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Inanna
07-10-2005, 02:49 PM
Is there an easier way to do red eye reduction in Photoshop besides using the lasso or wand and choosing color balance? Graduated from Paint Shop Pro to Photoshop because there is a lot more manipulation that can be done in Photoshop. I miss the red eye reduction of Paint Shop Pro though. I could just choose the eye color of the subject, center it over the red eye and voila. I'm hoping Photoshop has something as simple, but I can't seem to find any readily available references to it for Photoshop.

Inanna

ZiggyB
07-10-2005, 05:23 PM
There are a few Photoshop plug-in's that do automatic red eye reduction. Just do a search on Google to find them.

I don't know if any of them are free though. Maybe someone else knows of one and can post about it.

bob1968m
07-10-2005, 05:47 PM
There are a few Photoshop plug-in's that do automatic red eye reduction. Just do a search on Google to find them.

I don't know if any of them are free though. Maybe someone else knows of one and can post about it.


I don't have it but the new version of photoshop, cs2, has a auto redeye tool. I always get frustrated with the auto tools since they don't work in a certain percentage of cases and I end up using the following method which takes a bit of time, but i can do all cases and usually ends up looking better than even when the redeye tools work. i wrote this up for my brother who gets bad red eye on his small kids. I got sick of fixing his pics for him. he loves it.

----

i use the lasso or ellispse selection (with feather 1
or 2) to get the whole iris, including the normal
white highlight. i copy that selection to a new layer
(ctrl-j).

then i go to Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation.

in that dialog i pull the saturation slider to the
left till the red goes gray, then i pull the lightness
slider to left to darken it. i mess with it till it
looks right. sometimes total black is too much and
sometimes i don't need to do one or the other
depending on the problem. but some combo usually
works.

I hit OK, and then create a layer mask and paint out
the effect from the natural white highlight since that
gets blacked out as well on the previous step.

Ami Yuy
07-18-2005, 07:19 PM
Because I didn't want to have to select the pupil all the time, I've started duplicating the background/photo and filling the red area on the eye with black. And by playing with the Tolerance I make sure that the white reflection stays there so they don't look like a zombie. Then sometimes I'll change the opacity of the duplicated layer with the black to make it look more natural.

Example: http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=407269
Original: http://photobucket.com/albums/v90/amiyuy/Cosplay/How-To/?action=view&current=DSCN9742.jpg

In this case it didn't work perfectly because the red had bled into the white a bit and there were some odd flashes in some eyes, but it's the best example I could come up with right now.

skypirate
07-20-2005, 01:20 PM
I don't have it but the new version of photoshop, cs2, has a auto redeye tool. I always get frustrated with the auto tools since they don't work in a certain percentage of cases and I end up using the following method which takes a bit of time, but i can do all cases and usually ends up looking better than even when the redeye tools work. i wrote this up for my brother who gets bad red eye on his small kids. I got sick of fixing his pics for him. he loves it.

----

i use the lasso or ellispse selection (with feather 1
or 2) to get the whole iris, including the normal
white highlight. i copy that selection to a new layer
(ctrl-j).

then i go to Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation.

in that dialog i pull the saturation slider to the
left till the red goes gray, then i pull the lightness
slider to left to darken it. i mess with it till it
looks right. sometimes total black is too much and
sometimes i don't need to do one or the other
depending on the problem. but some combo usually
works.

I hit OK, and then create a layer mask and paint out
the effect from the natural white highlight since that
gets blacked out as well on the previous step.

Let me offer a slight variation. Since red is the offending color, when you're in the Hue/Saturation window, where it says Master, choose Reds. Very cool. You might be able to skip the layer mask/painting steps.

I prefer to apply the Brightness/Contrast control exclusively to the Red channel instead, reducing the brightness to darken the pupil and upping the contrast to restore the highlights at the same time.

Vicky
07-20-2005, 02:20 PM
I do like Ami, paint it Black *L*

bob1968m
07-20-2005, 02:57 PM
Let me offer a slight variation. Since red is the offending color, when you're in the Hue/Saturation window, where it says Master, choose Reds. Very cool. You might be able to skip the layer mask/painting steps.

I prefer to apply the Brightness/Contrast control exclusively to the Red channel instead, reducing the brightness to darken the pupil and upping the contrast to restore the highlights at the same time.


Thx skypirate, i just tried it on an old pic of my nephew. worked great.

skypirate
07-20-2005, 05:32 PM
Thx skypirate, i just tried it on an old pic of my nephew. worked great.

Love your gallery. It was great to know some one else was using a similar technique. Of course the real solution for all of us is to avoid getting red eyes in the first place. But that's another topic.

Danners
07-22-2005, 11:29 AM
There are many ways to get rid of red-eye so it's just a matter of finding a way that works best for you.

While the previous mentioned methods are perfectly fine (I used to do similar methods myself), I found another way which I normally use.

I just selected the feathered circular brush (instead of a hard circle, it has a softer edge), adjust it's size to what I need, select a proper colour, and just keep clicking until I get the desired darkness. It's pretty simple and works well in most situations.

Admin
07-22-2005, 03:18 PM
Let me offer a slight variation. Since red is the offending color, when you're in the Hue/Saturation window, where it says Master, choose Reds. Very cool. You might be able to skip the layer mask/painting steps.

I prefer to apply the Brightness/Contrast control exclusively to the Red channel instead, reducing the brightness to darken the pupil and upping the contrast to restore the highlights at the same time.

Another tip along these lines - this trick also works really well using the yellow channel for whitening up teeth.

skypirate
07-22-2005, 11:27 PM
Another tip along these lines - this trick also works really well using the yellow channel for whitening up teeth.

That's excellent. Thanks for the tip.