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View Full Version : Deciding on Poses...by the Photographer, or You?


Crystalike
10-01-2005, 07:28 PM
Hello all, I've been photographed a few times at some cons, but I never know whether I should tell the photographer how I want to pose in my pictures.

Is it YOU or the PHOTOGRAPHER who decides on how you pose in your costumes and photos?

In one incident I remember is how the photographer and I were standing around, wasting time trying to decide what poses I should do, and we wasted 15 min. like that...so, is the cosplayer supposed to tell the photographer what angle, this closeup, with the focus on the prop, etc?

One more point I have is that the photographer may not know much about your character, and may simply want a photo of the costume, not caring much about how you pose. But telling the person how to take your pictures would seem a little bossy, and so...what do you guys think? ^_^

Kaze no Yume
10-01-2005, 08:34 PM
Although telling them what to do might be a little bossy, but it is perfectly understandable. You didn't make the costume of a certain character for nothing. Most of us here either loved the character or the costume and how to pose is definitely related to how you show the character or the costume. So, on the note of being too bossy, I think most photographers wouldn't mind. Their goal is to to take nice pictures, after all.

Or, you can also insist to do a pose first, then let the photographer decide whether to take photos of other poses.

One important thing is to let them know that they can take more than just one picture, so if you decide one pose it would be ok.

shiroin
10-01-2005, 10:05 PM
well... im more like a beginner when it comes to cosplay photography... and i dont know about sitituations in North American cons, but then here are some of my experiences.

In Japan, what often happens is this:
http://www.deviantart.com/view/22102502/
http://www.deviantart.com/view/22384600/

you get like dozens of people photographing few cosplayers
most of the times these cosplayers would jst do their own pose (and they are good at them) and sometimes people would ask them to pose.
but since there is a large number of photographers, they would often ask the cosplayers to look at their camera for the sake for better photographs.
also often photographers would bring samirai swords, model firearms, guitars and other items for the cosplayers to pose with.

sometimes cosplayers in japan even do erotic poses volunteerly XD
http://www.deviantart.com/view/22102630/
http://www.deviantart.com/view/22102642/

skypirate
10-01-2005, 10:22 PM
One more point I have is that the photographer may not know much about your character, and may simply want a photo of the costume, not caring much about how you pose. But telling the person how to take your pictures would seem a little bossy, and so...what do you guys think? ^_^

Quickest answer?
When a photographer asks if they can take your photo, simply ask if they would like more than one pose. viola!

KawaiiEdea
10-01-2005, 10:42 PM
Quickest answer?
When a photographer asks if they can take your photo, simply ask if they would like more than one pose. viola!

That's a good point, because I've been asked to be photographed before and I wasn't sure (after a longer than normal pause..) whether to strike a different pose or not @_@ I'll make it point to ask next time I'm at a con! :D

tfcreate
10-01-2005, 11:02 PM
If this is a paid model, then I call the shots... end of story.
He/she is only bound by what is ethical and what is legal.

If it's a con shot, everything is gratis, then the cosplayer can call the shots...
I make recomendations based on the environment and my expierence, but all in all they get to say yes or no.

If it's a favor to the cosplayer (I want some pics for myself sort of thing)
Then it's their game all the way. I agreed to do it, so I have to live with the consequences. Again, I can recommend, but not command. But I too am bound by what is legal and ethical, because you won't believe the kind of pictures you get asked to do.

TFC

Hikaruchan
10-01-2005, 11:36 PM
As a photographer, for conshots I usually let the cosplayer choose the pose - only asking them to change if I spot things like they are blocking face with something. If I really like the costume and have time (and memory/batteries), may ask them if they would do another pose or if I could take another angle of pose doing.

cold kittn
10-02-2005, 12:12 AM
As a attendie and fellow cosplayer, when I ask to take pictures of other cosplayers I let them chose the pose. Only once have I told someone to do something and that's because they wouldn't fit in the shot. I study character poses so when people ask for my picture it'll be recognizable.

Captain Gundam
10-02-2005, 01:57 AM
I let the cosplayer decide. I dont want them to be in a pose that they dont like. I barely say what pose he/she/they be in. It's up to them not me. i dont make anything out of it, i just take pics for fun and get some experience with taking pictures.

TomodachiFriend
10-02-2005, 02:33 AM
Some cosplayers don't know how to pose and they'll ask the photographer, which is great because it often comes out silly most of the time.

Forcebewitya
10-02-2005, 03:34 AM
I dont always know how to pose but I have never been asked to do a certain pose other than put my arm around someone.

Forcebewitya.

Tenchan
10-02-2005, 07:52 AM
For my part, that depends on the purpose of the photo. If it is a photo to specifically show off my costume and how I hold myself in it, I will chose the poses, end of story. It is my costume, after all.
If it is, however, a photo that is, say, supposed to be a memory of the con or of my attendance there, then I will trust a good photographer to be able to put me in the best light.

Tenshi
10-02-2005, 11:54 AM
I like it when photographers give me a little direction. After all, I can't really see what I'm doing, and they can. They might also have ideas I never thought of or didn't want to do originally. While wearing Sailor Uranus, I really didn't want to do a World Shaking-type pose because I thought it always looked silly. But my friends convinced me to do it, and now it's one of my favorite pictures of the costume ^^;;.

So as long as they're not suggesting anything lewd or rude, directions from photogs are a good thing :).

Kokuu
10-02-2005, 01:42 PM
As someone who both photographs and cosplays, I think it should be a team effort. When I photograph I'll let the cosplayer choose their pose, but I'll then make suggestions on how to fix it if their pose covers up their face, takes up too much room, doesn't look very flattering... Since I also like to take multiple photos, I'll suggest poses, since many cosplayers don't have more then one pose (Which you should! Always practice at least three or four poses per costume!). When I'm being photographed, I love getting suggestions from the photographer, since I don't know exactly what he has in mind as far as composition goes (every photographer has their own style) and I don't know how I look from the camera side of things. My favorite photograph (the one I made my avatar out of) was done on suggestion by a photographer.

Yueri
10-02-2005, 05:10 PM
Once upon a time some uy asked me for a picture and I posed, then later he told me "ok, now one normal" I felt kinda ridiculuos and just stood there looking bored.

I realized just them some so called "photographers" dont care about the posesm they just want a pic of our boobs *stare*

tfcreate
10-02-2005, 07:46 PM
Remember, most photographers won't know many of the charaters that they photograph, so they have to trust in the models to supply some of the signature poses of the charater.
TFC

Crystalike
10-02-2005, 07:58 PM
whoaa, i didn't expect so many replies! ^_^ thanks to you all!

i'll keep in mind to ask the photographer if he/she wants signature poses, as well as favorite ones practiced in the mirror. =D

Sleepy
10-03-2005, 07:51 PM
From my experience I find that I usually don't need to ask for a pose. I work with what the cosplayer gives me. I then work in placing myself into finding the best angle for the shot. Because if I ask them to shift around too much, then ususally the composition of the image I saw initially changes. I also found myself at Ani-magic, asking the cosplayer to try a different pose, if I knew that it wasn't going to turn out good. They always find one eventually.

Crystalike
10-03-2005, 10:34 PM
hmm, i see...but what if the cosplayer insists on just his/her own poses and the photographer wants to try different ones, so they don't see eye to eye?

Drngd Kreationz
10-03-2005, 10:53 PM
I think it's a combination effort. I don't bother much with con photography but when I was doing my shoot the more communication I had with the model opened up more poses, and different variations of said poses. being able to hear what the model wants to see.. and then combining it with my style or whatever creative impulse i get and being able to communicate that to the model helps get the shoot going better.

Captain Gundam
10-03-2005, 11:10 PM
When it comes taking pics at cons, for me I just go with the cosplayer's choice since it makes it more unique but time to time I'll make a suggestion to alter it (like copying a battle or a fight scene or group shot with others etc). I prefer to take pics the way they come out unless I take a bad shot or something.

shiroin
10-04-2005, 02:00 AM
If the cosplayers know that their picture is going to appear somewhere, they should be prepared pose and expect what they will see in photographs of themselves.

When I was in cons in Japan, most cosplayers seemed to be prepared to do poses. Especially signature ones.

Here are some signature poses.

http://www.deviantart.com/view/22102573/
http://www.deviantart.com/view/22102615/

JadeCat
10-04-2005, 02:12 PM
There is a particular art to "posing", of which many photographers take classes.

And unless the photographer is a serious portrait photographer, s/he may not know how to pose you.

And if they aren't familiar w/ your character, they aren't going to know how best to pose you in a signature character pose.

If you know your character, then go ahead and strike whatever pose you feel would be a good photo. If the photographer asks you to pose or gives you direction, then feel free to take their advice unless it makes you uncomfortable.

Sweet~Pea
10-04-2005, 04:20 PM
When I take photos of cosplayers at cons, I let them do their own poses, but if I'm doing a shoot for someone I do tell them how to pose for some photos. It's usually only for friends, so they're comfortable with me directing them. If I don't know the character very well it's a bit more difficult. In that case, I would have them pose and then adjust them a bit to make it a better shot.

Crystalike
10-04-2005, 07:22 PM
aha, but there is also the problem of if the photographer is in a hurry and does not care what kind of a pose, just *click then runs off. ^_^;

Bandit64
10-04-2005, 07:45 PM
I don't typically watch that much anime, just a few particular shows(One Piece, Great Teacher Onizuka, blah blah), so to be honest I don't know many of the charcters that people dress up as.

I would assume that someone that went to the effort of making a costume would have a few poses down that the character typically does, and it works out quite well for the most part. I didn't even ask a single person to pose at Wizard World Boston, they generally knew what they were doing.

If someone asks for my advice, I'll give them some. But since I'm not really shooting for portfolio material at cons, I'd prefer to give the cosplayer what they want.

shiroin
10-05-2005, 02:29 AM
while browsing a Taiwanese site on COMIKET 67 cosplay photos, I came accross some really nice poses. This should be a good reference for cosplayers and photographers.

This pose really caught my attention http://www.memory-off.org/comiket65/imagepages/image292.htm

SpookyElectric
10-06-2005, 05:33 AM
I'm going to add my "me too" to it being a combined effort. The cosplayer usually leads, but the photographer has input too.

As a cosplayer, I have some poses, but usually not very inventive ones, so I'm happy to take some direction when given it. Also, I think a few times I've suggested stuff to the photographer.
As a photographer, I realize most cosplayers have spent some time thing of poses, so usually they pose, and I just pick the angle and framing. If they suggest anything from me (don't think that's happened), then I'd try it out. And if I have ideas that I think are cool, I'll take their own pose first, then ask about the alternative. If the cosplayer likes the idea, I take the picture, if they're not interested, then that's that.

But a key point is to make suggestions, like "What about putting your hand on your side?" not corrections, like "It would be better if you had your hand on your side."

SkippingSith
10-06-2005, 11:57 AM
Cosplayers should practice some standard "character" poses (victory poses, frequently seen artbook/anime shots, etc), but if the photographer wants a certain pose that the cosplayer feels comfortable doing, then let them at it. Like Spooky said, if the cosplayer is not comfortable doing a particular pose, then they don't have to. Ask. The worst that could happen is either party could say no.

tfcreate
10-08-2005, 10:48 PM
The only thing that will REALLY drive me up the wall is BAD POSTURE. That's about the only thing I'll harp on a cosplayer about. So, call me an old lady, but I've seen alot of well constructed, well fitted costumes look like utter crap because the model hadn't learned how to walk/stand upright!!!
AAARRRGGGHHH!!!!!
TFC

Crystalike
10-09-2005, 12:22 AM
ah yes, the bad posture...ick. but some costumes are really heavy or uncomfortable to pose in, that is a problem, but what can you do about it? ^_^;

CelestialAurora
10-09-2005, 12:41 AM
well, the problem that i have is thinking up poses. i don't know which poses to do. i usually go with the whole praying thing depending on the character. anyways, usually, i pick the pose. but i've come upon a few photographers that want me in a specific area or doing a certain pose. then, i usually do what they say.

tfcreate
10-09-2005, 01:39 PM
It takes 1/60 of a second to take a picture. Surely they can stand up straight for that brief fraction of a second. Besides, I would hope that the costume maker would have taken comfort into account. I'd hate to think that they did all of that work just to be miserable.
TFC

Crystalike
10-09-2005, 11:11 PM
haha, that's true...

Celestial Aurora; have you tried doing stupid poses? ;P for example; Belldandy doing a cartwheel? XD sometimes, more attention is recieved if you act the total opposite of the character that you're dressed up as.

shiroin
10-09-2005, 11:44 PM
silly and erotic poses does recieve much attention :p

CosplayerGabi
10-10-2005, 01:49 PM
I'll have one pose ready for you all the time but after that I'm never sure what looks right so I'll gladly take direction from a trusted photographer. After all, they can see what it looks like, I can't.
I actually do have a good side, I know the rules about looking thinner, how to increase or decrease your eyes. But I never know which smile looks right, if I tilted my head too much or if my hand looks strangely posed. So al always welcome advice.

Now when I am taking the photos after 1-2 photos I go ahead and give some direction. My amature eyes were given a gift for compostion so I know how to fill and tilt and such. I just wish I could interpret my poses into what it will look like before the shutter clicks.
So if I'm the subject on film I always like to take LOTS of photos of a costume. Out of the 20 I take 3 will look decent and one will look cool. Yay digital camera!

Crystalike
10-10-2005, 08:11 PM
ohh, i wish i had an 'eye' for composition...maybe that's my problem...

tfcreate
10-10-2005, 08:56 PM
I just like the pictures where the cosplayers are just having fun. They sometimes don't like that, but the silly pictures are the most fun. I never take or ask for erotic pics. They just rub me the wrong way... (no pun intended.)
TFC

Efecss
10-11-2005, 07:59 AM
Wow, this is all good advice. I haven't seen one thing that really needs to be modified, or countered.

Ihave been taking pictures at conventions for over 20 years. And I took several courses in photography and vidography at a local college. While I like to "make" the picture, instead of waiting for the picture to happen, in this case, letting the picture happen is basically the only thing you can do.

I think we all realize that the general nature of a convention can ruine a picture you are trying so hard to get, unless you are in a "controlled" setting. Meaning a photo gathering. Just general a picture can be ruined when a mass of photographers come up and start popping their flashes and you had your settings all made out...

But, in posing..... I think we all agree that this has to be a colaborative effort on the part of the cosplayer and the photographer. The cosplayer should have some idea of a pose to present when asked for a picture.

I, myself, take things as they come. Sometimes, you can only get a "standard pose" from someone, because you are in a high traffic area, or either you or they are tired, or they are rushing to some place. Still, try to make use of the time.

By nature, a cosplayer is an exhibitionist (To a point.) Some do really get into their character and know each signature pose, move, or stance they make. If you look at my gallery, where my recent pictures of Saber are (My TRANSFORMER/Mecha file), you will see that I am in the stance of the character as he appears on the booklet that comes with all of that year's TRANSFORMER characters. Kind of like a checklist. I had two other poses from the TV show that I had ready, but I thought that this was the best. And as the Wizard of Speed and time, I did this flamboyant pose that Mike did in a couple of scenes from his movie.

Ofcourse, I was prepared to take other poses if asked, but no one did. I guess they liked what I did enough. (But then again, probably didn't care.) But, I knew my characters.

Now, for my picture taking. It usually takes me a minute to calculate my flash if I need to. I am pretty good a judging distance, and setting my flash/iris just so... Accept for pictures from BayCon, I have not had too much problems with lighting.

Posing, again, usually its on the fly. But I have come in on a group of others taking pictures. Instead of a gang flash, I will wait and bide my time to get the perfect shot. So far, I have not been really disappointed.

Getting back on track... Sometimes you want to use a setting of some sort, some people will gladly go with you, but more often than not, they won't want to go to the other side of the hotel. I try to use what is around. I sometimes get on rocks, tables, chairs, walls now-a-days to get different angles. I have even laid down on the ground.

Let me illustrate this in a way from a quick thing I did at Ani-magic this year. I got a chance to take some pictures with Yaya Han while she was in her Felicia costume. basically I got in on the tail end of the initial foto flurry. (This was the first time I had ever met her.) I had gotten a few shots, and even a couple of high shots by holding up my camera. So now I descided to get a couple of low shots. I sat down on the ground and took a few shots. Finally, being the only one left, I asked her to lunge at me, like she was going to attack. It took a bit of prodding and direction to get the picture. But I think I got it. (Still haven't developed any of the 14 rolls.)

Also, another situation later that day, I was walking back from the convention center to the hotel area, near the pool, and came across this girl with a samurai sword, wearing a schoolgirl outfit. (Not a sailor suit, more like a senior girl outfit.) Anyway, there was a rock near by, and I asked her to pose with one foot on the rock, and one hand on the hilt. She did. Then I asked her to sit on the rock, and hold the sword a certain way, and look as if she were contemplating the sword.

Mind you, there were about ten people starting to congregate around, so I tried to do this quickly before the moment was lost. I took one with flash, and one without flash, because the sun was starting to set behind her, and it cast a shadow on her, and a golden radiance on her skin that would take studio lights to do any better.

She was willing to do this, and I hope it turns out great.

But, if she was not, I would have stepped back, and left well enough alone.

A photographer has to have the artistic eye to assess a situation within a blink of an eye, and the model has to be willing to go along with it. And if your subject is not willing to go along with it, no matter what you do, you will never get the shot you want, or one that will look good.

And if a model suggests something, I am perfectly willing to go along with it. Wheather I will waste a frame for it is another matter.

I hope this does help. I know I went on kind of long, and reading this as I did, makes it look like I kind of went around in circles.....

Efecss
10-11-2005, 08:10 AM
I just like the pictures where the cosplayers are just having fun. They sometimes don't like that, but the silly pictures are the most fun. I never take or ask for erotic pics. They just rub me the wrong way... (no pun intended.)
TFC

I agree. If THEY, themselves, do something like that is one thing. But asking for something like that it kind of invites problems from other sources.

I would not have a problem asking: "Do you think you could so a pinup-like pose for me." But only if I know that I would not overly offend them. And I have asked a couple of girls before, and only one ever did. (I have no idea where that picture is, it was sooo long ago...)

But, I am sure that we all agree on. Ask, but if they say no, never bring it up again.

Crystalike
10-13-2005, 12:34 AM
you, are the man! that is what i wanted to hear, and i highly appreciate all of your insight! <3 this is going to help soooo much at future cons. i will no long be the photographer's puppet, but shall be free! (to an extent, of course).

Efecss
10-13-2005, 02:14 AM
you, are the man! that is what i wanted to hear, and i highly appreciate all of your insight! <3 this is going to help soooo much at future cons. i will no long be the photographer's puppet, but shall be free! (to an extent, of course).


Good. Just remember, you are not being paid for this, so you have every right to refuse a suggested pose, or even refuse to be photographed by any photographer you don't feel right with.


(See you at a convention sometime soon...)

In Addendem: This post got me to thinking. And I am also on a cosplay photography yahoo group, and we have been talking about having panels on cosplayers posing and such, and photographer etiquette.

Well, I have descided to make a small book on this. (More of a booklet.) from this subject, and put an article in my cosplay zine.

Crystalike
10-14-2005, 10:53 PM
wow! i would SO go to one of those panels, if you guys make them! photographer etiquette is a MUST TO KNOW, as it's quite annoying to have a couple guys try to take pics of only the areas they prefer...*like the legs...O_O; it amazes me how so many people see cosplay as an opportunity to take pics of chicks in strange costumes and not as a modern art form...~_~ really...

Efecss
10-15-2005, 03:47 AM
wow! i would SO go to one of those panels, if you guys make them! photographer etiquette is a MUST TO KNOW, as it's quite annoying to have a couple guys try to take pics of only the areas they prefer...*like the legs...O_O; it amazes me how so many people see cosplay as an opportunity to take pics of chicks in strange costumes and not as a modern art form...~_~ really...

In a way, I have had the same problem with "Photo snipers." People who just take your picture on the fly, without asking. Then I find that they posted me when I was in my Optimus Prime costume at Comic-Con, and called me "Fat Optimus" on their website. (Even though I have had the best Optimus Prime costume by far, for hall wear.

If I had a Megatron costume, I would have a hoarde of female fans following me. (Some have even said so...)

inertia
10-15-2005, 12:16 PM
As a cosplayer I have some standard poses but I really appreciate getting input and suggestions from photographers. If my arm is too close to my body and it's making the silhouette bulky, I'd like to know. If my head should be tilted differently because of shadows, please tell me. I don't like the thought of people going home with bad photos of me and I can't see what it looks like from the photographer's perspective, so if there's something I can do to improve the picture I'd like to hear about it.

Most of the serious amateur Japanese photographers I've worked with are very helpful and polite. They'll begin by saying they'd like to take a certain number of photos, and asking if that's okay. Usually it's a combination of standard and suggested poses. If the photographer has a digital camera I like to look at how the pictures are coming along, and if I see that a particular pose he suggested seems to work especially well I'll add it to my list in future.

Efecss
10-15-2005, 06:11 PM
As a cosplayer I have some standard poses but I really appreciate getting input and suggestions from photographers. If my arm is too close to my body and it's making the silhouette bulky, I'd like to know. If my head should be tilted differently because of shadows, please tell me. I don't like the thought of people going home with bad photos of me and I can't see what it looks like from the photographer's perspective, so if there's something I can do to improve the picture I'd like to hear about it.

Most of the serious amateur Japanese photographers I've worked with are very helpful and polite. They'll begin by saying they'd like to take a certain number of photos, and asking if that's okay. Usually it's a combination of standard and suggested poses. If the photographer has a digital camera I like to look at how the pictures are coming along, and if I see that a particular pose he suggested seems to work especially well I'll add it to my list in future.

I did have this hapen to me once in Anaheim, while wearing my Metalhawk costume at BotCon. The vendors from Japan went bezerk when they saw me, and all had to have pitcutres of me (I even got one in the Japan BotCon program book.) I gave a couple of poses in what I have seen on the box and the commercials. But, they knew the character better, since they had seen the whole MASTERFORCE series. But then, their english wasn't very good, so it took a while for me to get what they wanted.

What I think needs to be the main thrust of this thread, is that everyone should have atleast a set of three standard poses that are signature to the character they are portraying, and maybe three others which are standad modeling.

And yes, if the photographer has a suggestion, do listen. But don't be a "rag doll", or do anything you would feel really demeans you, or undermines your characer.

Updating: This picture is kind of what I was talkint bout....: http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=520916

Keshi
11-11-2005, 03:45 AM
If a photgrapher at a convention asked me to pose, it would depend for me on the character I was playing. ^^ If I were cosplaying Chii (with my little basket of cakes :D), I'd probably pretend to offer him a cake. Or some other cute pose. =D I try to imitate real poses to compare how well the cosplay turned out. =3

'Noa
11-11-2005, 05:00 PM
When I went to take piccies at last year's CNAnime, I know I had no clue how to direct them. I just wanted a piccie of their pretty costumes ^_^; I'd just move around to get a good angle. I'd leave most of it to the cosplayer, but if I know enough about the character I may ask for a specific pose. I'll have to remember to think of poses if I ever manage to cosplay ^__^;

Evolution
11-15-2005, 12:52 PM
You rock for starting this Crystal...

I HATE being told to pose a certain way even though it suits my character...I'll naturally be a good sport and let them have a pic of a character specific pose, since it's their camera; BUT if multiple photos are being taken at different times, then by God, I'll start choosing my own poses...

Hence my doing wrestling poses in almost ALL of the photos on my gallery...

However, the photo subject can be headstrong as well. I know a person like that. There was a photo shoot for people in costume, just to see how they looked in costume for like an art school or something, and all she could do was rife on about how the poses the person was taking "weren't things my character would do in real-life." REAL LIFE?! ACK...

Long story short: I'll be a good sport and give you the photo you want, unless you want a lot of them, then I take it upon myself to be original. The same should be expected when I'm behind the camera taking the shots...

Crystalike
11-15-2005, 09:44 PM
XDD I should have known you would find this thread...XDD

But that is true, some photographers want really weird poses, and some want the subject to be perfectly in character...>_> ^_^;

'Real Life'....oh boy....

*Shiva*
11-15-2005, 09:55 PM
For con photos, I generally have a bunch of poses planned (or the group does) so that I can quickly come up with something.

For photoshoots, however, for me its usually a collaboration between the photographer and myself. I will have some ideas ready to go, but then some will come to me as the shoot goes on, and my photographer will suggest something if she gets an idea while shooting. Sometimes, we look at a digital shot through the camera, and it gives one of us an idea of how to make it better.

Crystalike
11-15-2005, 10:00 PM
How long are photoshoots? ^_^ I'm interested in having one, (not at a con), but at a professional photographer's...

*Shiva*
11-16-2005, 01:33 AM
I think it depends on the photographer and how much you are willing to pay. But mine are unlimited, since my Mom, my roomate, or myself with a timer are my three photographers, and are quite handy with the camera. I'd say photoshoots with them last somewhere around an hour.

Mina-chan
11-16-2005, 08:48 PM
I usually try to plan out at least five poses for a character that I can rotate around for different pictures. It would look a bit boring if I continually did the same pose for all the pictures ( Especially since Eurobeat King likes to take more than one picture! D: ). At photoshoots, it's really hard to have things planned beforehand; many poses/picture ideas are spontaneous and depend on how many people show up, and what characters are actually there. If you're planning on walking around a con with a group of people, it's nice to test out the poses before going to the convention. <3

staereo
11-17-2005, 12:23 AM
I'd say between 2 and 4 hours. It really depends on the model's stamina. It depends on what you are asking the model to do, how demanding and specific you are about getting certain details just right.

A given 'look' is easily an hour. You figure that it takes a few minutes to set up lights and backgrounds for the look. Then a break between.

And prices for photographers are all over the board. Look through the individuals portfolio, because price does not equate to skill. Remember that a portfolio is full of the pictures they want you to see, so if you see a bunch of things you dont like in those photos, you probably will see the same if they shoot you.

A great photographer, with a great portfolio, and a resume, wil likely cost you money. They've been doing it a while, and it's clear your results will be up to par.

Theres also photographers with giant portfolios that are full of pictures that arent great. They could charge a lot to try to make money, but it doesnt make them good.

Theres also photographers that are up and coming, that would take pictures for free for the rights to use the pictures in their portfolio. They all this 'time for prints' or 'time for cd/dvd', etc. Your time as a model, and they give you prints or a cd of the final images for you to have. There are websites to look at a bunch of photographers portfolios, and they are not hard to find. I'm not sure the rules for sharing websites of this type on this forum, so I won't put the links here. If you have trouble finding them, PM me.

No matter what photographer you go with, ensure that you have an escort, or chaperone, go with you to ensure your safety or to stand in if you are asked to do things that you'd rather not. At LEAST for your first meeting. Safety is key, even when dealing with professionals. Obviously the escort shouldnt impede the good type of photography, or cause distraction, but outside of this occuring, I dont know any photographer that would have a problem with this. If they do, approach it with a questioning attitude.

Bruce

Crystalike
11-17-2005, 11:57 PM
Thank you! ^_^ This is all very helpful information! =D

I had the strange image that photoshoots were somewhat like school ID Pictures...you go in, sit down, smile, and get out. ^_^;;;

staereo
11-18-2005, 11:19 AM
That might be a possibility, I'm not sure.

Most of the photographers I know, myself included, would probably prefer a more in depth shoot. This allows for changes in lighting, look fixes, and different props. I'm sure it would all depend on the setting.

If you were in a group of people at a shoot, there would be less time spent on each model, or cosplayer as it may be, and you may rotate through the group in an hour or two. But that would be a less personal experience and the photos would be a little less differentiating.

On average, though, I think you'd find that a photoshoot is far less 'cookie-cutter' in nature than ID pictures. And this is a good thing. XD

Good luck!
Bruce

Efecss
11-18-2005, 06:11 PM
I took a look at your profile, Chrystalike, to kind of see where you were.

San Jose.

If you want to really learn about what photographers really think, and other things like that, the convention to go to is BAYCON (Which, is unfortunately the same date as Fanime) But, that is where most of the real photographers go. And I am not talking aobut fan phtogs... I mean people who are true, award winning photojournalists. There are several people who have worked for the LA Times and National Geographic that go to this convention because they like it.

There is usally some sort of photo panel going on. But, from the sounds of things on a costume photography ML on yahoo, it sounds like they may not be doing stuff like that.

Cicada
11-21-2005, 07:36 PM
so, is the cosplayer supposed to tell the photographer what angle, this closeup, with the focus on the prop, etc?
i think poses should be decided by the cosplayer, but as far as angle,focus, etc...that should be decided by the photographer, after all, it IS their shot, their vision, their...whatever.

of course, if you want a certain shot with a specific angle/focus/etc that you want for yourself, i'm sure most photographers wouldn't mind fulfilling your request. :)

Efecss
11-21-2005, 09:21 PM
i think poses should be decided by the cosplayer, but as far as angle,focus, etc...that should be decided by the photographer, after all, it IS their shot, their vision, their...whatever.

of course, if you want a certain shot with a specific angle/focus/etc that you want for yourself, i'm sure most photographers wouldn't mind fulfilling your request. :)

I would. I'm always up for something like this...

Crystalike
11-21-2005, 11:24 PM
But average photographers wouldn't know how to use those elements correctly, right? Usually they just want a quick picture of the costume, or of a cute person...-__-;

Baycon...I prefer Fanime, but Baycon may be a possibility next year, and I'm sure that before that, I will have some knowledge about photography. ^_^

tfcreate
11-21-2005, 11:43 PM
Remember, the cosplayer can still say no. If you aren't comfortable with the photographer, then walk away from the situation. I try to note the cosplayer's comfort level. If he or she is more than alittle nervous, then I try to settle them down... (you'd be surprised how much a joke or two helps.) Remember, if it's too much like work, then nobody's going to want to take pictures. And unless you know the photographer well, there should be no private sessions.
TFC

Efecss
11-22-2005, 01:33 AM
But average photographers wouldn't know how to use those elements correctly, right? Usually they just want a quick picture of the costume, or of a cute person...-__-;

Baycon...I prefer Fanime, but Baycon may be a possibility next year, and I'm sure that before that, I will have some knowledge about photography. ^_^

Well, it all depends.

I usually find I only have a minute or two before a gaggle of photographers gather around someone I am taking picture of. If I feel I can get a better picture, or a "certain" picture, or if I didn't like that picture for one reason or another, I will ask for it.

But, for your first statement, I will have to say it's about 60% true. But then, we are talking about a visual media, where the look is just as important as the whole set up. But, this is where we are coming into personal preferance.

I fina anime conventions are a bit too crowded for taking pictures, while conventions like BayCon and WorldCon you can have more leaway for setting up the picture you want.

But, also, if you are talking about taking pictures of children 8 and under, who don't really understand about posing, you kind of have to take what you get because they just don't fully understand about posing yet.

And for your last paragraph. Taking some photography classes might be helpful. I found my picture taking vastly improved when I got my hands dirty developing picture and learning about composition.

I took both video and photo classes at Butte College. I would have interned, but I was taking classes 4 days a week, and was away from home 12 hours a day, living nearly 70+ miles from the school, with no car. (Had to take the bus.)

But, getting back on subject, the three classes you want to really take are black and white photography, photojournalsm, and commercial photography. (Ofcourse color, but that goes without saying.)

I took commerical photography, and got to work with a multi-plane camera with 4x5 film (I loved that.) And I have some of my work up on my gallery that I printed (Processing the prints with chemicals, pre-digital.)

Joe

If I make it over to BayCon, and you do to, this year. I'll have you talk with Raven. And also Paul Crist-Picket, who is not only a Master costumer, but a former stuntwoman and actress.

JEE

archangeli
11-22-2005, 10:58 AM
One thing to remember is that you cannot see what the photographer is seeing. Sometimes a photographer will ask you to sit, stand or turn in a way that feels unnatural, but looks really good on film.

As a cosplayer, it does help to practice a bit in the mirrpr ahead of time to know what does work for your costume and what doesn't.

Dewy
11-22-2005, 01:10 PM
I think the photographer should let the cosplayers pose how they like first, and then if they want to adjust it if or take another shot of a different pose pose after they can do that. Is annoying when photographers tell you what to do before you even get a chance to pose how you like. ^^; I do like direction after though...

Edit: Expecially if the photographer knows nothing about the anime and tries to pose you out of character. o.O

Efecss
11-22-2005, 05:57 PM
One thing to remember is that you cannot see what the photographer is seeing. Sometimes a photographer will ask you to sit, stand or turn in a way that feels unnatural, but looks really good on film.

As a cosplayer, it does help to practice a bit in the mirrpr ahead of time to know what does work for your costume and what doesn't.

Dewy:I think the photographer should let the cosplayers pose how they like first, and then if they want to adjust it if or take another shot of a different pose pose after they can do that. Is annoying when photographers tell you what to do before you even get a chance to pose how you like. ^^; I do like direction after though...

Wow, I think these two statements crystilize the very nature of this thread.

Sometimes you have to realize that the photographer may see something different through the camera than what you think. But also, that they may be focussed ont he subject matter, and not realize what is going on in the background. (I have had a few pictures, where I didn't see the line of a post, or what is on it. Or see someone passing inback of a girl, and getting a quick peek at their backside.

Or in this one picture of a ninja lady I took waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaayyyyyyy back in 1991, where she was standing in a creek, and in the upper most corner, you can see three kids on bikes looking down as she's standing there with a bo staff in her hand.

I do like to have the models pose in their character poses for me first, then I ask them to do something else. But, if I find something that is endemic to the character. Like this one girl, to pose withher sword while sitting on a rock at Ani-magic, I would ask her if she would.

Like, with Yaya Han, I just looked at the pictures I took of her in her Felicia costume. I got into the phtogropher's melee . But, afterwards, she kind of focused on me, and I asked her to do some downward swipes at me. She seemed very glad to do it.

I wish I had asked her to do a long exposre shot, where she would stand still, and move one arm in a swiping motion. the blurred effect would have looked like Felicia's attack on the game.

DarkenedWings
11-22-2005, 07:07 PM
I actually like it when photographers give me some direction. I usually have one or two default poses, and if they want more, I ask for help because I usually can't come up with one right on the spot.

To those of you who have problem thinking of even one pose: get in costume at your house or friend's house or someplace where you're comfortable, and practice in front of a mirror. Trust me, it works really well and you can think up something that looks really cool. Try and get into character. As cliche as it sounds, be one with your cosplay. Screenshots and official art can help you get some ideas, too.

As an example, I cosplay Sasuke from Naruto a lot. Some poses are inappropriate (i.e. Sasuke holding up a victory sign might only be if we were doing a silly shot), but he has a few signature stances that I use and have practiced in my room in front of my mirror. I pose like a ninja, basically. As if I were about to throw a kunai, or get into a fight, etc.