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WARPAINTandUnicorns
11-10-2011, 11:38 AM
Most of the time I only see drab/muted colours used in most steampunk costumes, giving it a more grunge look to the items (dirty industrial). I have yet to see neon colours used (RAVE).

I'm my case I would like to use a richer colour palette with blue, teals and golds but I'm wondering if that is stretching it.

Mangochutney
11-10-2011, 11:50 AM
Brown is oddly one of the least steampunk colors there is. The Victorians invented FUCKOFF BRIGHT aniline dyes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauveine) and you'd better believe everybody who could was wearing them, often in combinations that would seem psychedelic to a 21st-century eye. Bright colors were new! and scientific! and as far as I'm concerned if you don't have something to break up those drab earth tones you're probably a peasant. I mean, sure, maybe you are a peasant. But you don't have to be. :)

Neon was a much later invention and looks so 80s to me I'd have a hard time figuring out how to use it, but that doesn't have to be a problem for you either. I'd love to see somebody finally make it work for them.

Mehdia
11-10-2011, 12:46 PM
Brown is oddly one of the least steampunk colors there is. The Victorians invented FUCKOFF BRIGHT aniline dyes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauveine) and you'd better believe everybody who could was wearing them, often in combinations that would seem psychedelic to a 21st-century eye. Bright colors were new! and scientific! and as far as I'm concerned if you don't have something to break up those drab earth tones you're probably a peasant. I mean, sure, maybe you are a peasant. But you don't have to be. :)

Neon was a much later invention and looks so 80s to me I'd have a hard time figuring out how to use it, but that doesn't have to be a problem for you either. I'd love to see somebody finally make it work for them.

First off, that bolded line made me fucking crack up.

Secondly, I totally agree with everything you said. The Victorians loved them some color...to the point they might have looked like a rainbow threw up on them. I like the idea of introducing color into steampunk costumes. I know I myself have been guilty of using drabber colors, but I have some steampunk costumes planned that will be very brightly colored indeed (they exist only in artwork form at the moment sadly).

Neons would be tricky to incorporate, but if someone can pull it off, more power to them!

BlondieSundae
11-10-2011, 12:48 PM
Someone told me to do my Alice steampunk in brown....

Screw that idea, I'm sticking with Alice's signature blue =P (but I'll throw in cream and a beigey tan color to make it a bit richer)

Neko.Oni
11-10-2011, 03:40 PM
Brown is oddly one of the least steampunk colors there is. The Victorians invented FUCKOFF BRIGHT aniline dyes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauveine) and you'd better believe everybody who could was wearing them, often in combinations that would seem psychedelic to a 21st-century eye.

Literature =/= reality. This is why everything was black/white/brown with an occasional tiny flash of red. Also a lot of literature focused on stuck-up aristocrats who probably felt it inappropriate to be that flamboyant... (It's the same as how Ninja are portrayed - back in Edo (?) japan they did NOT wear black bodysuits... they wore normal everyday clothes... but that's not 'special' enough for tv/movies/theater...)

I'd kinda like to see a 'psychedelic' steampunk mad scientist... would certainly be a refreshing break from the back/white/brown normally seen...

novaraven1
11-10-2011, 08:06 PM
My group has yet to make a brown/tan steampunk. We always choose a base colour, usually a jewel tone, and go from there.

But I do admit I myself am partial to grey velvets and brocades, I often pair them with bugundy or navy blue accents. It's what I look good in and I have the "If I were in Victorain England as myself, what would I want to wear" And I go flipping through my clothing catalogs and pick a dress style and shove some steamy bling on it once it's made. ^^;

My sister loves more pink tones like bright raspberry and light sky blues paired with greys to match her eyes. She's yet to try tea dying, all her blouses and ruffles are actually white and give a very futuristic/clean pressed military look when paired with all the buttons and gears and things.

Men I can see being more drab in their colour choices unless they're doing an aristocrat/dandy sort of character. But a little splash of colour here or there never hurt anyone, especially in lining colours, cravats and hat bands. Just pick one colour and have hints of it throughout to get a unified look.

Mehdia
11-10-2011, 08:46 PM
But a little splash of colour here or there never hurt anyone, especially in lining colours, cravats and hat bands. Just pick one colour and have hints of it throughout to get a unified look.

I agree with picking a single color or shade and using it as part of the costume. I wouldn't mix too many colors, but one or two in the same color family can be great.

WARPAINTandUnicorns
11-11-2011, 09:54 AM
For me the gold is for ascents the shade I'm going with is blue shot green silk. ^___^ Also a peacock brocades bodice. I'm very much in the planning stages as I won't start this costume till January 2013.

Shine-Chan
11-11-2011, 07:30 PM
I like to use a lot of sari fabric in my costuming and it works wonderfully for steampunk. In fact my whole set for teslacon is is shades of neon green and black.

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/3025584/
The lapels here
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2226153/
Neon blue anyone?
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2226154/
And props in color
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2996430/

Neko.Oni
11-12-2011, 02:35 AM
And props in color
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2996430/

What... the...??? Little info/background on this, it's so... different! (in a good way^__^)

Shine-Chan
11-12-2011, 01:41 PM
What... the...??? Little info/background on this, it's so... different! (in a good way^__^)

I got this top hat that was too big and wanted to make it fit and it turned in to this. I have a love of squids in general so it was a perfect match. Here is a tutorial of what I did to make it more or less.
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,12026.0.html

Neko.Oni
11-12-2011, 03:42 PM
I got this top hat that was too big and wanted to make it fit and it turned in to this. I have a love of squids in general so it was a perfect match. Here is a tutorial of what I did to make it more or less.
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,12026.0.html

THIS is what I love about steampunk, it's so very impractical and crazy, but also so very awesome! I wonder if you could put some small (fake) fish in there and somehow make them swim around...

Lightning Baron
11-13-2011, 07:55 PM
I think the colour choices used by steam punk cosplayers is due to their interpretation of steam punk as well as the culture. I remember attending a steam punk panel and one panelist Talked about how in the United states Steam Punk has a very wild west flavour while here in Canada we have a more Victorian/"upper class" flavour to steam punk. Also many people chose the dark colours cause and a world were fuels like coal,wood and oils/desiel are used to produce energy and to make steam, it can be very dirty and bright colours tend to be subdued and Dark colours hide the dirt.

WARPAINTandUnicorns
11-17-2011, 09:43 AM
I'm very much have a love of Victorian fashion and story setting so that's part of the reason why I'm drawn to that style.

Ororo Monroe
11-17-2011, 10:55 AM
I think the colour choices used by steam punk cosplayers is due to their interpretation of steam punk as well as the culture. I remember attending a steam punk panel and one panelist Talked about how in the United states Steam Punk has a very wild west flavour while here in Canada we have a more Victorian/"upper class" flavour to steam punk. Also many people chose the dark colours cause and a world were fuels like coal,wood and oils/desiel are used to produce energy and to make steam, it can be very dirty and bright colours tend to be subdued and Dark colours hide the dirt.

I could buy this. The style is greatly effected by what is already out there. People see the outfits and want to look like that but just a little different. I've seen that in ren-fair, roman, WW 2, and Civil War Reenacting. Like in life, trends come and go in these hobbies and probably will in Steam Punk too.

http://www.reproductionfabrics.com/
Here is a great site for fabric or getting ideas for fabric.

Fashion: A History from the 18th Century to the 20th Century, Collection from the Kyoto Costume Institute is a wonderful book for color pictures. I love the Worth stuff. There is more I could say, but I don't have the time. Just remember no one knows everything. I once made a ballgown for a woman. She bought this bright fucha fabric and I kept thinking that it was not at all period correct. Turns out that for 1960 it was the height of fashion having just been introduced.

ambientvoid
11-21-2011, 04:22 PM
Im glad I found this thread, it makes me feel better about my planned outfit for next year. Iv liked steampunk and cyberpunk pretty much equally ever since I discovered them and iv always considered them to be different eras in the same alternative history so I want to make an outfit incorporating both. I cant guarantee it'll work out perfectly but hopefully I wont be stoned for trying to blend neons and steam valves... ^^

Atton_Wonder
11-22-2011, 11:10 PM
Most of the steampunk I've seen had a very wild-west feel to it. Lot's of shades of brown and so on. Working-class garb sort of stuff. I suppose we have a lot of influence from wild-west, swash-buckling, "I'm the hero of this story! I DON'T LISTEN TO YOUR FASHION LAWS, VICTORIAN ERA!!" sort of thing. But, I've have seen, through extenstively difficult googling, the occasional brightly-coloured steampunk cosplay. I think it may also be because it's so much easier to make piratey/wild-westy stuff look steampunk, as opposed to aristocratic clothing. After all, wouldn't it be the engineers and the sailors and cowboys that have all the interesting things happen to them?

Ororo Monroe
11-23-2011, 10:12 AM
I think the brown and working class wild west thing is mostly from movies. From what I've seen of Museum pieces (county, national, and international) the Victorians liked their color. They may only get a new suit of clothes once twice a year, it may be simple cut and made of rough cloth but it was colorfull. Suits rarely where all one color and where only starting to come in shades of black, brown, and blue. Green came from arsenic, indigo from plants (thank you Ms. Pickney), ocher from minerals, madder from plants, Mauve and others from Aniline.

supergeekgirl
11-23-2011, 01:53 PM
Oooh, this is one of my steampunk peeves, this ridiculous notion that it all must be brown and brass. All you have to do is watch one of the color episodes of The Wild Wild West to know that bright colors can make beautiful steampunk costumes. Here's mine in green and purple: http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2433716/

And another costume of awesome green steampunkery: https://costume.pixi.me/main.php?g2_itemId=52557

Sadly, there are not enough colorful steampunk outfits, definitely not enough if compared to the percentage of bright colors used in the times we're trying to emulate. So please, please go out there and show the world it's okay to move away from the safety of black and brown.

EDIT: Seeing Shine's post... it's almost as if the "brightly colored steampunk" thing were emanating from Archon. :)

Shine-Chan
11-24-2011, 09:08 PM
Look at the pics from teslacon there was a rainbow of technicolor steampunks there. I was in green and black all weekend and it was awesome. The midwest is full of bright steam.

TheFontBandit
11-29-2011, 04:36 PM
If you Google "Nerfpunk", you'll find a fun group of bright, neon-colored steampunky cosplayers. I saw one of them at Dragon*Con last year... Nerf/steampunk mashup, very entertaining! It may not be historically accurate, but it put a smile on my face. :)

Leadmill
12-01-2011, 03:58 PM
The main colour of my signature steampunk project was bright red. It really looked quite striking among the more muted colours that are quite popular.

Funhouse
01-30-2012, 02:32 PM
I was told the same thing really, stick with darker colors like browns and stuff.
Now I don't feel bad using blue the next time I want to make a steampunk outfit, haha.

Somethingducky
01-30-2012, 05:04 PM
One if my favorite examples of using color in steampunk type fashion came from a certain corset designer/seamstress here (http://www.scoundrelleskeep.com/gallery/). I've linked her gallery, tons of pictures. Yes, she has lots of the usual earth tone colors but also lots of rich purples, peacock blues, absinth greens, orange and red tones. I think the key is in using the right fabrics and tones, go for heavier velvets and brocades (look through some of the upholstery fabrics) and instead of neon try more of a rich, color saturated jewel tone and carry that throughout your outfit. I've gotten a lot of inspiration looking through this website in particular.

WARPAINTandUnicorns
02-09-2012, 10:35 AM
One of these fabric is going to be the main shade of my Victorian Steampunk dress with gold accents and feathers from black, gold green and blue.
http://www.bangkokthaisilk.com/servlet/the-374/Sea-Green-Shot-Blue/Detail
http://www.bangkokthaisilk.com/servlet/the-248/Emerald-Green-Shot-Blue/Detail

To offset the shades in the dress I'm thinking of buying a black wig for it, as I was planning to use my real hair original in a bun but I think the red in my auburn hair might clash.

Ororo Monroe
02-09-2012, 01:36 PM
One of these fabric is going to be the main shade of my Victorian Steampunk dress with gold accents and feathers from black, gold green and blue.
http://www.bangkokthaisilk.com/servlet/the-374/Sea-Green-Shot-Blue/Detail
http://www.bangkokthaisilk.com/servlet/the-248/Emerald-Green-Shot-Blue/Detail

To offset the shades int he dress I'm thinking of buying a black wig for it, as I was planning to use my real hair original in a bun but i think the red in my auburn hair might clash.

I like the first for two reasons. 1) I like blue. 2) I could see it with auburn hair or even black inserts and auburn hair. (alot of Victorian hairstyles used hair pieces)

novaraven1
04-25-2012, 07:18 PM
I think the main reason people are using the safe brown palette is because they don't want to put so much work into their sewing or actually try to afford commissioned victorian styled pieces. It's just far easier and cheaper to go to the thrift store, buy something brown, and add gears to it. Stick some goggles on your head and suddenly you're part of a mercenary air ship crew with your own interesting back story to justify your costume pieces.

To me this is the essence of hallcosplay. Being a fan of a genre and wanting to join in with the other fans and get out there and have fun. You show what you like by what you choose to wear. It's an entirely valid reason for making yourself a steampunk outfit so you can fit in and many people do feel they have to play it safe and take the plainer route, especially when they are first starting out.

And then there are costumers who are in it for the challenge and the fashion and the hobby of making the actual outfits themselves. And we look at the boring brown thrift store hallcosplays and just have to sigh and shake our heads because to us it's not victorian, it's not even really steampunk, it's just steampunk fandom, like someone wearing a homestuck t-shirt instead of painting themselves all the way gray.

I'm not sure there really is a way to convince the fandom hallcosplay for fun types to get into colour. I think it's flawed media perception at this point and how the brown palette is outnumbering the brighter coloured outfits simply because the unskilled masses outnumber those with original and better researched/funded/skilled ideas. The more you see brown outfits on a google search the more that becomes what steampunk is to the ordinary person. It definitely seems like a loosing battle and eventually the more historically accurate and brightly coloured ones will be the ones who are 'doing it wrong'.

vortex
05-15-2012, 03:41 PM
Actually, I think the reason people always imagine Victorians in brown is because photos from that era were all in sepia. When you look at a Victorian picture you see everyone in brown weather they were in blue, green or red. It's a common misconception.

It's like the Frankenstein monster. The mask in the first movie was actually of a fleshy color but there was a green filter on this part of the black and white movie so people thought it was green and we still see it green today.

I find what Lightning Baron says about the difference between steampunk looks in the US and Canada very interesting. I never realized that but I think it's true. Around here, (Montreal and Ottawa in eastern Canada) a great number of steampunks are of the aristocratic style. We do have our wild west people but they are less frequent. The one time I saw many (and it was not over 25%) was actually in Toronto, a bit further to the south.

And that makes perfect sense. The west is an important part of American history and folklore. While at that time, Canada was much more attached to England so we associate it with the aristocratic British style.

I would be curious to know how those tendencies are represented in the Canadian west, especially in the prairies.

Ororo Monroe
05-16-2012, 08:43 PM
If you go off old pictures etc. Then wouldn't many steampunk costumes be black? Queen Victoria did make morning fashionable after all. But I guess I see things that why because I come at Steampunk from a historical background...

AmmieBug
05-20-2012, 01:03 PM
I have recently gotten into steampunk fashion, and have been putting together a steampunk version of a mad hatter. Burgandy and gold are the main colours along with rose and some light brown. Browns are ok as long as its not the main colour in my opinoin.

vampricyoda
06-04-2012, 09:40 PM
I personally play with reds and browns. I do "get" that bright colors are completely fine I personally prefer the muted colors because, well, I'm not going for any sort of historical accuracy. I generally do the whole thift store run for the base of the outfit and then add/create details as I find them at other shows/cons.

I enjoy the idea of having to explain off the medals I have or any other details if asked. If you want to use neon. . .it's doable. I mean I used glowsticks in a water gun to give a gun a more "Mad Science" sort of look. so maybe that could work for you?

Mikuxaz
06-21-2012, 01:02 PM
I wear whatever color I want when I do steampunk. One of my steampunk personas is a mechanic, so she wears more muted colors, but if I had an aristocratic character I'd be wearing bright colors! I work at a costume shop, and I've put together some absolutely gorgeous PINK PINK PINK!!!! themed steampunk outfits.

I will say, however, that if you wear a lot of neon orange/yellow, you'll look more like Nerfpunk than steampunk. But that's my personal opinion. XD

rosie44442003
06-21-2012, 01:15 PM
I used a teal accented wih like a silvery pink for my corset and it turned out beautifully. I wouldn't use neons but I think color is fine.

Celiaskyleaf
06-21-2012, 08:41 PM
I am planning a Steampunk outfit that will be mostly Pink with either black or purple as the other colors or both. I am doing this for a special project that I hope will be up and running soon called Cosplay for Cancer.

Volnixshin
06-21-2012, 11:02 PM
I get tired of browns and grays

Mehdia
06-22-2012, 02:07 AM
I get tired of browns and grays

OMG, I have to agree! I see more brown and red than anything. And while I myself and guilty of using those colors, I do like to use other colors as well.

the.footpad
06-22-2012, 05:58 PM
i use lots of red, black, white, blue, and brown with my steam punk vests. the leather jacket that i wear with all of my steam punk stuff is completely black with brown antique stains. right now im working on sewing a steam punk patriotic vampire tail coat. its going to be stained with coffee, but right now it is red, white, and blue.

Ororo Monroe
06-25-2012, 07:54 PM
i use lots of red, black, white, blue, and brown with my steam punk vests. the leather jacket that i wear with all of my steam punk stuff is completely black with brown antique stains. right now im working on sewing a steam punk patriotic vampire tail coat. its going to be stained with coffee, but right now it is red, white, and blue.

"Patriotic Vampire" what the Smeg is that?

WARPAINTandUnicorns
06-28-2012, 03:08 PM
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Vamp maybe. ;)

the.footpad
06-28-2012, 06:49 PM
"Patriotic Vampire" what the Smeg is that?

it was a concept i came up with on my own. it was about this monster hunter type guy who was looked up at by his country (America) and so a group of vampires got really ticked off at him for killing their family and they turned him into a vampire. now that he's a vampire, he wants revenge from those who turned him into one. really, the only reason i called it a "patriotic" vampire is because the under vest i made for it had a really old looking red, white, and blue pattern on it.

the.footpad
06-28-2012, 06:50 PM
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Vamp maybe. ;)

surprisingly no (although i am freaking dying to go see that right now :D )

Ororo Monroe
06-28-2012, 10:19 PM
surprisingly no (although i am freaking dying to go see that right now :D )

Let me know how it is. The previews I was really turned me of. Then again I have a history background, and maybe carried out of the theater because of that.

the.footpad
06-29-2012, 09:33 AM
Let me know how it is. The previews I was really turned me of. Then again I have a history background, and maybe carried out of the theater because of that.

yeah i read the book and it was great. they made it really fit in and seem like it really was historically accurate (although we all know, it was not).

Ororo Monroe
07-01-2012, 12:05 PM
Here is twist on the original subject...how often do you see patterned material in steampunk? The more complex the better and how about plaid? I know Victoria made plaid fashionable before she made black fashionable. And Victorias were mad for patterns just as much as color. Around the time of the American Civil War, just after I think they introduced a new look, Polka Dots.

the.footpad
07-01-2012, 06:56 PM
Here is twist on the original subject...how often do you see patterned material in steampunk? The more complex the better and how about plaid? I know Victoria made plaid fashionable before she made black fashionable. And Victorias were mad for patterns just as much as color. Around the time of the American Civil War, just after I think they introduced a new look, Polka Dots.

funny you should say that, none of the steampunk stuff that i make is just one color or design. i always make sure that its either like black and has gold swirls on it, or black with red stripes, or (as the one im working on right now) red, white, and blue with starts on the stripes.
Im guessing though that the polka dots would be used more for women's dresses. the plaid of course could easily be used for men, especially anyone wanting to do something more "southern" Steam punk.

Mehdia
07-01-2012, 08:32 PM
Here is twist on the original subject...how often do you see patterned material in steampunk? The more complex the better and how about plaid? I know Victoria made plaid fashionable before she made black fashionable. And Victorias were mad for patterns just as much as color. Around the time of the American Civil War, just after I think they introduced a new look, Polka Dots.

I love using plaids and stripes for steampunk designs. One I've been working on for a friend is a really vibrant red with a satin shadow stripe and it looks pretty awesome. The corset is edged in black and the bustle is lined in a nice gray. I wanted to have some colors on there, but the red to stand out, so I went with neutrals to match it. She wore what I had complete at A-kon, not as a steampunk costume, but threw on the fishnets and some knee high, lacing heeled boots and it looked very showgirl, so I keep calling it her steampunk Moulin Rouge costume.

kimonocrazy
07-08-2012, 05:18 PM
I think bright colors in steampunk would be good because it would add character to your cosplay. I myself am using a red/orange jacket in my cosplay which is going to be a composer. I'm still trying to figure out stuff, but all in all I think bright colors would fine to use. I mean they had oriental brocades for their vests and what not, so bright colors should be fine.

dizzymonochrome
08-27-2012, 01:41 PM
Apparently the "steampunk = brown" misconception may come from the fact that images from the Victorian era are often sepia toned. They didn't really do color images back then. I find that even images of Queen Victoria don't show her wearing very bright colors.

However, wearing "exotic" fabrics from the east, like sari fabrics, Chinese silk, etc was very elite and fashionable. Those both had very bright, beautiful colors.

Just my 0.02

nathancarter
08-27-2012, 07:50 PM
My wife is working on initial designs for a Steampunk geisha that will have a lot of bright red in it, and probably some turquoise or green.

Falclon
08-27-2012, 09:18 PM
I've been wanting to make my first steampunk outfit for a while, and I already planned out the outfit, just need to save up money. What are y'all's opinions on peacock feathers in steampunk? It would fit with the exotic fashion you pointed out dizzy.

Mehdia
08-28-2012, 12:25 AM
I LOVE the idea of peacock feathers used in steampunk. They look great with Victorian style clothing (I made a mask (http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2534230/) for a masquerade ball to go with a Victorian outfit (http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2971009/) with peacock feathers) and the colors are rich and give you lots of options.

Celiaskyleaf
08-28-2012, 04:40 PM
Steampink Hope (http://www.flickr.com/photos/skyleafcreations/7677224580/in/set-72157630575599874/lightbox/)

Hi all I just wanted to share this photo of my bright Steampunk "Steampink Hope" that I made for a special event

Falclon
08-28-2012, 05:21 PM
I LOVE the idea of peacock feathers used in steampunk. They look great with Victorian style clothing (I made a mask (http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2534230/) for a masquerade ball to go with a Victorian outfit (http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2971009/) with peacock feathers) and the colors are rich and give you lots of options.

Glad to hear. :) Now I just have to find ones that will work for what I'm planning. I can already tell my bank account is going to hate this.

threestories
08-28-2012, 09:34 PM
I didn't realize colors were somewhat verboten in Steampunk design! I just thought a lot of people liked brown and beige :) I'm new to designing Steampunk outfits and am debuting my first attempt at Dragon*Con this Friday... it's bright cherry red with some black accents, and my hat has a peacock feather. Oops! I guess ignorance was bliss, in my case? :)

Mehdia
08-28-2012, 10:39 PM
I prefer that people mix bright colors into their steampunk costumes if it suits the style. Of course you wouldn't want something vivid and overly colored if they aren't supposed to stand out, but if you can work colors into the design, I say go for it!

Ororo Monroe
09-13-2012, 02:51 PM
I didn't realize colors were somewhat verboten in Steampunk design! I just thought a lot of people liked brown and beige :) I'm new to designing Steampunk outfits and am debuting my first attempt at Dragon*Con this Friday... it's bright cherry red with some black accents, and my hat has a peacock feather. Oops! I guess ignorance was bliss, in my case? :)

Did you see the SP Barbie at Dragoncon?

Celiaskyleaf
09-13-2012, 03:30 PM
Did you see the SP Barbie at Dragoncon?

Some one did a Steampunk Barbie now that is something I would love to see a pic of

Ororo Monroe
09-13-2012, 04:16 PM
Some one did a Steampunk Barbie now that is something I would love to see a pic of

It was on Better Mornings Atlanta. You can find a picture of it on Yaya Han's Facebook page.

Ororo Monroe
09-17-2012, 11:17 AM
What I hate is someone wearing there corset on the outside and calling it Steampunk.

Mehdia
09-17-2012, 02:40 PM
What I hate is someone wearing there corset on the outside and calling it Steampunk.

While I do use corsets at times on the outside for steampunk, I do hate when someone just throws one on and says they are now steampunk. It's sort of become the same thing as the goggles and gears. It's so cliche that it's almost completely avoided now.

Volnixshin
09-21-2012, 02:10 PM
What I hate is someone wearing there corset on the outside and calling it Steampunk.

This was brought up in a book I'm reading. The off worlder/other dimension guy wants the protagonist to wear her corset on her outside, to be more steampunk, and she's confounded by his request

I imagine in the beginning they put it on the outside to start a trend

Ororo Monroe
09-21-2012, 08:31 PM
This was brought up in a book I'm reading. The off worlder/other dimension guy wants the protagonist to wear her corset on her outside, to be more steampunk, and she's confounded by his request

I imagine in the beginning they put it on the outside to start a trend

If it's anything like reenacting (1800's on), many vistors/tourist buy really nice looking items and then wear them wrong. Chemises, corsets, pettycoats...there out wear becomes there underwear and there underwear becomes their outterwear. I guess they figure something that pretty needs to be shown off. I will admit, most of the corsets from Timeless Trends I've shown to reenactors has been described as "very French". The only thing that seems to be safe are pantalets and that probably because they have a split crotch, at least if they are accurate.

TheFontBandit
10-11-2012, 03:30 PM
What I hate is someone wearing there corset on the outside and calling it Steampunk.

And why can't it be steampunk? Steampunk is not solely limited to historically-accurate Victorian costuming. It's an alternate-history genre, which means we all get to write our own story on steampunk fashion.

Remember the whole "bustiers as outerwear" fad of the 80s? Who's to say that the fashion of corsets as outerwear couldn't have evolved in an alternate Victorian timeline where airship pirates sail the skies and time-travel is possible?

The main thing that drew me to steampunk in the first place was the irresistible blend of historic fashion pieces along with the open-ended capability to mix-and-match anachrostic or offbeat styles. The rise of the "steampunk fashion police" has really put me off the genre lately. Steampunk is fiction. There is no one steampunk rulebook.

Mehdia
10-11-2012, 05:22 PM
And why can't it be steampunk? Steampunk is not solely limited to historically-accurate Victorian costuming. It's an alternate-history genre, which means we all get to write our own story on steampunk fashion.

Remember the whole "bustiers as outerwear" fad of the 80s? Who's to say that the fashion of corsets as outerwear couldn't have evolved in an alternate Victorian timeline where airship pirates sail the skies and time-travel is possible?

The main thing that drew me to steampunk in the first place was the irresistible blend of historic fashion pieces along with the open-ended capability to mix-and-match anachrostic or offbeat styles. The rise of the "steampunk fashion police" has really put me off the genre lately. Steampunk is fiction. There is no one steampunk rulebook.

I couldn't agree with you more!

While I don't like the idea of just throwing on a corset and goggles and calling it steampunk, there are ways to use the stereotypical items and make it unique.

I'm drawn to the creative side of steampunk, so I don't like when people start saying something is or isn't steampunk. It's a genre that is what you make of it.

TheFontBandit
10-12-2012, 01:30 PM
I'm drawn to the creative side of steampunk, so I don't like when people start saying something is or isn't steampunk. It's a genre that is what you make of it.

Exactly! I think saying "Well, you can't do X or Y... and whatever you do, don't do Z" really hampers creativity. I love seeing how inventive people can be with steampunk, and I think creativity really flourishes best when you can say, "start with X and see where it takes you". It makes the whole genre more fun when it's more open-ended, rather than restrictive.

I also honestly have no real problem with people just sticking gears on things either, but I know that's a sticking point for a lot of people, too. I figure we add plenty of non-functional items to our clothing nowadays purely for aesthetic value (hello rhinestones, studs, non-functioning buttons, and superfluous zippers). So why not gears, if you like the look of them? If it were Fleur-de-Lis shaped buttons, would it be an issue? It's intriguing when people really do take into account actual mechanics and make functioning gears, but I don't think it should be a requirement.

Anyway... yeah, I'm always for just doing what appeals to you. If that's a lime-green and hot pink ensemble using Victorian silhouettes and fabric types as an inspiration, power to you! (The Nerfpunk group at last year's D*C really made me smile). I love seeing things I haven't seen before, and I'm a big fan of bright/rich colors in general. Brown hues do evoke a specific "old-timey feeling", but I'll admit I'm getting bored with a sepia steampunk wardrobe and I'm really starting to play more with color, even if it is outside the box.

Mehdia
10-13-2012, 02:11 AM
Exactly! I think saying "Well, you can't do X or Y... and whatever you do, don't do Z" really hampers creativity. I love seeing how inventive people can be with steampunk, and I think creativity really flourishes best when you can say, "start with X and see where it takes you". It makes the whole genre more fun when it's more open-ended, rather than restrictive.

I also honestly have no real problem with people just sticking gears on things either, but I know that's a sticking point for a lot of people, too. I figure we add plenty of non-functional items to our clothing nowadays purely for aesthetic value (hello rhinestones, studs, non-functioning buttons, and superfluous zippers). So why not gears, if you like the look of them? If it were Fleur-de-Lis shaped buttons, would it be an issue? It's intriguing when people really do take into account actual mechanics and make functioning gears, but I don't think it should be a requirement.

Anyway... yeah, I'm always for just doing what appeals to you. If that's a lime-green and hot pink ensemble using Victorian silhouettes and fabric types as an inspiration, power to you! (The Nerfpunk group at last year's D*C really made me smile). I love seeing things I haven't seen before, and I'm a big fan of bright/rich colors in general. Brown hues do evoke a specific "old-timey feeling", but I'll admit I'm getting bored with a sepia steampunk wardrobe and I'm really starting to play more with color, even if it is outside the box.

Wow, you really do think about it a lot like I do! I'm so happy to see someone else who views steampunk the way I do. While I won't just stick gears on things, I do still use them (like on my hat for my wind-up doll and a few other things). I think they can be aesthetically pleasing if used in certain ways and not just crammed on every surface.

I am in love with the idea of doing colors in steampunk. The very first costume (http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2988119/) I made for someone that was steampunk was brown leather, off white shirt, and blood red corset and bustle. One of mine (http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2726408/) (which I've yet to finish) is charcoal gray with navy blue accents. And then most recently for a friend I did a bright red shadow stripe corset and bustle (http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2868506/) that was accented in black and silvery gray (it still needs the steam added to it, but we might go with it being a steampunk showgirl a la the Moulin Rouge). I think it's fun to play with color, theme, style, and accessories in steampunk. It's like a free for all and can come out being some of the coolest stuff ever.

Ororo Monroe
10-14-2012, 11:06 AM
What I'm trying to say is that throwing a corset on and calling it Steampunk is like going to any event (Renfaire, American history, Fantasy, Sci-fi, Anime, etc.), buying things from vendors, throwing them on any sort of way, and then say "Hah, now I'm one of you." No thought, no planning, not even starting with X and seeing where it takes you. Having done Living History and having had people tear apart my impression because I don't look just like them, I'm am very reluctant to critique. However, when no thought whatsoever is applied then I kick. After all, if you are going to do something shouldn't you at least try to do it right?

TheFontBandit
10-18-2012, 04:56 PM
But what is "right", in a genre that's speculative anyway? The reasoning is simple: "I like the look of this corset on the outside, so that's how I'm going to wear it". It's aesthetically-pleasing; that's the thought applied.

How is one able to tell just by looking at another person's ensemble how much "thought" or "planning" went into that outfit's design? Perhaps that costumer's thought process is just different. Besides that, is there a benchmark for exactly how much one should plan out an outfit before they're allowed to wear something they enjoy? Maybe it's not even a costume - maybe they just like the look of jeans, a tank top, and a corset. Are they harming anyone by wearing an outfit that doesn't meet some arbitrary standard for thoughtfulness?

Living history and re-enactment groups have set rules because their purpose is to recreate something that existed in the past. Steampunk is not a genre based on accuracy, and someone should be able to wear as much or as little steampunk as they like - it's a fashion sensibility just as much as anything else, and people mix-and-match fashion all the time. Mostly Lolita with a top hat and goggles? Jeans and a tank with big stompy goth boots? Sure, why not?

Dictamnus Albus
10-23-2012, 01:59 AM
thats true and all but still,
you cant be wearing an "uncle sam" costume
and slap on a pair of leather goggle, and say your steampunk sam
tai, from digimon or naruto in the first 5 or so episodes, is not steampunk

or tack some small gears onto some air jordans, and call em steampunk shoes

you can have "brilliant" colours, its even period correct, but i forget the term/name of the dye type
heck go eye searing neon if you want,

you can steampunk alot, but there has to be some guideline as to what truly qualifies
as "steampunk"
most will accept that steampunk dosnt mean victorian industrialist si-fi

but like i said, you cant just slap on a corset, gears, goggles, or whatever and say its steampunk

just like i cant over dose on bronzer and claim im hispanic, as racist as that may sound

when you wear somthing for aesthetics, it should be considered "self-styled"
unless it fits into the general concensus of a certian fashion

Volnixshin
10-24-2012, 07:53 PM
Sure you CAN.

It's like this:
people who dress up in lame, store sold halloween costumes, and declare themselves cosplayers, vs people who make or really put in effort for their cosplays, spending hours, and weeks on them.

I would say that's pretty comparable

Mehdia
10-25-2012, 01:10 AM
Sure you CAN.

It's like this:
people who dress up in lame, store sold halloween costumes, and declare themselves cosplayers, vs people who make or really put in effort for their cosplays, spending hours, and weeks on them.

I would say that's pretty comparable

You said it perfectly. It's all about perspective. What might be the end all be all for one person doesn't make it the same for another. And you can't force your idea of something on someone else. It has to be what they feel is right. Sure, I get tired of seeing the generic goggles and gears, but if that's what the person wants, let them have it. I've used gears, goggles, and corsets in several steampunk costumes, but does that automatically make me look like I'm just going "Yep, steampunk" while nodding and looking smug without knowing a thing about the genre? Nope. It just means that at the time of the design, I felt it was what I wanted to use. Who knows, maybe next time I will do something totally different.