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SantuariosYue
03-10-2011, 12:06 PM
I'm going to be making a corset for a friend of mine, who has a waist of 33 in, a hip of 36, and a bust of 36 in. I've looked at corset measurements in patterns online so I know what to buy, but all the patterns I've looked at, Laughing Moon, Mantua Maker, ect, say the size she is is an 18.

My problem is: She's a very thin person, and I'm trying to understand if I made a mistake taking the measurements, or the corset patterns are run on a different scale then normal patterns. Also, the patterns will usually have a waist of 33, but usually a bust and hip of about 42-46, respectively. What should I do about this? Should I determine by one measurement, or another?

Mehdia
03-10-2011, 12:39 PM
Patterns don't run according to sizes you are used to seeing in stores. So you go by measurements. If she fits into different ones for her bust, waist, and hips, then you can cut by each, blending your line from one to another across the cutting lines. Like if her bust is an 18, cut on that until you hit where her waist would be the next size, slowly angling in or out to fit. Does that make any sense?

Brsis
03-10-2011, 01:59 PM
GO BY THE MEASUREMENTS.

I'm a TWIG - I usually wear a UK 6/8, which I think is a US 4/6 - and I wear a 12 in Laughing Moon corset patterns and a 14 in anything I have to get over my hips. They Do Not Correspond.

Re; not a perfect hourglass figure I.E. the same problem every single human being has with corset patterns, here is what I do when I'm adjusting a new pattern;
- trace off the pattern pieces, drawing the outlines of both or all three sizes that the measurements correspond to.
- mark the waist, bust and hip line
- mark the correct sizes for each of those three measurements (bust, waist and hips) and sketch smooth lines between them. Label the pieces and cut them out
- MAKE A TOILE AND ADJUST LIKE YOU HAVE NEVER ADJUSTED BEFORE UNTIL IT FITS LIKE A GLOVE
- If you're not overly concerned about a perfect perfect fit - say, you're making a fashion corset rather than a waist-trainer - trace these adjustments off onto the pattern you just used and work from this.

OR

- You keep going. Start again from the beginning, and this time use the adjustments from your toile to make a new pattern up from the original
- MAKE ANOTHER TOILE AND ADJUST LIKE YOU HAVE NEVER ADJUSTED BEFORE EXCEPT FOR THE LAST TIME YOU DID THIS
- Rinse and repeat. Three or four toiles is not unusual. Nine is, but I've done it.

Rayonea
03-10-2011, 07:42 PM
Thirding the "go by the measurements" sentiment. Also: Everything Brsis said.

From experience with the Laughing Moon patterns (the Silverado and the Dore), I would suggest cutting based on her hip/bust measurements, if you go with that company. I've found that their waist isn't actually as small as it's listed, and others have also mentioned getting less waist reduction than expected with the Laughing Moon patterns.

Try a toile first, though. You may still need to let the waist out a bit.

SantuariosYue
03-11-2011, 02:10 PM
That clears up everything! I just started feeling like I knew nothing about corsets (I know how to spell the word!) so this is very, very, very helpful! Thank you!

Satine
03-13-2011, 07:31 AM
Do check your measurents again, I happen to be very very curvy myself (small waist big hips and a ribcage that is like a barrel) so use original corset patterns as they are rather than modern.

But yes use the hip and bust as you can start by adding extra fabric at the waist and pinching it back out- those patterns are recommended so much for a reason :)

Something to remember about the original corsets- they do have a little optical illusioning going for them. The waist is more compressable than hips and bust. What is displaced at the waist needs to go somewhere else. That somewhere else is either above or below the waist. So the bust and hips are a little larger than actual measurements and the waist a little under (or a lot under depending.) If there is nothing to displace, then that was padded up artificially ;)