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jtnishi
08-29-2005, 10:43 AM
I've got a set of questions that has bothered me for at least a little while, and since this seems the most logical forum to ask such questions, I thought I'd ask them here.

Since we post pictures of cosplayers that we take on the internet, I've been a little worried at times about some cosplayer running into their picture, and then coming around and filing a lawsuit for invasion of privacy. I'm sure most of us don't make nearly enough money to deal with any lawsuit, so such a risk should be at least somewhat worrisome.

While anime conventions and gatherings sometimes take place in what would be deemed public areas, such that freedom of the press rights might presumably have precedence, a lot of smaller conventions take place on private property. While there'd still normally be no expectation of privacy at an event open to the public (albeit at a fee), I'm still a little worried. As far as I know, most conventions don't put it in their published policies that by attending a convention, you are subject to being photographed for press and personal purposes. And frankly, I'm pretty sure most of us don't go running around carrying model release forms, asking every cosplayer we take pictures of to sign. The biggest hint was Fanime, when press staff wanted the photographers who had press badges to do exactly that and in addition to give them a copy, with the majority pretty much ignoring the request.

I'm guessing that most of the photographers use a similar set of policies: something along the lines of not necessarily collecting model releases, not necessarily proactively informing the cosplayers that pictures may be posted on the internet, but complying with any requests to remove pictures when they are. This is the policy I've been using for a while, and while I almost certainly should change to a policy where at least I inform people, I've been slow to do so.

However, for the sake of enlightenment, for the photographers, how many of you out there deal with model releases for any/all of the subjects you take pictures of? If you do deal with model releases, do any of you know a clever way to deal with them such that perhaps collecting them could be made only a minimal hassle? Do you automatically inform cosplayers when you take their picture that it may be posted on the internet? When someone asks you to remove their picture from your site, do you comply with their requests?

On the opposite side of the camera, for the cosplayers out there, do you guys assume that when people take pictures of you now that the likelihood of any picture getting posted to the internet is high? In easier words, is it sufficient that when we take pictures, the assumption is built in that we can/will post to the internet, or would it be better for photographers to make their intentions clear? Do you believe that most other cosplayers believe the same? Also, when you do find unflattering pictures of yourself on the internet, how do you tend to react? Do you guys also try to look for contact information if you need to get in touch with photographers? When you find unflattering pictures, are you proactive in asking for them to be pulled down?

Also, if anyone out there happens to be knowledgeable in privacy law (as in a privacy lawyer who would know, or someone who has been advised by a lawyer on the subject, not just someone who makes an interpretation based on their best guess), can you provide some enlightenment as to the rights of freedom of the press in convention situations, and the enforceability of informal and formal model releases? Have I made the correct assumptions above, or is there a misinterpretation above there that could be critical? I'm not a lawyer, so I'm pretty uncertain how much of what I know is correct or not.

While I don't necessarily lose a lot of sleep pondering these questions, I'd sure like to know so that I won't lose a lot of sleep worrying about some issues in the future. Thanks! :chatah:

Shania_Nowhere
08-29-2005, 11:30 AM
For most of us who photograph cosplayers, we usually ask "can I take your picture?" and if they say yes, that's our sort of release form. If later they find their picture on the net and ask for it to be removed, then we will comply. It would be retarded not to, I mean, it's not us in the picture. :-p Also, you should never just take a random picture of someone (Ex. sneak up and snap a shot) even if you think it'd be a great picture, they get ticked off when you do that. If you're gonna do that, at least turn off the flash so they don't catch you. :-p

Likewise, if we're asked to be photographed, it is your job to tell them no if you don't wish to be on the internet (which will most likely happen, although I have yet to see myself there...) or yes if you don't mind. It's all pretty much understood among cosplayers, and if someone is new to it they will learn soon enough.

sahmah
08-29-2005, 12:44 PM
On the opposite side of the camera, for the cosplayers out there, do you guys assume that when people take pictures of you now that the likelihood of any picture getting posted to the internet is high? In easier words, is it sufficient that when we take pictures, the assumption is built in that we can/will post to the internet, or would it be better for photographers to make their intentions clear? Do you believe that most other cosplayers believe the same? Also, when you do find unflattering pictures of yourself on the internet, how do you tend to react? Do you guys also try to look for contact information if you need to get in touch with photographers? When you find unflattering pictures, are you proactive in asking for them to be pulled down?
When someone takes a picture of me, even if they don't plan to post it on the internet, I always assume that others will see it. I think most cosplayers don't mind being posted and if they really do, they would tell the photographer. Also, if you're very worried about someone getting mad, you can pass out cards with the site the pictures are on. I've gotten several cards like this. If I find an unflattering picture, I just tend to laugh about it and say "I don't remember making a face that weird." Sometimes I automatically assume someone will be posting the picture on a site because of their camera. I knew the pictures EBK took of me would be posted because 1. I recognized him and 2. He knew what he was doing with his equipment.

AgentSakur9
08-29-2005, 04:55 PM
I'll take a stab at this... mind you this is from my experience...

However, for the sake of enlightenment, for the photographers, how many of you out there deal with model releases for any/all of the subjects you take pictures of?

I deal with Model Releases only when I am doing outside show work. Often I'll be asked to do a Photoshoot of some sort. The release form is embedded in the contract I use. I prefer contracts because it specifically states what each party will get.

If you do deal with model releases, do any of you know a clever way to deal with them such that perhaps collecting them could be made only a minimal hassle?

If you want to use them for a show... I'd say make them readily available online and bring plenty of copies with you. For photoshoots it's quite easy. Just e-mail it to your subject ahead of time and have them bring it with them. Also make sure they fill out TWO copies of the form. One for them to keep and one for yourself.

Do you automatically inform cosplayers when you take their picture that it may be posted on the internet?

Not always, but it's implicated by my badge. Some people know who I am before I meet them. I often bring business cards with me and give those out. Sadly, I am not as robust as I should be with marketing my site. Also my photographers are required to wear "Photographer Badges" along with the show badges as well.

When someone asks you to remove their picture from your site, do you comply with their requests?

Depends... if it's someone I know personally... I am pretty slow with removing the picture. If its a complete stranger, than usually I do it right away. Interestingly enough, I rarely get people asking to have their picture removed.

Bottom line, the more professional your demeanor is the better. Have your business cards ready, have your release forms with you if someone demands it and have your portfolio with you.

Many cosplayers are artists and want their work to be shown to the world. Costumes are meant to be shown off and worn. All we photographers do is capture it so that the memory and costumes live forever. ^_^

I wrote a "how to deal with photographers" tips page a long time ago, PM me if you want to see it. I am not sure if it's ok to post here.. and I have been too lazy to e-mail the admin about it. LOL

ZiggyB
08-29-2005, 05:04 PM
jtnishi: I basically do what you do, post the pictures and if someone asks to have their picture taken down, I take them down. It's not written anywhere on my web site though. Funny enough, I can't remember an instance where anyone asked me take a photo down. Maybe I'm really careful not to post embarrassing or objectionable photos?

For the most part, I think that as long as you're not running a for-profit web site, you're less likely a target for litigation? I say less likely, because it's still possible.

I did recently have an instance in which a convention asked to use my photos for official publicity reasons. I thought that would have been really cool actually. :) But I had to decline because I just didn't want to deal with model releases and the the legal ramifications.

Maybe I should rethink that if more people start offering monies for my work.

jtnishi
08-29-2005, 06:18 PM
For most of us who photograph cosplayers, we usually ask "can I take your picture?" and if they say yes, that's our sort of release form. If later they find their picture on the net and ask for it to be removed, then we will comply.
Yeah, I suppose I've always thought about that as the default mode of acceptance. The key problem is that implicit oral agreements of that sort obviously don't detail what the photographer is allowed to do. After all, I could take your picture, then theoretically sell it to some random cosplay book publisher for $X, without directly informing the cosplayer of such. Or worse yet, I can take said picture, post it on the net, fill with unflattering comment, blatently insulting folks behind their back.

To a certain extent, this is why I ask the questions, because I know, for example, that on occasions people have hotlinked (stupidly) to pictures on our site, posted it to some forum, and posted unflattering comments about the picture & it's subject(s). And while I can certainly take action against those instances I know/find out about, for every instance that I can find out about, there's bound to be some number that I can't.

Of course, a liberal removal policy helps some of this, but given that we watermark our pictures now, you can see why I'm at least a little bit afraid of someone coming after us in case the picture looks bad to them. I obviously don't generally post pictures that look bad to me, but such judgments are subjective. Releases sort of negate something like that, since it acts as at least a semi-formal document of liability waiver to some extent. Of course, the question is whether it's worth dealing with the hassle each time I want to take a picture.

Sometimes I automatically assume someone will be posting the picture on a site because of their camera. I knew the pictures EBK took of me would be posted because 1. I recognized him and 2. He knew what he was doing with his equipment.

Well, that works for those photographers that are easily recognizeable or those running around with massively pro equipment. I'd like to think most SLR users fall into here, but frankly, given the number of people who now have a Digital Rebel XT like I do, and given I don't have a massive flash that would at least look professional, and given that I don't proactively advertise that I take pictures for a site, I get the feeling I blend in to the amateurs. That approach works for a few guys, but I'm sure the rest of us don't get recognized.

That said, at least it's good to hear that you do assume that pictures can/will be posted.

Bottom line, the more professional your demeanor is the better. Have your business cards ready, have your release forms with you if someone demands it and have your portfolio with you.

Sounds like that's probably sound advice. Usually, there's someone within our group carrying print versions of our pictures anyway. And I have business cards at the ready. I suppose throwing in a few half-sheet style model release forms wouldn't hurt.

For the most part, I think that as long as you're not running a for-profit web site, you're less likely a target for litigation? I say less likely, because it's still possible.

Frankly, that's the reason this is much more of a question to me than it would be. If we were running for-profits, a model release starts seeming like a no-brainer, because it removes any question about rights to royalties/payment as well. It's because we do non-profit type sites that this is a gray zone, I think.

I did recently have an instance in which a convention asked to use my photos for official publicity reasons. I thought that would have been really cool actually. But I had to decline because I just didn't want to deal with model releases and the the legal ramifications.

Well, obviously, you already know we let one convention use one of ours in print publicity, and apparently, just with an oral release (since I don't think I ever heard anything from Rob about getting you guys to sign a formal release). However, I guess if you guys haven't come after me at this point, I'm probably safe. =P But, back to the topic at hand...

--------------------

So from the comments so far, it sounds like at least the assumption that pictures might get posted on the internet might be somewhat built in to the community, which I guess is a good thing.

I haven't gotten many requests for removal either (I think only maybe one or two). However, at least the option being there is always for the best.

Thanks for the comments, guys! Keep 'em coming. I want to hear more from others about this, so I get a better idea of what the right actions/thinking might be.

tfcreate
08-30-2005, 06:19 AM
I've only run into one instance where a cosplayer did not what their pictures posted on the web. Strangely, when I offered to delete the pics, she said to send her copies which I did.

The law says that we have no expectation of privacy when we appear in public. So, legally they're fair game.

Ethically, we not only want to ask their permission, but let them know what your intentions are regarding the photos.

Fro comission work, I do ask for releases if I intend to use the pictures to promote my work and they are compensated accordingly. (Usually a fee of $200.00 plus a percentage per re-print.)

For purposes here, there doens't need to be great concern, because no one seeks profits from the pictures taken.

TFC

jtnishi
08-30-2005, 10:15 AM
The law says that we have no expectation of privacy when we appear in public. So, legally they're fair game.
The problem is what's the definition of "public" in this case. For example, take a situation like Ani-Magic. The convention is held completely on private property (in this case, a hotel). While membership is open to the public, the convention is only open to members. Could this be reasonably construed as a public location for the purposes of appearance in public? I mean, after all, if the hotel said no photography allowed, they'd be within their rights to do so.

While a number of convention centers are owned by (or at least partially owned by) city governments, some are privately owned. So I'm still not 100% sure that legally, one could use arguments about freedom of the press & such on those terms. Do you have any information that could clarify that?

JadeCat
08-31-2005, 11:52 AM
Legally, in any public area, there's no concept of privacy law. You can take photos of anyone w/o any real percussions.

In privately owned areas, hotels, buildings, malls, the laws aren't so liberal.

Ethically, taking a photo for your own private use, esp. w/ verbal consent usually does the trick, and I have yet to meet a cosplayer who minds having their photo taken.

However, if you're planning on showing it in your portfolio or selling it, then it becomes a different matter. If any magazine or stock company wants one of your photos, they are going to ask for a model release.

Normally, I carry around 3x5 cards with a short model release, and let people know I'll use their images in my portfolio or putting it on the net. In the case of underage kids, well, I also have parental consent forms.

It's normally a very quick process, and as part of the model release, I agree to send them a copy of their photo, and there's a spot for their email addresses. I have yet to get any complaints.

Eriol
08-31-2005, 01:40 PM
Agreeing with others...

Cosplayers being photographed have a general expectation that their likenesses will be posted on the Internet and be non-profit in nature. There is also an implicit understanding that if a cosplayer objects to a photo, he or she can ask the photographer to have it removed. I've seen more and more photographers carry business cards to give to their subjects, so there is a way for the subjects to contact the photographers. Despite this, it is still wise to inform the subject of what you intend to do with the photos.

The hotlinking issue is another can of worms. Logically speaking, you, as the copyright holder, probably should be going after those people who hotlinked your images and misappropriated them. Watermarking your images or setting up your server to disable hotlinking are ways to slow down such misappropriation. Subjects being photographed should be informed that images on the web can be hotlinked or copied.

The laws of photography in public and private tend to vary somewhat from state to state, so ideally, you need to consult an attorney in the state you are taking pictures.

jtnishi
08-31-2005, 03:45 PM
Normally, I carry around 3x5 cards with a short model release, and let people know I'll use their images in my portfolio or putting it on the net. In the case of underage kids, well, I also have parental consent forms.


Shoot, I never did think about 3x5 cards. That sounds like an excellent idea! My biggest worry was always about having to carry around a bunch of papers that could easily get lost.

Cosplayers being photographed have a general expectation that their likenesses will be posted on the Internet and be non-profit in nature. There is also an implicit understanding that if a cosplayer objects to a photo, he or she can ask the photographer to have it removed. I've seen more and more photographers carry business cards to give to their subjects, so there is a way for the subjects to contact the photographers. Despite this, it is still wise to inform the subject of what you intend to do with the photos.

Well, your opinion does appear to be the consensus. Since I don't cosplay myself, however, I wanted to make sure that the internet posting stuff was general knowledge. I do carry business cards myself, but I'll admit to being a bit conservative in terms of giving them out. I normally don't go through more than about 10-20 in a year, even though I take pictures of well over 4 times that many costumes/people at any given convention. I'll probably have to rethink my routine a bit.

The hotlinking issues is another can of worms. Logically speaking, you, as the copyright holder, probably should be going after those people who hotlinked your images and misappropriated them. Watermarking your images or setting up your server to disable hotlinking are ways to slow down such misappropriation. Subjects being photographed should be informed that images on the web can be hotlinked or copied.

Well, the watermarking is definitely something we do. I've actually been a bit loathe to deal with disabling hotlinking, even though I know it's the right action, because I'm not completely competent in administering with Apache servers yet, and I can't be 100% sure of the consequences that might happen (for example, breaking a mirror server that I currently use or might use in the future). While we do have a server admin to take care of such things, I figured out a long time ago that it's faster to deal with it myself.

As far as informing subjects that images on the web can be hotlinked or copied, though, wouldn't just the fact that mentioning that images are posted on the internet be enough? I mean, the fact that images on the web can generally be hotlinked or copied is actually within the realm of common knowledge, right? However, given that I don't exactly inform my subjects that I post on the 'net, I suppose that'd be a step in the right direction anyway.

Eriol
08-31-2005, 04:35 PM
Well, your opinion does appear to be the consensus. Since I don't cosplay myself, however, I wanted to make sure that the internet posting stuff was general knowledge. I do carry business cards myself, but I'll admit to being a bit conservative in terms of giving them out. I normally don't go through more than about 10-20 in a year, even though I take pictures of well over 4 times that many costumes/people at any given convention. I'll probably have to rethink my routine a bit.

I guess if a person wanted to be very cautious, that person would be handing out a business card to every subject he or she wants to get a picture. That 10-20 cards per year then becomes 20-100 cards per con.

I know that if a photographer looks like press or from a con report site I am not familiar with, I'd try to get a card or information that I can write down, but that's just me. That is not true for the majority of cosplayers, I feel. I'm a bit more information-hungry. :)

Again, there are many cosplayers who don't ask for a card, so just a verbal agreement is fine.

I also think nowadays, with cosplay.com being as large at it is, many subjects don't ask too much, because they assume the photos will show up on cosplay.com at some point. Not a good assumption for a cosplayer to make, but as the saying goes, "perception is the reality." There is little argument that cosplay.com has achieved popular recognition at many cons, as evidenced by the "cosplay.com" gatherings (even in the program guide!).

I've actually been a bit loathe to deal with disabling hotlinking, even though I know it's the right action, because I'm not completely competent in administering with Apache servers yet, and I can't be 100% sure of the consequences that might happen (for example, breaking a mirror server that I currently use or might use in the future). While we do have a server admin to take care of such things, I figured out a long time ago that it's faster to deal with it myself.

This is something you definitely want to learn from your server admin. Hotlinking uses up your monthly bandwidth allowance, so you don't want other sites draining your site's bandwidth allowance unnecessarily.


As far as informing subjects that images on the web can be hotlinked or copied, though, wouldn't just the fact that mentioning that images are posted on the internet be enough? I mean, the fact that images on the web can generally be hotlinked or copied is actually within the realm of common knowledge, right? However, given that I don't exactly inform my subjects that I post on the 'net, I suppose that'd be a step in the right direction anyway.

I wish it was common knowledge. There are still people who do not understand the Internet concept and how computer files work (more people than you and I think). These misinformed people treat their domain or webpage like a physical piece of real estate and think all their media content is physically locked to that location and can't be moved. These are often the same people, who after finding out the way the Internet really works and having their images copied, start asking about ways to prevent people from hotlinking or copying their images (i.e. They may try things like a Javascript right-click program to prevent people from saving the image, but that won't stop tech-savvy people). There were people on cosplay.com asking these type of questions in the past.

Maybe you don't have to tell them about the hotlinking/copying possibility when you take a subject's picture, because some people may think you are being condescending. That might be too much, but I was only thinking like that in a "cover your bases" maneuver.

-------------------

Back to the original topic...
Personally, I prefer full disclosure. If someone is taking my picture, I would appreciate knowing how it will be used and where I can find it. While the law may side with the photographer, common courtesy is still worth something.

shiroin
08-31-2005, 07:33 PM
i dont know about north america, but in japan no one ever complained.
i have seen gays dressed up as the two main charas of kunadakki no miko (quite known for their les-ness) and theyhad let me take pictures
i have seen boys dressed up in girls, maids or school girls what not, and they let people take pictures

asking before taking pictures is always a good start.

here is my thought:

since we have asked (i hope), they have the option to refuse and to run away while our lens are pointing at them. (hey i have been rejected many times on the streets of harajuku)
but even after the shutters are pressed, they can ask kindly to delete the photos of themselves.

japanese people arnt as keen about all these stupid legal stuff like the people in north america
if japanese people had been keen on copyrights, there would be no doujinshi, and no cosplays!

jtnishi
09-01-2005, 01:32 AM
This is something you definitely want to learn from your server admin. Hotlinking uses up your monthly bandwidth allowance, so you don't want other sites draining your site's bandwidth allowance unnecessarily.

I do actually watch the bandwidth allowance carefully, and at this second, I know more about the controls required than the server admin might (it's mostly done through the nasty Apache module known as mod_rewrite, which is frankly cursed by server admins everywhere, but that's another topic...). I know how I'd need to do it, but the key is that I don't know the side-effects, and I don't think the server admin knows them well either. :-P

I wish it was common knowledge. There are still people who do not understand the Internet concept and how computer files work (more people than you and I think). These misinformed people treat their domain or webpage like a physical piece of real estate and think all their media content is physically locked to that location and can't be moved. These are often the same people, who after finding out the way the Internet really works and having their images copied, start asking about ways to prevent people from hotlinking or copying their images (i.e. They may try things like a Javascript right-click program to prevent people from saving the image, but that won't stop tech-savvy people). There were people on cosplay.com asking these type of questions in the past.

Maybe you don't have to tell them about the hotlinking/copying possibility when you take a subject's picture, because some people may think you are being condescending. That might be too much, but I was only thinking like that in a "cover your bases" maneuver.
Well, I suppose if I were covering my bases, yeah, I'd probably have to state as such. But then again, I have to also make a certain baseline set of assumptions, or else I'd never be able to make a statement ("these pictures are going to be posted on the internet. the internet is a large worldwide network where people can share information. to access the information..."). I was more thinking that hotlinking/copying would almost fall into the side of the information that I'd rather assume was known instead of making known.

asking before taking pictures is always a good start.

here is my thought:

since we have asked (i hope), they have the option to refuse and to run away while our lens are pointing at them. (hey i have been rejected many times on the streets of harajuku)
but even after the shutters are pressed, they can ask kindly to delete the photos of themselves.

japanese people arnt as keen about all these stupid legal stuff like the people in north america
if japanese people had been keen on copyrights, there would be no doujinshi, and no cosplays!

Yeah, true. The whole code of ethics thing is much more implicit in Japan, I can imagine. While I'd like to believe that it works the same way here in the US, I know better, and that's why I ask. Thanks for the perspective, though.

ZiggyB
09-01-2005, 01:38 AM
FYI, I use mod_rewrite to block direct linking on my web site. It's stopped a lot of bandwidth stealing I have to say.

Of course what people do is just save the image, put it on photobucket or some such and continue to bash the pictures. That's going to happen anyway, but at least it's not taking up my bandwidth. :P

IMHO, blocking direct linking outways any downsides it may have.

Oops, this is off topic isn't it. :> Back to photography. :)

Eriol
09-01-2005, 09:54 AM
jtnishi, in most cases, you don't have to worry about telling subjects about hotlinking. Again, while most subjects assume you will put their image on the Internet, it won't hurt to just tell them they are going on the internet and hand them a business card. You'll have to give out more business cards though, so your print budget goes up.
However, you can get free business cards on the net in exchange for allowing the printer to put ads on the back of them. One source of free business cards is Vista Print: http://www.vistaprint.com/vp/ns/default.aspx

I think photographers should probably give more business cards, so subjects can find the photo, and then decide whether they want it taken off the site.

I noticed with Eurobeat King at Otakon 2005 that he actually shows the subject the photo in his camera's LCD to make sure the image is decent. That is a nice gesture, but I'm sure it is time-consuming if you had to do that for each subject.

Also, I forgot to clarify something about mirror sites. A true mirror site houses a complete copy of the site. The fact you were initially afraid of interfering with your mirror sites if you disable hotlinking means you don't really have a true mirror site. You have copies of your web pages, but all the images point back to a central server. If you had a true mirror site, you can disable hotlinking and no site would affect another.

Sorry for going off topic. Maybe the questions of websites should go in the digital workflow thread?

JadeCat
09-01-2005, 06:45 PM
Agreeing with others...

Cosplayers being photographed have a general expectation that their likenesses will be posted on the Internet and be non-profit in nature. There is also an implicit understanding that if a cosplayer objects to a photo, he or she can ask the photographer to have it removed. I've seen more and more photographers carry business cards to give to their subjects, so there is a way for the subjects to contact the photographers. Despite this, it is still wise to inform the subject of what you intend to do with the photos.

Definitely, ethically, I do think it behooves the photographer to tell the subject what they intend to do with the photograph.

But, as mentioned before, if the photograph is taken on, say, a public sidewalk, etc, the photographer has absolutely no obligation to inform the person(s) what they intend to do with that photograph -- journalists do this all the time w/ AP news, etc -- they aren't necessarily getting model releases etc.

If a person decides later they want their photo removed, if they have signed the model release, the photographer doesn't have to abide by their wishes -- said person signed the release, therefore, *legally* the photographer can do what ever they want with that photograph....*ethically* what the photographer does can be subject to interpretation.

Having said that, photographers can also clandestinately take photographs of people -- say you're in costume....sure, people ask to take your photos, but for everyone that asks, there's at least 1 other person who hasn't....either from afar or whatnought. The concept of privacy, except for in your own home, is an almost non-practical idea that really has no notion or legal recourse (except for what happens in your own home) in our court systems or laws.

Anyone who leaves their house really should not have any expectation of their images not being somewhere...whether on the internet or not...and if you're in cosplay or costume somewhere, it because even more so. However, the law becomes tricky when it comes to minors, because of child abuse laws. Parents have the right to demand that their children's images be removed.

I think Cons should really ensure that signs and warnings are always posted about the use of your image being taken...so that in the long run, no one complains.

stefaniecat
09-07-2005, 12:30 PM
This thread is exactally something I've been currious about! Thanks for starting it...

What I'd really like to know, for those of you that use releases (especially the ones on index cards - nice and portable) is what they look like and the wording you use! If you have scans of them or something I'd definitly love to see them, as I do have my own releases but I'm always trying to improve them..

jtnishi
09-08-2005, 09:56 AM
Again, guys, thanks for your input.

stefaniecat, since I don't use model releases yet, I won't speak for the others here. However, I was thinking of using the permission release text at the bottom of http://www.dpcorner.com/all_about/releases2.shtml for such releases, which looks like it would cover the cases I need to use pictures for, and probably would work in informal situations.

tfcreate
09-08-2005, 07:15 PM
Again, guys, thanks for your input.

stefaniecat, since I don't use model releases yet, I won't speak for the others here. However, I was thinking of using the permission release text at the bottom of http://www.dpcorner.com/all_about/releases2.shtml for such releases, which looks like it would cover the cases I need to use pictures for, and probably would work in informal situations.

I use a general release form available just about anywhere.
http://presentsofmind.com/html/photographers%20release.htm

http://www.iancgbell.clara.net/bodyart/modrel.htm

In each instance you substitute your name/company where appropriate.
I've used the second of the 2 for years and it's valid in all 50 states and U.S. Territories.

TFC

stefaniecat
09-13-2005, 12:21 AM
Oh, those are some very useful links... I find that the photos I take may or may not be used beyond a portfolio... and if I do end up wanting to use them for things like stock photography at some point (not my snapshots at cons most likely, but one has to be prepared) then I'll definitly need a bigger index card lol... There was some good legal information listed there that I liked and didn't have on what I currently use...

What I use looks a bit like this:
I hereby consent to and authorize the use and reproduction, in print or on a website, of the following images to Stefanie Short, without compensation. All digital images, negatives, and prints are owned by Stefanie Short who reserves the right to use these photographs in print and electronic publications. I realize that no names of subjects will be published with the photographs.

Photo Names/Descriptions:
Date Taken:
Childís Name:
Parentís Name:
Signature: Date: