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Jujubeans
08-05-2005, 03:49 PM
I have this really old and very nice german camera from the first half of the 1900's. It has lenses, a flash, the works plus the old leather carrrying case. It works just as good as the other cameras for my preference, but what does everyone else prefer?

rayquo
08-05-2005, 03:53 PM
Digicams are always good. I'm pretty amateur, I usually cosplay more than I photograph, but when I photograph at cons, I abandoned my old film camera for a digicam ^^

Vicky
08-05-2005, 03:53 PM
I have a really old Canon SLR myself. Costed over a grand at the time, now it's probably not even worth $100 *L* I can't really figure out all the advanced features, but it still works pretty well.

tfcreate
08-05-2005, 11:43 PM
It depends. The so-called old school cameras require the skills of both an artist and a scientist. The new ones require that you set to auto and hit a button. Zero skills.
Digital is very fast and convient, but there are abilities and artistry that no digital camera or automatics could ever do. Like being able to compose your shot by eye alone. Since they aren't needed for the autos, they're never developed. SLR, TLR and Large format cameras are going the way of the dinosaur, so to is the real artistry.

TFC

Ashurachan
08-06-2005, 03:39 AM
I'd say that for cons, a modern camera is better, because taking a picture with them is way quicker - sometimes you just come accross someone with a nice costume, and want to take a picture of it, and the cosplayer's in a rush... Sure this old camera of yours takes nice pictures, but keep that for moments you have some time - photoshoots for example.

gmontem
08-06-2005, 04:06 AM
It depends. The so-called old school cameras require the skills of both an artist and a scientist. The new ones require that you set to auto and hit a button. Zero skills.
My digital camera doesn't have an "auto mode" so nyah. :razz:

Jujubeans, what kind of camera is it and who made it?

Jujubeans
08-06-2005, 02:59 PM
I don't have it on me, but it's German made, starts with a V and the name is very long.

tfcreate
08-06-2005, 07:18 PM
I don't have it on me, but it's German made, starts with a V and the name is very long.

Voigtländer?

And C'mon.... every digital camera has some kind of automatic mode...
TFC

Jujubeans
08-06-2005, 08:13 PM
Yeah, that sounds right.

Super No 1
08-06-2005, 11:18 PM
It depends. The so-called old school cameras require the skills of both an artist and a scientist. The new ones require that you set to auto and hit a button. Zero skills.

I'm just gonna leave that alone for now and just say that I like my digital camera. I even like my old one that broke.

tfcreate
08-07-2005, 01:32 AM
I'm just gonna leave that alone for now and just say that I like my digital camera. I even like my old one that broke.

Don't get me wrong, I'm slamming the machine, not the user. I seldom use the automatic functions on my cameras if at all. My point is there is the seduction of surrendering our abilities for convience. That convience could be costing us more than we realise.
TFC

TomodachiFriend
08-08-2005, 02:48 AM
My digital camera doesn't have an "auto mode" so nyah. :razz:

Jujubeans, what kind of camera is it and who made it?

A digicam without an auto mode? Is it a Minolta with only a P (progam) mode? The P mode is just like auto but with a few options added. I'm not sure what other manufacturers call that mode but I know Canon & Nikon call it P too. I don't see the use of having both P and Auto but if it takes the stress out of people who are scared to mess things up... I like the looks of people when I hand over an SLR and tell them to take a picture for me.

Ryouko
08-11-2005, 12:16 AM
I like the control and comfort of my 35mm camera. n.n;

jtnishi
08-11-2005, 12:51 AM
Well, thankfully, for the old school folks who need to get into the digital age, and have some money lying around to burn, there's always the option of going with a digital back for the old style cameras. Either that, or picking up a more "manual" digital body like the Epson RD-1. Then you don't have to give up the old school style. ^^

Frankly, I love my digital, but I confess I do miss that solid heft that can only come from an old school film camera made from real metal. ^^

Don't get me wrong, I'm slamming the machine, not the user. I seldom use the automatic functions on my cameras if at all. My point is there is the seduction of surrendering our abilities for convience. That convience could be costing us more than we realise.
TFC

As for automatic controls, the nice thing about a number of digital cameras is that you haven't necessarily lost much of what you could have had with the old stuff. You can set it to an auto mode, and just let it take the picture, but you can also control them fairly well. Frankly, though, I see very little wrong with automatic modes for those who don't have the time/patience to learn it. The automatic modes in most cameras still haven't figured out composition yet, and that tends to be more important than what the automatic modes can do anyway. I'd rather someone spend time learning their composition while shooting in full automatic, rather than futz around spending time trying to get all the whiz bang stuff out of the technicals of the camera, but screw up on the basics.

In the end, they all take nice pictures with some practice. But I'll definitely not miss those film development costs from the old school.

Tenchan
08-11-2005, 01:39 AM
There is a horrid misconception about Digital cams: that they require no skill to use, and you can't do anything wrong.

This is wrong. Just like with the old cams, depending on the quality (and price) of your digicam, you can do a number of things wrong. The lighting, the calm of your hand, and last but not least the knowledge about perspective and focus are just as important with a digicam as with an old cam. Sure, there are digicams that can do everything for you (mine can't, for that matter) ... just like there are 'old-school' cams that a total newbie can use perfectly fine. My father is an absolute camera nut, and I have grown up holding cameras from nearly every decade since 1950 in my hand at least once. I took terrible photos with an old cam, and even more terrible ones with a digicam. I took great photos with an old one, and great photos with a digicam.

The really important difference for the common 'clicker' is only one: the medium the photos land on. Film versus data files. And here, I definitely prefer a digicam with a good memory for a con, because I don't have to carry extra film around with me.

(Ultimately though, I prefer camcorders =3 Moving pictures over still ones anytime.)

Jujubeans
08-12-2005, 01:38 PM
(Ultimately though, I prefer camcorders =3 Moving pictures over still ones anytime.)
:P Haha.. every cosplayer should have one handy for every con.

negolith
08-13-2005, 01:07 AM
both are essential

digicam useful because of no film and the ability to review the shot on most of them with the included LCD screen

But the film ones take the most awesome pictures, and you can do so with a digital also, but the newer digital cameras seem to be not really suited for the portrait

use the digital for the quick and the candid, but break out the film for the totally amazing costumes

Jun_Kazama
08-13-2005, 02:23 AM
I like both, it depends on what I'm using them for.
I have a Sony cybershot digicam and I tend to use that more nowadays just because its a lot cheaper and easier to get the photos onto my computer. I use it more for quick pictures like when I'm hanging out with freinds and whatnot.
I also have an old manual Pentax K1000 thats probably older than I am and I love that camera. I tend to use that for more "artistic" stuff or more planned out photos.

My Pentax takes perfect pictures whereas my digicam pictures I have to touch up in photoshop, and even then they aren't as good.

I try to bring both to cons with me but it usually depends on how much stuff I want to carry and whether I have the room. My pentax is somewhat heavy and I need to bring my tripod around with me at night so I tend to stick with my digicam because of that.

vivisha
08-13-2005, 11:06 AM
I have NO ideal

shiroin
08-31-2005, 04:55 AM
everytime u press the shutter on a film cam the shutter is eating money away
with digital u can go shutter mad if you like :)

JadeCat
08-31-2005, 12:34 PM
I started off w/ Canon, and admittedly, I am a Canon girl.

I still have my old AE-1 that I started photography classes with.
I have a film Rebel.

Then my first digicam, the Canon G3 that I still use when I need a "smaller" camera. Then there's my baby, the Canon 20D. I'd still like to get an even smaller camera, one of the Canon Powershots or maybe the Elph, for those times when carrying around a G3 or a 20D isn't feasible and I want to hide the camera in a small carrying purse.