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BruisedBlood
03-25-2012, 10:56 AM
i was wondering how do you take an awesome picture of your cosplay?? Ive failed trying to once and i dont want to fail again :lost: tips on taking great photo's would be nice to know

Mogwai
03-25-2012, 12:26 PM
Green-Makakas made a really helpful tutorial on how to take
better photos here (http://browse.deviantart.com/?qh=&section=&q=cosplay+basic+photo+tutorial#/d4kpxtz) on deviantart, it helped me out quite a bit. C=

BruisedBlood
03-25-2012, 12:46 PM
Thanks ill look into it:}

Over9000images
03-25-2012, 01:04 PM
i was wondering how do you take an awesome picture of your cosplay?? Ive failed trying to once and i dont want to fail again :lost: tips on taking great photo's would be nice to know

Hey Sarori, I'll pm you some tips :P. Feel free to tell me if you find they're useful or not ^-^.

BruisedBlood
03-25-2012, 01:10 PM
thank u ^^!! i hope they work:heart:

Ashurachan
03-26-2012, 04:23 AM
Learn to use your camera.

Foques
03-27-2012, 02:27 PM
^
ditto.

same question as
How can I cook better?
How can I get stronger?
How do I draw these awesome comics?

there isn't an answer that will just make you good at that. there are books to be read, hours to be spent learning, failures to be endured.

pocky_penguin66
03-27-2012, 02:41 PM
Take TONS of photos. You can always delete the bad ones later :)

brucer007
03-31-2012, 03:29 AM
Look at samples of photos similar to what you want to take. Figure out why you like them, and try to duplicate what you can. Learning about how to control your camera will help you a lot.

Learn about shutter speeds. They help you get clear photos, especially when there is movement, or low light levels.

Learn about lens openings. This helps you control how much in focus your foregrounds and backgrounds will be.

Understanding composition will help you make your photos more interesting and pleasing.
Be very thoughtful about what is in your photo and what you want to keep out of it.

Lighting also has a big effect. Observe if the lighting looks good or unflattering. If it looks bad, then move to a different direction or location. Direct sunlight is often too harsh in the middle of the day. Try the shade, or just turn them away from the sun. You can use reflectors to add light.

Posing can be challenging. Study poses from other photos, or poses of the character you will be photographing.

BruisedBlood
03-31-2012, 10:29 AM
Take TONS of photos. You can always delete the bad ones later :)

thats what i always doXD i take like 20pictures and can keep like 2 out of them the rest i delete

BruisedBlood
03-31-2012, 10:30 AM
Look at samples of photos similar to what you want to take. Figure out why you like them, and try to duplicate what you can. Learning about how to control your camera will help you a lot.

Learn about shutter speeds. They help you get clear photos, especially when there is movement, or low light levels.

Learn about lens openings. This helps you control how much in focus your foregrounds and backgrounds will be.

Understanding composition will help you make your photos more interesting and pleasing.
Be very thoughtful about what is in your photo and what you want to keep out of it.

Lighting also has a big effect. Observe if the lighting looks good or unflattering. If it looks bad, then move to a different direction or location. Direct sunlight is often too harsh in the middle of the day. Try the shade, or just turn them away from the sun. You can use reflectors to add light.

Posing can be challenging. Study poses from other photos, or poses of the character you will be photographing.

Can u recommend any good camera?

brucer007
03-31-2012, 03:33 PM
"Good" is a relative quality. So is "budget". If you want the most control and best quality, a DSLR will be a good choice, if you can find what you want for the price you are willing to spend. These cameras give you the option of changing lenses, and they have a wide range of lenses to choose from. If you are willing to look for a used camera, the price could start around $300. New ones tend to start at more than double that price. Most major brands will give you good quality.

Otherwise, you might do fine with a point-and-shoot camera, which you could find used starting around $60, or new for around $150 and up.

It all depends on what level of camera is good to your needs.

BruisedBlood
03-31-2012, 03:54 PM
"Good" is a relative quality. So is "budget". If you want the most control and best quality, a DSLR will be a good choice, if you can find what you want for the price you are willing to spend. These cameras give you the option of changing lenses, and they have a wide range of lenses to choose from. If you are willing to look for a used camera, the price could start around $300. New ones tend to start at more than double that price. Most major brands will give you good quality.

Otherwise, you might do fine with a point-and-shoot camera, which you could find used starting around $60, or new for around $150 and up.

It all depends on what level of camera is good to your needs.

Okay thank you!!

Lina Simth
12-06-2012, 12:10 AM
"Good" is a relative quality. So is "budget". If you want the most control and best quality, a DSLR will be a good choice, if you can find what you want for the price you are willing to spend. These cameras give you the option of changing lenses, and they have a wide range of lenses to choose from. If you are willing to look for a used camera, the price could start around $300. New ones tend to start at more than double that price. Most major brands will give you good quality.

Otherwise, you might do fine with a point-and-shoot camera, which you could find used starting around $60, or new for around $150 and up.

It all depends on what level of camera is good to your needs.

Seems quite professional.

nathancarter
12-06-2012, 12:44 PM
Responding to an older post, but here goes.

Look at samples of photos similar to what you want to take. Figure out why you like them, and try to duplicate what you can. Learning about how to control your camera will help you a lot.

Learn about shutter speeds. They help you get clear photos, especially when there is movement, or low light levels.

Learn about lens openings. This helps you control how much in focus your foregrounds and backgrounds will be.

Understanding composition will help you make your photos more interesting and pleasing.
Be very thoughtful about what is in your photo and what you want to keep out of it.

Lighting also has a big effect. Observe if the lighting looks good or unflattering. If it looks bad, then move to a different direction or location. Direct sunlight is often too harsh in the middle of the day. Try the shade, or just turn them away from the sun. You can use reflectors to add light.

Posing can be challenging. Study poses from other photos, or poses of the character you will be photographing.

Bruce provides quality advice, as usual.

I might rearrange the ordering, however. In my opinion, the lighting is the most important component of most photographs - especially portraiture. In fact, the very word "photograph" means to write with light. Lighting can really make or break a portrait. The on-camera flash will very rarely give pleasing light - it will always look "flat" and often washed-out. There are instances where you can use it (e.g. for a little bit of fill) but it should almost never be your main source of light.

After that, it's posing and composition, which go hand-in-hand. As part of composing a pleasing portrait, you must pay equal attention to the subject and to the background. Look past the subject; find background elements that will frame the subject well; hide or obscure elements that will be distracting or unpleasant. Posing can be hard; however, cosplay posing can be easy if you have reference material for the character.

If you have a DSLR, get the book Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson. Read it, learn it, practice it, read it again. Understand it thoroughly enough that every page of the book feels like simple common sense.

Like Bruce mentions, study other photos that you like. How is the subject posed? What's in the background? Most importantly, where's the light coming from?

jeproxshots
12-31-2012, 02:34 PM
Master basic composition (rule of thirds), then (much later on) learn other compositions like golden ratio, and using stuff like the dutch tilt. We practice rule of thirds over and over again so when we find that perfect shot we can take it without thinking like riding a bike. This video from BH explains it really well after watching this one i think my photography got a lot better. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtcD84l9eUw

Learning how shapes affect images is good too. A good tutorial that touches on shapes and basic comp is: http://photoinf.com/General/Peter_Saw/Tutorial_on_Composition/Contents.htm



A good series to watch are those created by the framed network on youtube. http://www.youtube.com/user/framedshow
Their shows "Framed" and "Film" have some great tips in them.

Good tutorials available here
http://www.youtube.com/user/GreatPhotographyTips


For those who clicked the tutorial for shapes you see thats a tutorial for paintings. I suggest viewing other art mediums out side of photography especially paintings and drawings. Alot of techniques we pull into photography come from these other art forms. One good example of this is rembrant lighting
http://people.rit.edu/andpph/photoforum/pdf/rembrandt_lighting.pdf

I think BH has has a good tutorial on rembrant lighting im being rushed to do something while typing this so cant look it up... I hope this helps you guys out


--Jeff