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tfcreate
07-07-2011, 01:55 AM
As daunting as it may seem, getting your photo taken at a con is not a really big thing.
An experienced photographer will usually help you with body position, how to stand and for the most part basic modeling, but there are a few other basics to remember:

1. Attitude shows- if you ARE nervous, distracted, anxious, rushed or otherwise "not in the moment," it will show.

If you don't have time for a few photos then decline. If you don't feel that you are prepared for a photo but still want to have one taken, ask the photographer for a few moments to get composed. Don't worry, they'll wait, or ask to meet later.

2. Don't be afraid to offer suggestions- You'll likely know more about the character than the photographer, so you will know the look of that character and it's signature poses.
This type of photography is as much about cooperation as it is about cosplay.

3. Know your limits- Before you even go to the con, know what you are willing to do and what you can do.

Don't allow yourself to be pressured into any photo, photoshoot or actions you are uncomfortable doing. This is one of the few things that there should be no compromises.

And if you feel that your cosplay can't handle action shots, then don't do it.
I've seem more than one instance where a costume literally came apart while trying to re-create a combat move or even just running.

Dom Bower recently did a very good video of a first-time model. While it's not strictly a tutorial, it shows how a professional handles himself while working with a novice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7rwDox2-LY&feature=feedlik

I'll probably add to this when I'm not as tired.

TFC

saya_blood_quee
09-26-2011, 03:07 PM
Cool thanks ^.^

ChibiOrochimaru
09-28-2011, 01:07 AM
This is real beautiful actually, no matter how much experience you have its always good to read over your basics once in awhile. There always helpful.

Seority
09-28-2011, 09:39 AM
I've never been confident enough to get my photos at a con, this makes it a lot less scary.
Thanks for the tips!

ashe2kawaii
09-28-2011, 11:11 AM
The video really helpd give me more ideas on what i could. Though i usually also look at other cosplayers and get ideas from them too

Stina006
09-30-2011, 08:15 PM
I find it's easier to pose if the character has a 'staple pose' for everything

tfcreate
11-09-2011, 10:04 PM
In spite of the moronic platitudes and inane babble, this is a useful video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOgI4lJj4vs&feature=feedu

PrincessChrista
01-09-2012, 05:12 AM
o_o
Thank you for posting this <3

CosplayJelly
02-19-2012, 08:32 PM
i find it hard to understand what it looks like from the camera's angle, so i end up either looking too high up, my legs look awkward or my torso looks wider. i know the 3/4 angle thing helps but i cant be doing that all the time can i?

Sorasflame
03-21-2012, 06:57 AM
I always practise my poses 2 weeks before the convention and they look great in front of the mirror, but as soon as I'm at the con and people ask for my picture, I:
- forget all the poses and just stand there boringly
- get very nervous and yes, it does show in the pictures :(
What can I do about this nervousness, I know it's not a big deal and I try to tell myself that, but at the con itself I get so so nervous during picture takings, I just forget it all :(

Ashurachan
03-21-2012, 09:09 AM
Problem with mirrors : once you don't have them anymore, you can't see what you look like, and thus don't know what to correct to look your best.
If you can, practice in front of a camera, have somone take your picture and see what it looks like, try to correct it, and so on. In that way, you will learn how the pose feels in your whole body.
Also, having someone take pictures of you for practice will get you used to having your photo taken. Almost all cosplayers I know started awkward, and gradually got used to cameras pointed at them. In order to feel relaxed and give your best in front of a camera, you need both self-confidence, and trust in the photographer. Both build up as you get more practice.

tfcreate
03-24-2012, 01:35 AM
I always practise my poses 2 weeks before the convention and they look great in front of the mirror, but as soon as I'm at the con and people ask for my picture, I:
- forget all the poses and just stand there boringly
- get very nervous and yes, it does show in the pictures :(
What can I do about this nervousness, I know it's not a big deal and I try to tell myself that, but at the con itself I get so so nervous during picture takings, I just forget it all :(

Think of the funniest thing you can remember.
Think of a cat with human feet. Imagine what that would look like.
Think of what would happen if elephants could fly and were carnivores.
Funny things help us to relax. Even dance around a bit. That helps to shake out the nerves.
Practice helps too.

And an experienced photographer will help you with your poses.

tfcreate
04-26-2012, 10:23 PM
If you want to drive a photographer crazy, do this to him/her....
http://youtu.be/niyTIbiV19A

:hafha:

Neelh
05-13-2012, 03:55 AM
If you want to drive a photographer crazy, do this to him/her....
http://youtu.be/niyTIbiV19A

:hafha:

XD I know now!

tfcreate
05-22-2012, 07:00 PM
Pay attention GUYS!
http://youtu.be/7r9e-qo76IA

Vault21
09-06-2012, 10:53 PM
Pay attention GUYS!
http://youtu.be/7r9e-qo76IA

Reviving a half-dead thread, but...

So, is there a good way to pose a guy with him smiling? Both of my cosplays so far have been very happy/excitable characters.

tfcreate
09-13-2012, 02:16 AM
Ok. What do you need to be able to pose well?
PRACTICE!

If you want to avoid a smile that looks practiced or phony, then go for a real one.
Do or say something funny to get you going.

nathancarter
09-13-2012, 09:18 AM
i find it hard to understand what it looks like from the camera's angle, so i end up either looking too high up, my legs look awkward or my torso looks wider. i know the 3/4 angle thing helps but i cant be doing that all the time can i?

Sorry for the long post, I wanted to address this point.

This effect is called perspective distortion (not to be confused with lens distortion), and is solely an effect of the distance between the camera and the subject. If the camera is close to the subject, perspective distortion will be exaggerated; if the camera is far from the subject, perspective distortion will be minimized.

Perspective distortion is often misunderstood as lens distortion. Bear with me here, and let's use a full-length body shot as an example.
- With an ultra-wide-angle lens, the photographer can stand only a few feet away from the subject and include the full body in the shot.
- With a medium-length lens (let's say 50mm), the photographer can stand a couple yards away and get a full-length shot.
- With a telephoto lens, the photographer must stand several yards away to get a full-body shot.

With the wide-angle lens, perspective distortion will be magnified because the camera is so close to the model - or, more accurately, because the camera is very close to one end of the model and far away from the other end.
- If the photographer is shooting from head height, the model's head will be a foot away from the camera, and the model's feet will be six feet away from the camera. This means you're going to appear in the shot with a big ol' melon up top and little teeny tiny feet at the bottom.
- If the photographer is shooting from down low, your feet and legs will look big and your head will look small - because your feet are so much closer to the camera.
- If the photographer is shooting with a wide-angle from waist height (kneeling), your head and feet will look kinda small but your thighs and hips will look disproportionately large. :( In my opinion, this is the worst when it's a moderately wide-angle lens at a few feet of distance - it's just enough distortion to make the model look pudgy around the thighs, but not quite enough distortion for the viewer to recognize that it's just the perspective effect.

If you're careful, and you have room and time to pose, the experienced photographer and model can work together to use perspective distortion to an advantage, for dramatic and fun photos. Unfortunately, most convention environments (crowded con halls, etc) don't give a lot flexibility, and when the photographer doesn't have room to work, it results in undesired and unflattering perspective distortion - fat thighs, big noggin, misshapen limbs.

If you have room and time to work, and you want to minimize unwanted perspective distortion, the photographer should stand back several yards and zoom in to achieve the desired framing.

When I get home and have access to some of my other shots, I'll post a couple of examples of using perspective distortion to one's advantage. A good example is when you have a prop weapon or gun, you can point it at the side of the camera or the photographer's shoulder or chest - not right at the lens - and the tip of the sword or gun will look large and imposing, which is a fun effect. Or, if you're a "cute" character, lean in just a bit, give an exaggerated wink and the two-fingers "V," with your hand close to the camera - again, with hand slightly to the side so you don't obstruct the whole shot with your hand. Your V-hand will look cartoony and huge which can be a fun effect if done right.

Hope this helps someone get some better portraits.


Update: Here are a few where I intentionally used perspective distortion to try for an interesting portrait.

This one is the 24-70mm lens at 34mm, shot from only a few feet away from the subject:
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8035/7941705966_390f938112_c.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathancarter/7941705966/)
DragonCon_20120831_2633.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathancarter/7941705966/) by nathancarter (http://www.flickr.com/people/nathancarter/), on Flickr

This one is my fully-manual 14mm lens, just a few inches away form the tip of the sword. It's a little out of focus, I had to manually focus and I bungled it - and at this distance to the subject, there's very little room for focus error. (note, the EXIF says 50mm because that was the lens I had on before, and this 14mm lens has no electronics to tell the camera anything different.) Still, it shows off the interesting effect of the perspective distortion.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7254/7532493294_4ee5027078_c.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathancarter/7532493294/)
Moxie.20120618.0451-Edit.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathancarter/7532493294/) by nathancarter (http://www.flickr.com/people/nathancarter/), on Flickr

This one is also with the 14mm, carefully trying for a dramatic portrait. This shot makes her nose look much bigger than it really is, because her nose is so much closer to the camera than the rest of her face.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7121/7417947614_e5c6cba3d9_c.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathancarter/7417947614/)
Circus.20120618.0747.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathancarter/7417947614/) by nathancarter (http://www.flickr.com/people/nathancarter/), on Flickr


aaaand for good measure, here's one where perspective distortion worked against me. There wasn't much I could do about it, this was in the super-crowded Marriott at Dragon*Con and I had zero room to step back, so I shot from about five feet away at 24mm. Stretched heads, misshapen limbs, pudgy midsections - yikes! It's a keeper only for the purposes of remembering the costumes and the moment; as a photograph it's.. well, it's not what I would call "good."
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8033/7966862288_29f6b57e9a_c.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathancarter/7966862288/)
DragonCon_20120831_2481.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathancarter/7966862288/) by nathancarter (http://www.flickr.com/people/nathancarter/), on Flickr

CosplayJelly
09-17-2012, 01:49 PM
oh wow thanks. thats..a lot. you explained that brilliantly!

ZeroCherryBloss
07-17-2013, 06:50 PM
Thanks for posting =]

Septi
07-22-2013, 04:21 AM
Ah very informative for a photographer and a cosplayer. Thanks! :D