny_dreadful
02-15-2011, 07:23 AM
Best: Watership Down

Made bunnies badass. Case closed.

You just like books that make your wife cry.

Oh, there I go again (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9czkZiO-38).

The Hag
02-15-2011, 08:22 AM
Best: Watership Down


Another book I loved but haven't read in years. That's what happens when you get old! XD

Book related quote that made my morning (via Kung Fu Monkey (http://kfmonkey.blogspot.com/2009/03/ephemera-2009-7.html))

-- There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.

supergeekgirl
02-15-2011, 09:00 AM
That's amazing. Sometimes I wonder what sort of market there would be for a Redwall-inspired cookbook. I have Winnie-the-Pooh, Star Wars, and Discworld cookbooks, so I'm guessing someone besides me would probably be interested. I would 100% write that cookbook.


It already exists. :) I've had it for years. http://www.amazon.com/Redwall-Cookbook-Companion-Books/dp/0399237917

Used a recipe from it for the wedding.

In other Brian Jacques news, I'm sure most of you saw that he died last week. I think when I'm finished rereading Harry Potter for the 24 Hours of Potter event this summer, I'm going to reread Redwall.

Flora88
02-15-2011, 09:06 AM
@penny

You just had to post that link, didn't you? *cry cry*

I assume you've seen Plague Dogs. Damn, that movie...

penny_dreadful
02-15-2011, 11:32 AM
It already exists. :) I've had it for years. http://www.amazon.com/Redwall-Cookbook-Companion-Books/dp/0399237917

Used a recipe from it for the wedding.

BLAST IT. FOILED AGAIN. But, hey-- new cookbook! Because I don't have enough, apparently!

@penny

You just had to post that link, didn't you? *cry cry*

I assume you've seen Plague Dogs. Damn, that movie...

No, never seen it. I've never even heard of it. And now I am never going to watch it, because I hate things about animals that make me cry.

Brsis
02-15-2011, 02:08 PM
You just like books that make your wife cry.

Oh, there I go again (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9czkZiO-38).

I once made an entire class full of Film Studies majors tear up with this video. Ah, the memories.

Loving the LOTR vs Atlas Shrugged quote! One of these days I will finish a Rand novel, out of sheer bloody-mindedness - I will not be beaten by a mere book, no matter how much I disagree with the politics invoked within it. I'll just, I dunno, intersperse chapters with Larkrise to Candleford, which is quite possibly the most soothing book in the whole world ever. EVER. It makes me feel like someone just wrapped me in a blanket and is petting my hair while I read it.

penny_dreadful
02-15-2011, 02:45 PM
We read Rand's Anthem when we were maybe twelve, and I remember it being not that bad, but it is comparatively short for one of her novels. Then again, I think with that one we read it more from an angle of individuality versus conformity on a personal level more than a political one. Anti-socialism was still the style, but I think we were also studying Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman at the time so they tried to tie it in to our lessons about Transcendentalist notions of individualism.

The Hag
02-17-2011, 01:48 PM
This totally made me laugh!

The Great Gatsby for NES (http://greatgatsbygame.com/)

penny_dreadful
02-17-2011, 06:23 PM
Question about Terry Pratchett on Jeopardy! NO ONE GOT IT. Disappoint, Jeopardy contestants. Disappoint. I bet you Watson would've gotten it. Stupid meatbags.

sam vimes
02-28-2011, 01:58 PM
I picked up Mark Twain's autobiography several days ago. I haven't really started it yet, but I have high hopes.

Mangochutney
02-28-2011, 02:31 PM
Best: Naked Lunch, by Burroughs. Sounds pretentious, probably, but I love how matter-of-fact it is about all kinds of WTF things and how nicely it paints a picture of the author trying to make himself a legend while you can still see little squishy half-hidden bits of him, like how in between RAR AUTOEROTIC ASPHYXIATION and RAR MORPHINE and RAR EMINENT JUNKIE SAGE he likes cats and thinks farts are funny.

Worst: yeah, I'm cliche, it was in fact Twilight.

glitter bomb
02-28-2011, 03:16 PM
as far as geek lit. goes, I was very taken with Frank Herbert's Dune. The mythology of the book had a big impact on me when I first read it, but I was also impressed with the quality of writing. Particularly how he was able to use exposition in a way that created a fatalistic, building tension. He managed to make complex political intrigue easy-to-follow without feeling like the information was spoon-fed. He also created so many compelling characters, even those that were treated to as much depth.

I didn't like the subsequent books, I felt like the writing wasn't as strong and I was kinda peeved that it ruined many of the loved, hero characters from the first book. So I pretend those don't exist and just enjoy book 1. ;)

It was fun re-watching the original Star Wars after having read Dune, because previously I hadn't realized all the obvious references and influences the book had on the film. I later read that Lucas' early Star Wars scripts had elements that were a direct rip-off of Dune and then were toned down.


the worst has to be The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, which a friend had lent me. Crap writing, racist and classist (like, at first I thought the author was a contemporary of C.S. Lewis, it was that bad). I don't know what the hell Pullman was trying to do there. I tried re-reading again when I was sick and wanted some fluff reading -- nope, still a terrible writer and still an awful book.

sam vimes
02-28-2011, 03:24 PM
the worst has to be The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, which a friend had lent me. Crap writing, racist and classist (like, at first I thought the author was a contemporary of C.S. Lewis, it was that bad). I don't know what the hell Pullman was trying to do there. I tried re-reading again when I was sick and wanted some fluff reading -- nope, still a terrible writer and still an awful book.

I liked it, especially since I picked up the series when I was in the process of quitting Catholicism. :/

And seven year old me is giving you the finger for your glancing, bracketed criticism of the Chronicles of Narnia. I treat any all the isms present in the series as forgivable, like the language of a beloved grandparent.

penny_dreadful
02-28-2011, 03:42 PM
the worst has to be The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, which a friend had lent me. Crap writing, racist and classist (like, at first I thought the author was a contemporary of C.S. Lewis, it was that bad). I don't know what the hell Pullman was trying to do there. I tried re-reading again when I was sick and wanted some fluff reading -- nope, still a terrible writer and still an awful book.

What did you find racist and classist about Pullman's writing? I haven't read the trilogy in a while, but I didn't notice it and I really haven't found any criticisms of the novels besides the atheistic agenda.

The His Dark Materials novels are some of my favorites.

glitter bomb
02-28-2011, 03:56 PM
I liked it, especially since I picked up the series when I was in the process of quitting Catholicism. :/

And seven year old me is giving you the finger for your glancing, bracketed criticism of the Chronicles of Narnia. I treat any all the isms present in the series as forgivable, like the language of a beloved grandparent.

no, I actually liked Chronicles of Narnia. :) I loved them as a kid (mostly because I missed the whole religious thing and loved the magic and talking animals). I used to have the whole collection and re-read all of them a few years ago. But re-reading them as an adult it was pretty clear that C.S. Lewis had the racist views of his time (bad people were always "dark" and "from the East") and was pretty ham-handed about the Christianity-as-metaphor. But reading those books I could shrug off much of that as being a part of the time and place of the author. Like when I watch old black-and-white movies and have to shrug off much of the racism and sexism in order to enjoy the film, due to the attitudes of the time period.

Which is why I felt The Golden Compass was such crap. It was written recently and still used language like it was written in the same period as the Narnia Chronicles. It was also frustrating that the author kept referring to the little girl heroine in derogatory terms, repeatedly stating she was like a gross animal simply because she played with the boys instead of wearing dresses and going to tea parties (I'm only loosely paraphrasing there). Like dude, seriously, she's your gifted savior character why you gotta hate? And while some of the world elements were interesting, I felt it wasn't enough to make up for all the other flaws like poor writing and storytelling. sorry. *shrugs*

glitter bomb
02-28-2011, 04:06 PM
What did you find racist and classist about Pullman's writing? I haven't read the trilogy in a while, but I didn't notice it and I really haven't found any criticisms of the novels besides the atheistic agenda.

The His Dark Materials novels are some of my favorites.
Why do I always seem to spark debate on this stuff? hee.

Mostly what I said in my response to Sam Vimes above. (trying not to write spoilers) A lot of the language was like "we wealthy white people are good and right, those dark and/or poorer people are untrustworthy and un-evolved." It was like everything was always a backhanded comment. On one hand dark poor people would be instrumental in helping, on the other hand they were frequently spoken about in derogatory terms. And not by another character, by the author. At first I thought maybe this was some kind of clever social commentary that I had missed or mis-remembered. Or maybe he was trying to create more complex characters, calling out their bad points as well as their good. Then upon re-reading I was like, nope, my initial impression was right. I just found it very weird. And the writing was too weak IMO to make all of those problems work.

Which is not to say anyone who likes the book sucks or is stupid. I just personally couldn't tolerate it. Like, I wish the basic mythology had been given to another writer to work with. ;)

edit: I do love Terry Pratchett though. :)

penny_dreadful
02-28-2011, 04:18 PM
Why do I always seem to spark debate on this stuff? hee.

LOL, it's not a debate, it's a discussion! I'm genuinely interested in different interpretations of books, even negative ones of books I like.

Again, I didn't read it like that, but it's been a while. Maybe I'll have to go in with new eyes and reevaluate it. Pullman doesn't strike me as the most noble and righteous of all people on earth, but I thought that Subtle Knife and, especially, Amber Spyglass had some absolutely transcendent passages.

Incidentally, I am re-reading The Chronicles of Narnia right now. At the moment I'm on The Silver Chair. I kind of love Puddleglum.

Rjr3412
02-28-2011, 04:20 PM
Why do I always seem to spark debate on this stuff? hee.

Mostly what I said in my response to Sam Vimes above. (trying not to write spoilers) A lot of the language was like "we wealthy white people are good and right, those dark and/or poorer people are untrustworthy and un-evolved." It was like everything was always a backhanded comment. On one hand dark poor people would be instrumental in helping, on the other hand they were frequently spoken about in derogatory terms. And not by another character, by the author. At first I thought maybe this was some kind of clever social commentary that I had missed or mis-remembered. Or maybe he was trying to create more complex characters, calling out their bad points as well as their good. Then upon re-reading I was like, nope, my initial impression was right. I just found it very weird. And the writing was too weak IMO to make all of those problems work.

Which is not to say anyone who likes the book sucks or is stupid. I just personally couldn't tolerate it. Like, I wish the basic mythology had been given to another writer to work with. ;)

edit: I do love Terry Pratchett though. :)

It's not altogether surpising that someone who enjoyed the Narnia books would dislike the Pullman books. Almost expectant really. Without giving too much plot away the Narnia Chronicles are heavily Christian and practically parables, whereas His Dark Materials is more or less focused on how organized religion is evil. Not really compatible ideas.

Terry Pratchett is great.

Best - Anything by Robert Heinlein - The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress (favorite)
Worst - Tough to tell, but the most recent Anita Blake book sucked.

Brsis
02-28-2011, 04:37 PM
mostly because I missed the whole religious thing and loved the magic and talking animals

This quote makes it look like I'm picking on you, which is not my intention, because it seems like EVERYONE who read Narnia as a child says this. EVERYONE. Neil Gaiman said so in one of his interviews, even!

I don't understand it. I finished The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe for the first time as a small child, closed the book, went "Oh, right, so Aslan's Jesus" and went on with the novels without fretting over it too much. But I NOTICED. And I was raised by a family of ambivalent pagans, and I know for a fact no-one told me this was the case. Either I'm a freak, or I was much older than the majority of people when I started reading them.

BTW, been a long while since I read His Dark Materials but your reaction surprised me... I don't remember any of that stuff, which I'm normally pretty sharp on, and the most recent time I re-read them was three years ago when I got the combined hardcover. Then again, I don't particularly want to read them again either - there were other things that bothered me. Have I mentioned Philip Pullman is weird? As in, in person, as a person, really freakin' weird?

His YA Victorian novels - Ruby in the Smoke and it's sequels - left me cold however. I'll take Soulless and Alexia Tarrabotti over those any day, and not just for the werewolf sex scenes.

penny_dreadful
02-28-2011, 04:42 PM
I didn't notice the religious references in Narnia when I was young; to be honest, I've never been especially strong on allegory. Analyzing literature was never very rewarding for me, because the teacher would be like "and in this paragraph we see that the bon bons she continually eats signify Edna's lack of sexual fulfillment," and I'd be like "WHAT IF SHE JUST WAS BIG INTO CHOCOLATE?"

Number15
02-28-2011, 04:45 PM
Best book? Well... that's a hard question. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's stone carries a huge ammount of sentimental value and it carried me away as a child.
Bluestar's Prophesy by Erin Hunter is a book that still brings me to tears and makes me laugh with all the highs and lows of it's characters.

Still, there is World War Z by Max Brooks that is easily one of the most amazing read's I've ever come across for its realism in a fictional situation. It's solid believability and variety and... LIFE is just incredible.

Best is a hard choice.. I've read these three to the point they are falling apart but they are all the best books for different reasons.

As for the worst book... it's the Great Gatsby. Hands down. No question. It's the only book in my life that I was ever unable to finish.

And I survived reading Twilight.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 05:03 PM
It's not altogether surpising that someone who enjoyed the Narnia books would dislike the Pullman books. Almost expectant really. Without giving too much plot away the Narnia Chronicles are heavily Christian and practically parables, whereas His Dark Materials is more or less focused on how organized religion is evil. Not really compatible ideas.

Terry Pratchett is great.

Best - Anything by Robert Heinlein - The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress (favorite)
Worst - Tough to tell, but the most recent Anita Blake book sucked.

Not to start a debate, but, for the record, that's...not what she was saying, really.

She was saying that she enjoyed the Chronicles of Narnia DESPITE its Christian themes, and was focusing on the classism and racism in the His Dark Materials books, which was reminiscent of Lewis's work back before racism and classism were widely recognized. His Dark Materials, she says, has none of the excuses that The Chronicles of Narnia has for being racist and/or classist.

Religion was more of a sidenote. :)

But anyway.
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo was boring.
Sorry guise.

I did recently read a delightful YA novel called The Underneath by Kathi Appelt. It was given to me as a gift.
Yes, it is a talking animal book.
But it also has Southern Gothic touches throughout, as well as an incredibly poetic style. This is, of course, to be expected as the author is a poet. But hey.
It wasn't just AMAZING, but it was better than most.

harmonyisarine
02-28-2011, 05:12 PM
Being a high fantasy (mostly) fan, the best book I've read has got to be Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (sequel comes out tomorrow!!!! ~does a happy dance~) or any number of things by Tad Williams or Orson Scott Card. I'm pretty liberal with the "favorite" term. ^_^

I didn't have a worst till I read Number15's post, and have I got to agree. The Great Gatsby near bored me to tears, I put it down halfway through and I still passed every pop quiz we had on it. No, I didn't use any summaries, I just found it that predictable and boring. A close second is High Fidelity. Not to say these are bad books, just that they are so very very not my thing at all.

Rjr3412
02-28-2011, 05:12 PM
Not to start a debate, but, for the record, that's...not what she was saying, really.

She was saying that she enjoyed the Chronicles of Narnia DESPITE its Christian themes, and was focusing on the classism and racism in the His Dark Materials books, which was reminiscent of Lewis's work back before racism and classism were widely recognized. His Dark Materials, she says, has none of the excuses that The Chronicles of Narnia has for being racist and/or classist.


Yeah, I should have phrased that better. I meant more in a general sense that the underlying themes of the two series are rather disagreeable.

Another fantastic series:
Dresden Files, by Jim Butcher <- awesomeness

glitter bomb
02-28-2011, 05:16 PM
edit: added a header here for clarity, since all the posts are responding to the same topic.
on the subject of the Chronicles of Narnia & The Golden Compass

It's not altogether surpising that someone who enjoyed the Narnia books would dislike the Pullman books. Almost expectant really. Without giving too much plot away the Narnia Chronicles are heavily Christian and practically parables, whereas His Dark Materials is more or less focused on how organized religion is evil. Not really compatible ideas.
I can see that. Though for me I enjoyed the books despite the heavy Christianity (I'm not Christian). and I don't doubt that much of my enjoyment stemmed from childhood nostalgia. ;)

This quote makes it look like I'm picking on you, which is not my intention, because it seems like EVERYONE who read Narnia as a child says this. EVERYONE. Neil Gaiman said so in one of his interviews, even!

I don't understand it. I finished The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe for the first time as a small child, closed the book, went "Oh, right, so Aslan's Jesus" and went on with the novels without fretting over it too much. But I NOTICED. And I was raised by a family of ambivalent pagans, and I know for a fact no-one told me this was the case. Either I'm a freak, or I was much older than the majority of people when I started reading them.
Sometimes I'll watch a film or read a book and I'll be so taken with the world-building (or in some cases, even the style of writing) that I'll miss some really obvious themes. Then on later viewings/readings I'll see them and go "doh!" I'm guessing that's true for many people who read Lion, Witch, Wardrobe. At the time it was like "ooh! magic animals! ooh! Snow Queen! ooh! magic closet!" I had the same issue when I saw the animated Watership Down -- I was tuned into the emotions of it, but missed the political allegory.

I also started reading at an early age, so that may have had something to do with it. Or, looking at those examples, I may just have an inherent squee! reaction to talking animals that causes me to miss everything else. ;) I friggin' loved the Babe (piggie) movies. :crylaugh:

I've never been especially strong on allegory. Analyzing literature was never very rewarding for me, because the teacher would be like "and in this paragraph we see that the bon bons she continually eats signify Edna's lack of sexual fulfillment," and I'd be like "WHAT IF SHE JUST WAS BIG INTO CHOCOLATE?"
Unfortunately I do this automatically -- with TV, films, books, everything. I have a hard time turning it off. I think it's partly from being ridiculously tuned in to pattern recognition and partly because if I enjoy material I re-watch/re-read it and try to unravel it. Though I totally appreciate the "yo! sometimes a chick just digs her some chocolate, m'kay?" Isn't there some famous French saying about that? Something like "sometimes a chair is just a chair"?

LOL, it's not a debate, it's a discussion! I'm genuinely interested in different interpretations of books, even negative ones of books I like.
hee, that's true. I do enjoy that as well. I just didn't want to be pooping on the parade or causing a ruckus.

Pullman doesn't strike me as the most noble and righteous of all people on earth, but I thought that Subtle Knife and, especially, Amber Spyglass had some absolutely transcendent passages.

Incidentally, I am re-reading The Chronicles of Narnia right now. At the moment I'm on The Silver Chair. I kind of love Puddleglum.
How funny that you're re-reading the Narnia books now. :) I haven't read those Pullman books because I stopped after Golden Compass. Unfortunately, if one book hits me poorly it usually turns me off of the author completely. Though I gave Heinlein (another post) several tries due to a friend's prodding.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 05:17 PM
I know it's old school. I know it's genre fiction.

But I love me some Dragonlance Chronicles.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 05:18 PM
Political allegory: Watership Down.

Would you believe that Adams says he had no intention of infusing the work with anything political? He insists that he was simply writing about rabbits.

I don't buy it, mister.

The Hag
02-28-2011, 05:19 PM
I'm a sucker for a good world builder. Golden Compass appealed to me in that sense. Also been a while since I've read His Dark Materials but I definitely remember thinking that the "classism" was meant to point out the hypocrisy of the Church/College and their attitude regarding the disappearance of street children and Gyptian children. World building is also JK Rowling's biggest strength, IMO. Quite honestly, I thought Harry was pretty much an unsympathetic jerk, but I loved Hogwarts and all the other wizard stuff. C.S. Lewis' utter lack of world building skills is why I only like Chronicles rather than love them. Honestly - he throws in everything including Father Christmas. Oh, and I hate The Last Battle. Susan doesn't get to be saved because now she's grown up and likes boys and stockings? Pfffft! Blow me, CSL.

Being a high fantasy (mostly) fan, the best book I've read has got to be Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (sequel comes out tomorrow!!!! ~does a happy dance~)

Oh hey! Good to know. I was enjoying Name of the Wind but when I realized that none of the story was going to get finished by the end of the book, I got really PO'd. Seriously - I hate when that happens.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 05:22 PM
I'm a sucker for a good world builder. Golden Compass appealed to me in that sense. Also been a while since I've read His Dark Materials but I definitely remember thinking that the "classism" was meant to point out the hypocrisy of the Church/College and their attitude regarding the disappearance of street children and Gyptian children. World building is also JK Rowling's biggest strength, IMO. Quite honestly, I thought Harry was pretty much an unsympathetic jerk, but I loved Hogwarts and all the other wizard stuff. C.S. Lewis' utter lack of world building skills is why I only like Chronicles rather than love them. Honestly - he throws in everything including Father Christmas. Oh, and I hate The Last Battle. Susan doesn't get to be saved because now she's grown up and likes boys and stockings? Pfffft! Blow me, CSL.

About HP:

I know, right?

Harry was actually in the bottom fourth of my top twenty favorite characters.
And let's be honest: no one reads Harry Potter strictly for the characters. Everyone reads it for the world.

Spot on, there.

Rjr3412
02-28-2011, 05:25 PM
How funny that you're re-reading the Narnia books now. :) I haven't read those Pullman books because I stopped after Golden Compass. Unfortunately, if one book hits me poorly it usually turns me off of the author completely. Though I gave Heinlein (another post) several tries due to a friend's prodding.

Did you like Heinlein at all? Which ones did you try? Stranger in a Strange Land and Starship Troopers are probably the most popular ones.

Heh, Stranger in a Strange Land, another book about a pseudo - Jesus character. Did my senior project in highschool on that book. The unabridged version is far better than the original version, fyi.

The Hag
02-28-2011, 05:26 PM
Harry was actually in the bottom fourth of my top twenty favorite characters.
And let's be honest: no one reads Harry Potter strictly for the characters. Everyone reads it for the world.

Though I do like a lot of the minor characters. I'm just not all that keen on any of the main three. And, honestly, Dumbledore was just too thick for words sometimes.

I liked some of Heinlein's early stuff. A lot of his later stuff just seemed to be an excuse to write about kinky sex. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it's just not what I necessarily look for when I want to read SciFi. And there was always a "wise older man" who just seemed a little too Gary Stu-ish.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 05:31 PM
Though I do like a lot of the minor characters. I'm just not all that keen on any of the top three.

I liked some of Heinlein's early stuff. A lot of his later stuff just seemed to be an excuse to write about kinky sex. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it's just not what I necessarily look for when I want to read SciFi. And there was always a "wise older man" who just seemed a little too Gary Stu-ish.

Neville Longbottom makes me smile. I wanted--so badly--for him to end up being far more badass than he actually ended up being.

The Hag
02-28-2011, 05:34 PM
Luna Lovegood? Made of fucking win.

glitter bomb
02-28-2011, 05:44 PM
Best - Anything by Robert Heinlein - The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress (favorite)

I haven't read that one. I'm kinda hit-or-miss with Heinlein, like some stuff I could appreciate and other stuff I just couldn't tolerate. I get his significance in the genre and I don't think he's a bad writer, but I also don't think a lot of his personal social/sexual stuff translates well into the next generation. I feel like it comes across as wishful penthouse letters instead of revolutionary by now, making much of his work too tiresome to be enjoyable for me. And I got kinda burned out on all the bugs. By my fifth story about bugs I was like, ok, enough with the bugs already. ;) I have several friends that are hardcore Heinlein fans, but I think I'm much more a William Gibson person.

edit: ack! you all are posting so fast and with such interesting stuff that I can't keep up! ;) sorry I missed your follow-up while I was writing this, but I think I addressed. I loved the first half of Stranger in a Strange Land, could barely tolerate the second. It's hard to be a feminist and roll with a writer who literally morphs his female characters into the same person, as if they're all just interchangeable service toys. ;)

Being a high fantasy (mostly) fan, the best book I've read has got to be Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (sequel comes out tomorrow!!!! ~does a happy dance~) or any number of things by Tad Williams or Orson Scott Card. I'm pretty liberal with the "favorite" term. ^_^

I didn't have a worst till I read Number15's post, and have I got to agree. The Great Gatsby near bored me to tears, I put it down halfway through and I still passed every pop quiz we had on it. No, I didn't use any summaries, I just found it that predictable and boring. A close second is High Fidelity. Not to say these are bad books, just that they are so very very not my thing at all.
I haven't read an Rothfuss, I'll have to check that out.

Re: Gatsby, that's actually one of my favs, hee. I think there are so many wonderful character portraits in that book. Then again, when it comes to literature (as opposed to genre material) I prefer character-driven work over plot-driven, so some of my favorites are books where not a lot happens. You might prefer the film version, which was surprisingly well done from what I remember and very well cast.

Not to start a debate, but, for the record, that's...not what she was saying, really.
Thanks for explaining what I said much better than I. :bigtu:

Would you believe that Adams says he had no intention of infusing the work with anything political? He insists that he was simply writing about rabbits.

I don't buy it, mister.
I don't buy it either. ;)

penny_dreadful
02-28-2011, 05:48 PM
I did recently read a delightful YA novel called The Underneath by Kathi Appelt. It was given to me as a gift.
Yes, it is a talking animal book.
But it also has Southern Gothic touches throughout, as well as an incredibly poetic style. This is, of course, to be expected as the author is a poet. But hey.
It wasn't just AMAZING, but it was better than most.

Sounds interesting; I do love me some talking animals, Southern Gothic, and poets writing prose.

On the topic of HP, I also wasn't very invested in the three main characters, but I LOOOOOOOVED both Snap and Lupin. And, er, we know how that ended. You're dead to me, Rowling. DEAD.

Nah, I'm just kidding. You're a cool lady.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 05:59 PM
Sounds interesting; I do love me some talking animals, Southern Gothic, and poets writing prose.

On the topic of HP, I also wasn't very invested in the three main characters, but I LOOOOOOOVED both Snap and Lupin. And, er, we know how that ended. You're dead to me, Rowling. DEAD.

Nah, I'm just kidding. You're a cool lady.

The Underneath is daaaark, man. But it ends happily. Worth your time.

As for Harry Potter characters, my top five favorites would have to be Snape, Neville, Luna, Draco, and Professor McGonagal. Fred and George come in sixth because they count as one person.

glitter bomb
02-28-2011, 06:04 PM
I'm a sucker for a good world builder. [snip] World building is also JK Rowling's biggest strength, IMO. Quite honestly, I thought Harry was pretty much an unsympathetic jerk, but I loved Hogwarts and all the other wizard stuff.
oh gees, I'm a big sucker for world building, too. Just had a talk about that with my bf the other day, where I was like, "I need to just admit that I'm a sucker for world-building." That's what got me into the Harry Potter books, and later the films.

C.S. Lewis' utter lack of world building skills is why I only like Chronicles rather than love them. Honestly - he throws in everything including Father Christmas. Oh, and I hate The Last Battle. Susan doesn't get to be saved because now she's grown up and likes boys and stockings? Pfffft! Blow me, CSL.
I feel you there. That falls into my "well, it's from the 50s so I have to let it slide" category. Like when I watch Gone with the Wind or It's a Wonderful Life. but yeah.

Neville Longbottom makes me smile. I wanted--so badly--for him to end up being far more badass than he actually ended up being.
Luna Lovegood? Made of fucking win.
yes, and yes! I love them both. As much as I adore Hermione, Neville and Luna are so much win. (Though I do think Rupert Grint royally rocks as Ron in the films.)

On the topic of HP, I also wasn't very invested in the three main characters, but I LOOOOOOOVED both Snap and Lupin. And, er, we know how that ended. You're dead to me, Rowling. DEAD
I feel ya there, too. Prof. Lupin, or more accurately the actor's performance in the film, is one of my favorites, I just love seeing the character. I'm still holding a grudge against Joss Whedon for what he did to Wash in Serenity -- and Firefly ended what, like 6 years ago?

penny_dreadful
02-28-2011, 06:06 PM
The Underneath is daaaark, man. But it ends happily. Worth your time.

Er, just read a little about it on Amazon, and the Bad Things Happening to Animals bits are kind of scaring me off. I have no stomach for it.

The Hag
02-28-2011, 06:11 PM
I'm much more a William Gibson person.


:bigtu: Have you read Neal Stephenson? If you like Gibson, you'd probably like his early stuff. Though I think my favorite of his is Cryptonomicon.

Re: HP minor characters. Never thought to rank them, but yeah, loved the Weasley twins, Tonks, Lupin, Snape, McGonigal, Neville. I was even pretty fond of Ginny. Enough to think that she's too good for Harry. Really - I feel like Harry just wanted to be a Weasley. Sort of like Laurie in Little Women. He was a lonely kid who wanted to be part of the March family. Jo turned him down so he married Amy instead. :/

Flora88
02-28-2011, 06:12 PM
@penny
Really, a bad thing only happens to one animal. The other animals triumph in the end.
But go with what you can stomach. :)


EDIT:

OH! Lol! I read that one person's review. You'd think that the animals lived in a concentration camp in which they were beaten every day.
Don't worry. It's not NEARLY as horrifying as this person is making it out to be.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 06:14 PM
:bigtu: Have you read Neal Stephenson? If you like Gibson, you'd probably like his early stuff. Though I think my favorite of his is Cryptonomicon.

Re: HP minor characters. Never thought to rank them, but yeah, loved the Weasley twins, Tonks, Lupin, Snape, McGonigal, Neville. I was even pretty fond of Ginny. Enough to think that she's too good for Harry. Really - I feel like Harry just wanted to be a Weasley. Sort of like Laurie in Little Women. He was a lonely kid who wanted to be part of the March family. Jo turned him down so he married Amy instead. :/

I kind of...hated Little Women. A lot. And especially Amy and Laurie. Jo was a badass, though.

glitter bomb
02-28-2011, 06:32 PM
:bigtu: Have you read Neal Stephenson? If you like Gibson, you'd probably like his early stuff. Though I think my favorite of his is Cryptonomicon.
I have read a fair amount of Stephenson, good call. I actually think Gibson is a more talented writer in terms of technique (he's great with economy of phrase and tone, while Stephenson often does not know when to edit or use an appendix), but Stephenson can be more funny and entertaining. I haven't read Cryptonomicon yet. Knowing Stephenson's proclivity for looooooooooooong exposition and history I've found the size of the book a bit daunting, honestly. ;)

and speaking of William Gibson I feel like I need to put a plug in for The Sprawl Trilogy: Neuromancer, Count Zero (my fav of the three) and Mona Lisa Overdrive. I've read them each several times and feel like each time I appreciate them more. Gibson is one of those writers that don't immediately "wow" me from the start, but successively impress me in degrees upon each re-reading. I find I'm drawn in further and appreciate the writing and details on a greater level. Like how the first time you hear a song you can be "meh" and then after a few times it's your favorite song.

Re: HP minor characters. Never thought to rank them, but yeah, loved the Weasley twins, Tonks, Lupin, Snape, McGonigal, Neville. I was even pretty fond of Ginny. Enough to think that she's too good for Harry. Really - I feel like Harry just wanted to be a Weasley. Sort of like Laurie in Little Women. He was a lonely kid who wanted to be part of the March family. Jo turned him down so he married Amy instead. :/
You win for that literary comparison. Like, a lot. :) Also, I love Ginny's strength.

sam vimes
02-28-2011, 06:43 PM
Neville Longbottom makes me smile. I wanted--so badly--for him to end up being far more badass than he actually ended up being.

Are you snorting blocks? He overcame being set on fire and chopped Nagini's fucking head clean off. That's the most metal thing in all the books!

I just want Rowling to author BADASS: Neville's Seventh Year. I would buy that harder than anyone's bought anything.

And just for the hell of it, here's my top six characters: Luna, Snape, Lupin, Ginny, FrednGeorge, and Scrimgeour.

penny_dreadful
02-28-2011, 06:53 PM
Scrimgeour.

Wat. You just like saying "Scrimgeour", don't you?

sam vimes
02-28-2011, 06:56 PM
Wat. You just like saying "Scrimgeour", don't you?

HE WAS MISUNDERSTOOD

Flora88
02-28-2011, 07:32 PM
Are you snorting blocks? He overcame being set on fire and chopped Nagini's fucking head clean off. That's the most metal thing in all the books!

I just want Rowling to author BADASS: Neville's Seventh Year. I would buy that harder than anyone's bought anything.

And just for the hell of it, here's my top six characters: Luna, Snape, Lupin, Ginny, FrednGeorge, and Scrimgeour.

Yeah, but then he just...fizzled away.

I wanted him to have more impact on the overall plot. I wanted something cool to happen with the fact that he and Harry had the same birthday and shit. :(

I demand a Neville book.

I like how you merged Fred and George into one person Lord of the Flies style.

The Hag
02-28-2011, 07:40 PM
I just want Rowling to author BADASS: Neville's Seventh Year. I would buy that harder than anyone's bought anything.


That could be the best "Harry Potter" book ever. I really hated that the seventh book was just HRH wandering more or less aimlessly around being miserable. I wanted to be at Hogwarts. I felt like I got cheated out of my senior year. ):

Flora88
02-28-2011, 07:41 PM
That could be the best "Harry Potter" book ever. I really hated that the seventh book was just HRH wandering more or less aimlessly around being miserable. I wanted to be at Hogwarts. I felt like I got cheated out of my senior year. ):

THIS! SO MUCH!

sam vimes
02-28-2011, 07:53 PM
...he and Harry had the same birthday and shit.

Actually, Neville was born on July 30th.

...Feel free to silently hate me.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 07:57 PM
Actually, Neville was born on July 30th.

...Feel free to silently hate me.

Wow, really? Really?

The book talks about Neville's birthday? Man, I gotta re-read that shit.

Okay, but I swear to God I've got you on this Harry Potter trivia question (thought up by two football players at my high school, weirdly enough.)

If you can answer this without opening the books or looking it up on the internet, you win the internet. Or...something.

Who was the gamekeeper before Hagrid?

glitter bomb
02-28-2011, 08:16 PM
re: HP gamekeeper...

ugh! I can't remember his name, but I do remember that he was "taking time off to spend with his remaining limbs." does that count for any points?

Flora88
02-28-2011, 08:23 PM
re: HP gamekeeper...

ugh! I can't remember his name, but I do remember that he was "taking time off to spend with his remaining limbs." does that count for any points?

I think it should. That's a really random obscure part of book four.

The football players who thought this question up were hilarious. They really DID like Harry Potter! Like, not in an "I'm going to pretend to like it to make fun of the geeky kids" way. They really, genuinely, f*cking LOVED Harry Potter.

sam vimes
02-28-2011, 08:47 PM
Okay, but I swear to God I've got you on this Harry Potter trivia question (thought up by two football players at my high school, weirdly enough.)

If you can answer this without opening the books or looking it up on the internet, you win the internet. Or...something.

Who was the gamekeeper before Hagrid?

My reaction:

[grasping forehead] OOOOOOOOOH! OOOOOOH! OOOOOOOOH FUCK! GOD DAMN IT! OOOOOOOOOOOOOOH! SON OF A BITCH!

You got me.

ThakYuki
02-28-2011, 09:52 PM
Wow, really? Really?

The book talks about Neville's birthday? Man, I gotta re-read that shit.

Okay, but I swear to God I've got you on this Harry Potter trivia question (thought up by two football players at my high school, weirdly enough.)

If you can answer this without opening the books or looking it up on the internet, you win the internet. Or...something.

Who was the gamekeeper before Hagrid?

Dumbledore talks about Neville's birthday at the end of book 5. (Is it sad that I know exactly which book?) As for the gamekeeper, I thought Hagrid was the first gamekeeper. :/ I could be wrong.

Edit: oooo, just went to look it up.

Flora88
02-28-2011, 10:02 PM
The answer: Apparently, it was a man by the name of Ogg.

Yep. Book four. I think Arthur mentions this guy, but I'm not sure.

ShinobiXikyu
02-28-2011, 10:39 PM
Still, there is World War Z by Max Brooks that is easily one of the most amazing read's I've ever come across for its realism in a fictional situation. It's solid believability and variety and... LIFE is just incredible.

Yes, I forgot World War Z. The bigest eye-opener book I've ever read. When I read the chapter involving people moving up to Canada/Siberia and attempting to live off the land and eventually resorting to cannibalism, I literally felt like I was going to pass out from imagining a scenario like that (having been raised in remote areas where people DID live partly off the land, of course, didn't help and if anything made me scoff over how incompetent some were at wilderness survival...).

Not to mention all it's other commentary on how we're living beyond our means, too dependent on fossil fuel, our prison system doesn't work, and people can no longer actually do things that are actual work anymore or are so out of shape that if we really DID have to run for our lives, we'd be killed in moments. I've always been a survivalist, so it certainly helps with making sure I don't forget how to live so that I'll live.

ThakYuki
03-01-2011, 12:45 AM
The answer: Apparently, it was a man by the name of Ogg.

Yep. Book four. I think Arthur mentions this guy, but I'm not sure.

The HP wiki says it was Molly that mentioned him. When she was reminiscing about the whomping willow and sneaking out with Arthur.

Brsis
03-01-2011, 03:52 AM
I just got back from work and ended up having a mad squeeing session with one of the customers over That One Creative Writing Class I did (Note; Never hire a failed writer to teach a creative writing class about getting published) and subversive/fantastical historical fiction (One: Naomi Novik and Two: Susanna Clarke. If you like Jane Austen even a teeny tiny bit, go get yourself His Majesty's Dragon/Temeraire and/or Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell) and he recommended me a series he couldn't remember the name or the author of, and I'm kind of pulling a blank.

It's a three or four volume series written some twenty or thirty years ago about WWII, and then aliens invade.

LOVEUlquiorra<3
03-03-2011, 02:13 AM
Worst: Besides Twilight, I couln't not read The Silver Chair ( Chronicles of Narnia) by C.S Lewis. It was boring for me.

B-but... Puddleglum! *flails*

Koona K.
03-04-2011, 01:50 AM
Best book I've read so far: Johannes Cabal the Necromancer <3 To the gods I love this book!

Worst: Lost (can't remember the author but they made the Wicked series) It started off pretty good but then went in a whole different direction that just put me off.

penny_dreadful
03-04-2011, 06:44 AM
Worst: Lost (can't remember the author but they made the Wicked series) It started off pretty good but then went in a whole different direction that just put me off.

I have overall really, really enjoyed Gregory Maguire's work, but Lost didn't do anything for me, either. I would definitely not say it's the worst book I've read, but it was pretty dull.

Koona K.
03-04-2011, 10:26 AM
I have overall really, really enjoyed Gregory Maguire's work, but Lost didn't do anything for me, either. I would definitely not say it's the worst book I've read, but it was pretty dull.

I only say that b/c I can't think of another that I really didn't enjoy. I know there's probably one that will hit me later but this one sticks out the most. Though I have not read the Wicked series I've heard great things about it and even went to see the play in NY (I know it's different than the book).

penny_dreadful
03-04-2011, 10:34 AM
I only say that b/c I can't think of another that I really didn't enjoy. I know there's probably one that will hit me later but this one sticks out the most. Though I have not read the Wicked series I've heard great things about it and even went to see the play in NY (I know it's different than the book).

LOL, to each their own, but if you can't manage to think of a worse book than I consider you fortunate! :thumbsup:

Wicked was good, but I found slogging through the politics a little tiresome. I did read Son of a Witch, and it was fine but not outstanding. I never got around to A Lion Among Men.

I definitely prefer Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister and Mirror, Mirror to Maguire's other works.

Koona K.
03-04-2011, 11:04 AM
I definitely prefer Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister and Mirror, Mirror to Maguire's other works.

Now those I was actually curious about. But unfortunately I'm way way behind in my book reading.

*looks at book shelf* sigh......T_T

Flora88
03-04-2011, 04:38 PM
Dude, Laurie Halse Anderson is pretty good. Speak was good, and today I read Wintergirls. That shit was crazy, but very good and more than a little trippy.

I wasn't all that impressed with Catalyst, but hey. *shrug*

Oh, and everyone--everyone--needs to read The Jolly Postman. It's a picture book, but it's ADORABLE. Like, CLEVERLY adorable.

A.F.S. 1984
03-04-2011, 11:53 PM
I like books that deal with social issues in an easy tone. Kind of like true stories overlaid with academic conjecture about what is happening. Some are:
Last Chance in Texas
A Death in Texas
The Discovery of the Asylum

I have read some books that suck and never should have been published. Some of them are:
The Bell
and ALL of Glenn Beck's books.

Flora88
03-05-2011, 12:05 AM
I have read some books that suck and never should have been published. Some of them are:
The Bell
and ALL of Glenn Beck's books.

^ Agreed.

Koona K.
03-05-2011, 12:43 AM
I have read some books that suck and never should have been published. Some of them are:
The Bell
and ALL of Glenn Beck's books.
^
Agree also.

C. Marie
03-05-2011, 12:53 AM
Having finished The Hunger Games, I can see why many people like it so much. It was extremely compelling, although I did have one minor complaint which I won't discuss because it would be a spoiler.

I am curious to see how similar it is to Battle Royale, but I liked this book on its own merits.

Brsis
03-05-2011, 04:29 AM
Having finished The Hunger Games, I can see why many people like it so much. It was extremely compelling, although I did have one minor complaint which I won't discuss because it would be a spoiler.

I am curious to see how similar it is to Battle Royale, but I liked this book on its own merits.

LOVED this trilogy so hard (And when I say I love something, it means I spent the entire last half trying to read through floods of tears. This is a theme.) - I had a few squiggles about The Hunger Games too, but they ironed them out pretty nicely in Catching Fire and Mockingjay

Re; Battle Royale - not very, but this is a primarily stylistic thing I think. The Hunger Games is visceral and emotional and digs you right into the characters, and the politics are subtle to start off with and get more prominent and more complicated (But not TOO complicated) throughout the series until they're carrying equal weight with the love story. Battle Royale - while it has that 'sparseness' that comes from being translated from Japanese - has this lean, melancholy detached quality which doesn't seem overtly political until you realise every single thing in the book IS political. The Hunger Games puts you through an emotional wringer. Battle Royale leaves you sort of numb.

Kitsune-sama
03-05-2011, 06:51 AM
best:

Sabriel by Garth Nix is a top contender, along with Exquisite Corpse by Poppy Z. Brite. I love these two so much (Maybe Watership Down by Richard Adams, We All Fall Down by Robert Cormier, Catcher in the Rye[/b] by J.D. Salinger, and the [I]Cirque du Freak books by Darren Shan. Love these books so much.

Worst:

For starters... Twilight... yep, enough said. Along with 1984 by George Orwell and The Bell Jar by Sylva Plath. That's really all I can think of. I rarely read as it is, and if I don't automatically like the book, I won't finish it.

ShinobiXikyu
03-05-2011, 09:15 PM
I liked the first half of 1984 (I stopped reading shortly after where Winston gets captured by the thought police. Wait, it is Winston, right?I haven't read it in years)...but then like usual, Orwell started on his ranting, neverending, repetitive, inconclusive essays on socialism, and after slogging through twenty pages of it, I eventually just gave up and put the damn book down because I went from interested to bored to fucking death.

Brsis
03-06-2011, 01:08 PM
... why did no one tell me the new Naomi Novik was out??? :D

Also; my friend gave me a book called Boneshaker, it looks cool - kind of steampunk? Has anyone read it?

The Seventh Sea
03-12-2011, 04:43 PM
Hm, I don't know if I have a worst book, if I didn't like it, I wouldn't go very far into it.

However, the best book I've read is really a series called the Rhiannon's Ride series by Kate Forsyth. I don't remember any other book I've been glued to before, would spend all my free time with it. Finished all three books in three months. I wish there was more.

x-Steffi-x
03-12-2011, 04:51 PM
Twilight hands down (as in worst).

cupofjasmine
03-12-2011, 05:27 PM
I LOVE The Odyssey.

Miyabi-
03-13-2011, 01:50 AM
Wicked was good, but I found slogging through the politics a little tiresome. I did read Son of a Witch, and it was fine but not outstanding. I never got around to A Lion Among Men.

I agree.."Wicked" started out soooo slowly. I almost gave up on it 1/4 of the way in. It definately got better and I'm glad I stuck it out.

...Can I have favorite authors that I've loved nearly everything they've written? I'm putting Neil Gaiman out there for Sandman, Good Omens and American Gods.
My other faves are Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman for the Dragonlance novels. (except for War of Souls trilogy..boo WoS)

Least favorites are definately the Twilight series. I sloshed my way through all four and felt that bitter sting of time lost and money spent. -_- I seriously have no idea how a teenager could like it, let alone any woman over the age of 18.
To express this feeling, my current desktop is now a pic of The Count from "Sesame Street" punching Edward Cullen in the face. It is glorious.

Origin
03-13-2011, 01:07 PM
To express this feeling, my current desktop is now a pic of The Count from "Sesame Street" punching Edward Cullen in the face. It is glorious.

^So much win TT_TT

I actually have to say I found my first C.S Lewis book I don't like. Peleandra. I've been trying to get through it but it's dull and doesn't appeal to me whatsoever.

However a personal favorite is the Darkest Evening of the Year by Dean Kootz. Very, very nice.

Anmanda
03-13-2011, 02:36 PM
I don't really have a favorite book but my favorite writer is Stephen King hands down. I don't read as much nowadays as I did a couple of years ago though, which is kinda sad... idk why.. school and everything has started to take up more time I guess :s

penny_dreadful
03-13-2011, 03:38 PM
Least favorites are definately the Twilight series. I sloshed my way through all four and felt that bitter sting of time lost and money spent. -_- I seriously have no idea how a teenager could like it, let alone any woman over the age of 18.
To express this feeling, my current desktop is now a pic of The Count from "Sesame Street" punching Edward Cullen in the face. It is glorious.

http://26.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_kz7g7gDeH11qzp9kmo1_500.jpg

Glorious, indeed.

I finished up the Chronicles of Narnia (again). I got to the last page of The Last Battle, and pretty much did this:

http://images2.fanpop.com/image/photos/13800000/Bert-reading-Twilight-harry-potter-vs-twilight-13896899-193-135.gif

Maybe I never did get around to that book years ago, because I thought I would've remembered such a WTF moment. Not that you couldn't really see it coming, but I was sitting there like, Really, CS Lewis? REALLY? DID YOU HONESTLY JUST DO THAT? What a gyp.

Miyabi-
03-13-2011, 06:18 PM
^--Yep! That be the picture in question. ^_^ It makes me smirk a little to see it.

bonniejames
07-31-2014, 05:30 AM
:) thanks for these comments...

EvilLittleKiss
07-31-2014, 08:30 PM
Best: The Paul Street Boys and The Great Gatsby.

Worst: Twilight and Into the Wild.

almiegeddon
07-31-2014, 09:45 PM
A Separate Peace is probably somewhere on my list of worst books. I had to read it in school, which automatically makes me not like it as much because I'm forced to read it, but it was just so boring. It was the only book in school where I looked up the plot online just because I couldn't stand reading one more word of it.

As to what you guys are mentioning, I agree Wicked is not for everyone. It only got exciting toward the middle and the rest of it I skimmed through just to finish but I like the premise behind it. And funny enough, I read all of Twilight in 8 hours. A classmate of mine who was a huge fan had let me borrow her copy and I didn't like it from the very first chapter so I tried to rush through it just so I could give it back asap.

I have too many books I love but they're all from the same two authors because they're the only two I actually keep up with despite the fact that all their books are almost at 1000 pages nowadays and they release multiple books within only a few months of each other

Clementine
08-01-2014, 02:01 AM
Best: The Perks Of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky.

Worst: Maximum Ride or the Twilight series.

skippingrecord
08-07-2014, 06:56 AM
Best: Divergent, Delirium, Vampire Academy, The Hunger Games, Books by John Green.

Worst: Sleeping freshman never lie.

Mangochutney
08-07-2014, 09:27 AM
Best: Creatures of Light and Darkness (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creatures_of_Light_and_Darkness) by Roger Zelazny. Couldn't recommend it more highly, it's effortless-seeming surreality and leapingly inventive.

Worst: 50 Shades of Grey. Fails in every conceivable standard of measurement, except perhaps as a physical object that exists and occupies space more or less capably.

Into the Wild.

You know it. Krakauer boned the whole goat on that one, factual inaccuracy and sloppy author insertion all over the place. I can't give it worst when there's books like 50sog floating around but lord a'mighty, it isn't good.

EvilLittleKiss
08-07-2014, 01:21 PM
You know it. Krakauer boned the whole goat on that one, factual inaccuracy and sloppy author insertion all over the place. I can't give it worst when there's books like 50sog floating around but lord a'mighty, it isn't good.

Finally, someone who understands!
(I've never read 50sog, I know it's shit though)
I had to read it for my junior year English class, and it was so incredibly annoying to read, it was like reading a Draco in Leather Pants fanfic about your least favorite character. I didn't see what was so likable about Alex.
Okay, so you have some know-it-all college student who decides to abandon his loving family and go off on an adventure into the woods, and gets killed because of stupid mistakes. And he's a hero? He's comparable to great authors? What has this guy ever done for others? (He didn't even donate his money, he burned it. At least donating would give him some credit, because that money could've helped others.)
And the movie was just ridiculous. My class laughed at so many serious parts.

TaliaRosalie
08-07-2014, 05:35 PM
I never liked "Ethan Frome" or the Twilight saga.

Best book? That's a hard one. Unwind dystology, Paranormalcy trilogy, The Giver, Gathering Blue, Messenger...

I asked my mom and she said "1984" for the worst. And like... "Once Was Not Enough" or something for the best.

Danteisagenius
08-11-2014, 04:38 PM
Worst: The Old Man and the Sea. Seriously, is it even possible to enjoy a book that is like a hundred and some pages of a guy all alone on a boat?! Fishing is boring. Reading about someone fishing? Now that's just torture!

Best: Eyeshield 21. I know it's a Manga, but it is SOOOO uplifting and inspiring! It makes me laugh, it made me [happy] cry, it didn't have any sappy romance, and it didn't have to lean on sex, drugs, or alcohol. The characters are all so lovable too. I've read this series SO many times, and it always has me (literally) laughing out loud. I think I seriously scare people sometimes when I burst out in sudden Eyeshield 21 laughter, but it feels so gooooood! L-O-V-E it! Oh, and The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray (Chris Wooding) was a great (non-manga) book.