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bodatheyoda
02-08-2011, 12:28 AM
I'm considering doing an Oni link cosplay...I am stumped on what to use to make the sword.

http://images.elfwood.com/fanq/j/o/joshawowo2/ewonilink.jpg

Any advice from anyone?

Aearon
02-08-2011, 01:04 AM
You could always make it out of wood or acrylic. It'd be crazy expensive out of acrylic though...
I'm not sure that it would be a good idea to attempt to make it out of cardboard or foam.

Eau de Decus
02-08-2011, 05:30 AM
There's two ways off the top of my head on how to go about it, depend on the tools you have available:

Make it out of wood

If you have a table saw, circular saw, or even a dremel (http://www.dremel.com/Pages/default.aspx) tool, I would go this route. I would recommend using condensed fiberboard sheets. Basically, it is condensed wood sheets that will not splinter nearly as much as other woods. If you're curious as to why FB is so amazing, trying cutting it and then cut a piece of, say, pinewood and try not to get shards in your eye. Fiberboard will be your new best friend. It's strong, very easily sanded down, though can be heavy, but since this sword is thin that should not be a problem. I would recommend getting one sheet to fit the whole sword (handle included). It should run you about $8-15 for a sheet that big at most hardware stores (such as Home Depot)

I would suggest getting around a 1/4in (0.635cm) sheet. That should be thick enough to work with and can easily be cut by even a dremel tool. Draw out the design on the board and cut it out using whichever saw you happen to have. I have a table saw, so cutting curves can be tricky, but it's entirely doable (see this here (http://www.cosplay.com/gallery/178988/p1)). That was done with a hack saw/table saw, then we smoothed the curves with a dremel and hand sanding, so your sword could go the same way. Simply do a rough cut with the saw, then smooth it out through rigorous sanding. Then all that is left is painting it.

Make it out of cardboard

If you don't have saws at your disposal, or are not comfortable working with them, then my next suggestion would be cardboard. It's easier, but probably much more time consuming. You can make the skeleton of the sword (handle included) as one piece of cardboard (just draw it out, then cut it out) or even string multiple components together and glue them together.

With the basic skeleton done, I would use wood filer (can find it at any hardware store for about $6-8 a container). You'll want to do several coats of it, so I would suggest a thin base for the initial process, then slowly layer it on each side to give it thickness and strength. You'll want to sand it down after each coat so:


Apply filer
Sand it smooth
Apply more filer
Sand it smooth
Repeat...

Once it's as thick as needed, all you have to do is paint it.

It's not a terribly difficult sword once you get going, so you shouldn't have any issues with it. If you feel I missed something, or have another question, shoot me a PM if you'd like. Best of luck! ^_^

Aearon
02-08-2011, 01:01 PM
I'd probably suggest a 1/2" thick piece instead of a 1/4" thick. This would let each piece of the blade be 1/4" thick and curve over the other.

Eau de Decus
02-08-2011, 03:33 PM
I'd probably suggest a 1/2" thick piece instead of a 1/4" thick. This would let each piece of the blade be 1/4" thick and curve over the other. Er, that's what I stated - a 1/4" sheet for each of the blades. They overlap, making it 1/2" thick in the center.>_<

bodatheyoda
02-08-2011, 04:13 PM
I didn't know if I'd be able to use a foam and then add a hardener resin of some sort to it or not..

Aearon
02-08-2011, 04:14 PM
Er, that's what I stated - a 1/4" sheet for each of the blades. They overlap, making it 1/2" thick in the center.>_<Aah. It looked like you meant a 1/4" thick sheet for the entire piece and then carving it out of that one piece. That would make the middle where each part of the blade overlaps 1/4" thick and each blade itself 1/8" thick.
I didn't think you meant doing the sword out of 2-3 pieces. Personally, I'd say a 1/2" thick sheet and carving the entire sword from one piece would be more sturdy. Making it out of more than one piece would work though. You'll have to be careful about forming the wood to get the pieces to curve over one another.

Eau de Decus
02-08-2011, 04:23 PM
I didn't think you meant doing the sword out of 2-3 pieces. Again, I didn't. One piece across the board, cut it out as a single unit, use wood filer to give the added thickness and the illusion of it being two separate blades. The only reason I suggested it be 1/2" in the center is because if each blade is "X", then the center has to be "X+X", so the center would be 1/2" thick [or insert whatever dimensions] you plan on using there.

Aearon
02-08-2011, 04:35 PM
Again, I didn't. One piece across the board, cut it out as a single unit, use wood filer to give the added thickness and the illusion of it being two separate blades.


Make it out of wood

If you have a table saw, circular saw, or even a dremel
tool, I would go this route. I would recommend using condensed fiberboard sheets. Basically, it is condensed wood sheets that will not splinter nearly as much as other woods. If you're curious as to why FB is so amazing, trying cutting it and then cut a piece of, say, pinewood and try not to get shards in your eye. Fiberboard will be your new best friend. It's strong, very easily sanded down, though can be heavy, but since this sword is thin that should not be a problem. I would recommend getting one sheet to fit the whole sword (handle included). It should run you about $8-15 for a sheet that big at most hardware stores (such as Home Depot)

I would suggest getting around a 1/4in (0.635cm) sheet. That should be thick enough to work with and can easily be cut by even a dremel tool. Draw out the design on the board and cut it out using whichever saw you happen to have. I have a table saw, so cutting curves can be tricky, but it's entirely doable (see this here). That was done with a hack saw/table saw, then we smoothed the curves with a dremel and hand sanding, so your sword could go the same way. Simply do a rough cut with the saw, then smooth it out through rigorous sanding. Then all that is left is painting it.O.oa Forgive me, but I don't see any wood filler in the above directions.
I see:
1. Rough cut out of the sword.
2. Sand sword.
3. Paint sword.

But, I'm guessing what you're meaning is this?
1. Cut out the shape of the sword.
2. Use the dremel/files/sandpaper to get a finished shape of the sword complete with curves in all the right places.
3. Add wood filler to the middle of the blade where each side 'crosses' to give it the illusion that it's more three dimensional.
4. Sand down the filler.
5. Paint the finished product.

Adding the wood filler to make it look thicker at the center would likely work. I believe carving it out of a 1/2" thick piece would likely make it more durable overall. Also, I think the handle would be easier to hold and work with if it was thicker than 1/4".
I'm not trying to discount anyone's methods or advice here. I'm simply trying to help the OP. =)

rubyredrose
02-08-2011, 10:57 PM
I'd suggest cutting the sword out of insulation foam. By piecing the spiral together out of chunks, you can get it out of a single piece, just join the pieces with toothpicks and glue. Coat the inside strip with fabric strips, then, coat the entire thing with cl paper mache strips. Then sand, coat with spackle and sand again until you are happy with the finish. Paint and seal.

RoninEclipse2G
02-10-2011, 07:30 PM
Here's how my friend Bethy makes her keyblades out of craft foam. I've seen them flex under pressure without breaking

If you go with pink insulation foam go to a craft store like Michales or Joann's and buy a jar or two (depending on the size of your sword) of hard coat Mod Podge. It's the purple lable and it also says gloss on it. When you have sanded the foam smooth apply the Mod Podge generously over it. Make sure every nook and cranny is covered and that there are no bubbles. It looks like elemers glue but dries clear. It will take four weeks to cure, but trust me it's worth it. After it cures, paint the sword and apply another coat. This time make sure it is thin so there are no left over white spots. You can experiment with scrap foam and the paint you choose to make sure the Mod Podge will look allright. You'll have to let it cure again, but it makes the foam flexible and less likely to snap. I took a test peice about 47in. long and Mod Podged it for four weeks, then bent it to see it's limit. I was able to get a nice arch out of it and it didn't snap, just showed a few stress marks. If you put a wodden dowel through the middle like Noga suggested it will be twice as sturdy and may hold up to a sword fight. I've used this method on the four keyblades I made for NDK this year and had no trouble with them at con.