PDA

View Full Version : Ettiquette


Efecss
10-15-2005, 08:25 PM
I thought this would be the best time, from a precious thread (http://forums.cosplay.com/showthread.php?t=69066) to see how everyone feels about ettiquette.

I have been phtographed by what I call "Photo snipers" who just jump right infront of you and take your picture, then are gone without saying as much as a thank you.

Some of them I have found on the web with demeaning sayings attached to them. Some calling me "Fat Optimus", with a picture of me with my helmet off, walking around Comic-Con... (I may not be Steve Stunning, but still, there is only so far you can go....)

Part of the statement from the previous thread I mentioned, was about her posing, or having the photographer pose her himself.

Basically, what I am asking is like this:

Some cosplayers find a costume and say: "I like this!", get a few pictures of the character, make the costume and have no idea what show its from, or what the character's personality is like. Should a cosplayer have a prepared set of poses that are signature to the character?

Also, Should the cosplayer be open to posing or doing actions which the photographer wants, without being demeaning, and have the right to say no at any time.

For the Photographer. Should they follow the course of common courtesey for taking pictures. And would it be impropper for them to ask for a "cheesecake" pose when applicable. (I won't go any farther than that.)

And do you think it's propper for anyone to just come up and take a picture and walk away.

Feel free to expand on this. Or give your feelings on this.

When I ask to take a picture. I wait politely if they are talking to someone. Most of the time they will forget you if you interrupt them. I ask for a picture. Usually the people I go to know how to pose, so I don't have much of a problem there.

If I feel another pose is warrented, I will ask them to turn, or make a guesture or whatever. After tht is done, I thank them. And I hand them business card, offering them a copy of the picture at cost.

I have asked a few ladies for cheesecake pictures. Nothing demeaning. Maybe something "poster-like". Or with their back towards me, and looking over their shoulder. Most are not adverse to it, but when they say no, that's it for me.

Kyuriko
10-15-2005, 11:18 PM
I think that the cosplayer should be able to do the poses that both they want to do and the photographer likes them to do, but that they reserve the right to refuse a pose or to have their picture taken at all, for whatever reason. Sometimes it is better if the photographer asks them to do a certain pose (as long as it's appropriate and doesn't make the cosplayer feel uncomfortable) if the cosplayer is cosplaying a character they don't know very well, so that would help both the cosplayer and the photographer in the long run.

Also, I think it's just common etiquette for the photographer to give you the URL to their website if they plan on posting your pictures on a website and to not post them there at all if you request it. As far as jerks online a) claim that the photograph is of them when it's really not or b) make fun of the said cosplayer (like at Cats on Mars…), just ignore them - unless it's letter a, then you should do something about that because that is identity theft.

I don't really care what people think about me when my picture is posted online, long as it's not on a hentai or porno website. I don't know them, and even if I did, it's not like my feelings would be hurt by their pointless insults which are probably covering up a lack of self-esteem.

I think etiquette is important amongst the photography aspect of cosplay as well. Actually, I think it's one of the most important aspects. Bad experience with photography can ruin cosplay for another cosplayer.

JadeCat
10-17-2005, 02:47 PM
Basically, what I am asking is like this:

Some cosplayers find a costume and say: "I like this!", get a few pictures of the character, make the costume and have no idea what show its from, or what the character's personality is like. Should a cosplayer have a prepared set of poses that are signature to the character?

Also, Should the cosplayer be open to posing or doing actions which the photographer wants, without being demeaning, and have the right to say no at any time.

I believe that a cosplayer should be absoluteley prepared mentally to have their photos taken, either by "snipers" or by people who ask. Whenever you walk into any convention, it's almost a given that photographs are going to be taken, esp. if you're in costume.

Poses? I don't necessarily think that the cosplayer should prepare poses that are signature to the character. It would be nice, but some people can be self-concious. There's another thread regarding who does the posing...cosplayer or photographer, so I won't get into that here.

Should the cosplayer have the right to say no? Well, yes and no.
A cosplayer can say no. The photographer does not necessarily have to respect that right.

Many conventions and costumed events now are saying in their rules, "if you come to this event, you will be photographed and that by coming, you agree to this rule." This basically takes away your right to whatever "image" privacy you may have.

NOW, can a photographer "sell" your image? Not without your implicit and written permission, outside of an actual photojournalist (newspapers don't give a whit about model releases). However, they can post your image on their gallery. You *can* ask them to take it down, and common courtesy also says they should acquiese, but it does not mean they *have* to do so.

Although many conventions are on private property and are a privately held event, there really is no "protection" against invasion of privacy such as having your photograph taken at such an event.

For the Photographer. Should they follow the course of common courtesey for taking pictures. And would it be impropper for them to ask for a "cheesecake" pose when applicable. (I won't go any farther than that.)

And do you think it's propper for anyone to just come up and take a picture and walk away..

Personally, I think that photographers should have some common courtesy for the person they are shooting and that common courtesy dictates that you ask in some way. However, it's also within their right to walk up to you, take a photo, and walk away with nary a word, especially when the rules state that this is a photographic event.

And, if the model agrees to a certain pose, then it's okay, even if it is "cheesy". If a photographer INSISTS on the model doing a pose that the model does not want to do then I would consider that harrassment, and akin to some creep following you around.

Efecss
10-17-2005, 05:50 PM
I believe that a cosplayer should be absoluteley prepared mentally to have their photos taken, either by "snipers" or by people who ask. Whenever you walk into any convention, it's almost a given that photographs are going to be taken, esp. if you're in costume.

Reading that, I think THAT is really the main objective to this thread. Instead of just signature poses. Just be ready to pose. Basically, don't make yourself un interesting, and don't be made to do anything you don't want to do.

jtnishi
10-17-2005, 09:27 PM
NOW, can a photographer "sell" your image? Not without your implicit and written permission, outside of an actual photojournalist (newspapers don't give a whit about model releases).
Oh, I most definitely wouldn't count on that statement without fetching advice from a lawyer knowledgible on the subject. In a public location, it may be very risky to assume that the 1st amendment is that narrow. From a cosplayer's point of view, it is better to assume that any person that takes your picture in a public location may sell said picture on a for-profit motive, irregardless of whether they're "reporting" or not, unless you know the person well enough to know that they wouldn't. Think about the paparazzi, and why it's legal for them to do what they do. And if you define "sell" as not necessarily requiring "for profit" motive, you could see problems.

Efecss
10-18-2005, 02:17 AM
[/SIZE]Oh, I most definitely wouldn't count on that statement without fetching advice from a lawyer knowledgible on the subject. In a public location, it may be very risky to assume that the 1st amendment is that narrow. From a cosplayer's point of view, it is better to assume that any person that takes your picture in a public location may sell said picture on a for-profit motive, irregardless of whether they're "reporting" or not, unless you know the person well enough to know that they wouldn't. Think about the paparazzi, and why it's legal for them to do what they do. And if you define "sell" as not necessarily requiring "for profit" motive, you could see problems.

Tue enough. This gets into one of those grey areas of reasoning. For the most part, what you are talking bout is much different than people taking picures of celebreties. Or event photography.

In a way, there are unwritten rules of conduct in fandom that apply more than the mundane world. Generally you can pretty well trust a fan photographer to be generous. (Ofcourse there are a few exceptions.) And their livelihood is not geared to it.

While papparazzi's entire yearly income is geared to getting that one shot, regardless of the person.

And Photojournalists are kind of limited to the scope of reporting history. Not extreme sensationalism.

BUT we seem to be getting off track.

Mainly this thread is for asking: Should a cosplayer be prepared with a signature pose, and does the photographer have the right to ask for any special (even sheesecake/pin-up-like) poses. And should the cosplayer walk away if they don't like the suggestion.

jtnishi
10-18-2005, 09:39 AM
[/SIZE]BUT we seem to be getting off track.

Mainly this thread is for asking: Should a cosplayer be prepared with a signature pose, and does the photographer have the right to ask for any special (even sheesecake/pin-up-like) poses. And should the cosplayer walk away if they don't like the suggestion.
True true true, and I'll jump on track with my thoughts.

At least for those of us who don't know every character out there, it's definitely a lot easier if the cosplayers know a few poses (signature or not). For example, while I could guess on what might make some people look good, in the end, if the cosplayer wants to see a shot go a particular way, the best way they can control it is to control the poses they make, and control the costume in such a way that the key details look strongest in the likeliest directions people are going to take pictures from.

That said, it doesn't relieve photographers of the duty to probably learn at least a few textbook poses, just so people who don't have any ideas won't be stuck with the DMV shot.

As far as cheesecake shots go, I'm always questionable about that. But frankly, I wouldn't dare ask anyone for a cheesecake shot unless I already knew them well enough already that I know that they'd be okay with it. And frankly, I don't know anyone that well yet.

As far as shoot and run? Not proper etiquette, unless you're talking about a gathering situation where there's a number of photographers. That said, I'm occasionally guilty of doing something like that, especially when it's a shot of opportunity (ie: some sort of particular action where the spontaneity of the action dictates a shoot now, ask later attitude).

Ami Yuy
10-18-2005, 01:49 PM
I did a thread on the Photographer's side of this about a year ago...

Do's and Don'ts of Con Photography (http://forums.cosplay.com/showthread.php?t=46382)

And through searching for "etiquette", you come up with several other threads that have dealt with this kind of thing too...

Tenebrae
10-18-2005, 02:28 PM
Mainly this thread is for asking: Should a cosplayer be prepared with a signature pose, and does the photographer have the right to ask for any special (even sheesecake/pin-up-like) poses. And should the cosplayer walk away if they don't like the suggestion.

Yes. :)

BTW, I'm quite happy to do cheesecake poses if somebody wants. I have pr0n of myself stashed in odd places (and had some pics up at mokkori.com at one point). I was quite surprised, flattered, and a touch creeped out at Otakon when an older guy asked me to lean forward and get my badges out of the way for a pose (I was in a corset), but I did it anyway since the flattered part won out. Wish I could have seen how those turned out...heh.
I could have very well said no. A photographer doesn't have the right to force a pose on a person who is in a way doing THEM a favour to stop for them. You can ask. They can accept or decline. Life goes on.

-Tenebrae.

JadeCat
10-18-2005, 04:20 PM
Oh, I most definitely wouldn't count on that statement without fetching advice from a lawyer knowledgible on the subject. In a public location, it may be very risky to assume that the 1st amendment is that narrow. From a cosplayer's point of view, it is better to assume that any person that takes your picture in a public location may sell said picture on a for-profit motive, irregardless of whether they're "reporting" or not, unless you know the person well enough to know that they wouldn't. Think about the paparazzi, and why it's legal for them to do what they do. And if you define "sell" as not necessarily requiring "for profit" motive, you could see problems.

This is just from reading various photography forums. There's been a slew of lawsuits regarding uses of images w/o permission, esp. in the stock photography section of the world.

No stock photography place is going to take a photo w/o all the necessary signatures signed on the dotted line.

Newspapers aren't nearly as picky, because the photographer is capturing a "scene" which includes people...which is why I'm making a distinction between paparazzi/photo journalists versus regular photographers.

(Side note: one photography book that I'm reading, Sacred Places, actually addresses this a little bit, about taking photos in other countries where people are not going to understand about "model" releases, but how they are essential in the stock photography trade.)

However, if the person is clearly identifiable, if you're not a photo journalist, ESPECIALLY if s/he is a minor (of which you need a parent's signature), then the prevailing thread in many photography forums I read is...get a model release before you sell.

Efecss
10-18-2005, 05:27 PM
I did a thread on the Photographer's side of this about a year ago...

Do's and Don'ts of Con Photography (http://forums.cosplay.com/showthread.php?t=46382)

And through searching for "etiquette", you come up with several other threads that have dealt with this kind of thing too...

Well, I'm trying to do something on both sides. But, checking past threads is also good. And sometimes, people's opinions change, so its always good to bring fresh ideas into this melee who maynot hve seen past posts.

Efecss
10-18-2005, 05:40 PM
Yes. :)

BTW, I'm quite happy to do cheesecake poses if somebody wants. I have pr0n of myself stashed in odd places (and had some pics up at mokkori.com at one point). I was quite surprised, flattered, and a touch creeped out at Otakon when an older guy asked me to lean forward and get my badges out of the way for a pose (I was in a corset), but I did it anyway since the flattered part won out. Wish I could have seen how those turned out...heh.
I could have very well said no. A photographer doesn't have the right to force a pose on a person who is in a way doing THEM a favour to stop for them. You can ask. They can accept or decline. Life goes on.

-Tenebrae.

On a side note:
Because Tenebrae mentioned this in a way. Along with my other artwork, I do a lot of fetish artwork (Some general, other hardcore.) And I was emailing this guy in Japan, who was asking about adult video cosplayers, because there are quite a few cosplay girls (Come really well known) who have done this.

He asked: If I went up to an American cosplayer and asked them to do something like this, what would happen.

Well, I replied: "The least of which, you'd get kicked in the groin." Ten I added: "The worst, they'd bprobably get a gun and shoot your face off."

WHile I think it dosen't really hurt to ask. You just don't want to be known as a total perv and have people looking down on you.

But, on the flipside... I put a few comments on a few of members of this site, saying that I would love to do a photosession with them. A couple wrote back saying that they would love to, and they actually said that they would be willing to do partial to full nudity.

(And through my picture taking a various conventions, I got a standing invitation to work with a porn star if I can ever get down to the LA area for more than the days of a convention. (Although it is over 6 years old...) And possibly work with Marilyn Manson's girlfriend, through a mutual acquaintance. But I'm not holding my breath for that.)

But, again, getting back on track. We have had some good comments, and I think we've dipped into the subject I was looking for. But still, anything more would be interesting.

Next I should ask, to the others. Would you (A girl) be offended if someone asked you to pose partially nude? WOuld it devastate you, or would you say no but be flattered? (I know I am stretching this. But I do feel that this goes to part of the question of the thread: "Is it wrong to ask?" Because, that is part of etiquette, asking.) Partially, because if someone did ask, could it ruine the rest of a con for you.

Because, some girls could be totally devastated by this.

Tenebrae
10-19-2005, 07:55 AM
Depends on the girl...
Since I've done those kinds of photoshoots before, no problem for me. I'm an adult.
But don't use me as a gauge for the reactions of other cosplayers! I'm a total shutterslut.

-Tenebrae.

Eleryth
10-19-2005, 09:08 AM
"Next I should ask, to the others. Would you (A girl) be offended if someone asked you to pose partially nude? WOuld it devastate you, or would you say no but be flattered? (I know I am stretching this. But I do feel that this goes to part of the question of the thread: "Is it wrong to ask?" Because, that is part of etiquette, asking.) Partially, because if someone did ask, could it ruine the rest of a con for you."

I think it depends on many things, such as where and when the question was asked, the reason for it, the age and maturity level of the people in question, and how professional the photog came across (random guy at a convention with camera? non. established photographer, with portfolio and very professional impression? much better chances).

I do not think asking anyone at an anime convention for partial nudity photos is ok, unless perhaps you know the person, have worked with them before, or are using the convention as a meeting place to arrange a later photoshoot (both parties know in advance and agree to chat at the con). There's just too many other factors to consider, I believe, at such an event.

Efecss
10-19-2005, 09:13 AM
Depends on the girl...
Since I've done those kinds of photoshoots before, no problem for me. I'm an adult.
But don't use me as a gauge for the reactions of other cosplayers! I'm a total shutterslut.

-Tenebrae.

Again, I've known girls on both sides of that issue. Infact, if you go to my gallery, the female ninja I did a shoot with was a stripper at the time. She would do topless preformances, but never total nudes. And really didn't want to do any nudes with me (Which I respected.) But we did do some Bettie Paige stuff.

But, I did, on one occasion ask a girl at a convention in the early 90's if she would mind doing some rather risque pictures. And the expression on her face was like I punched her all over her body.

Going back to the topic at hand. maybe as part of etiquette, the photographer should do something to re-assure the model. Even if it means having her bring someone so she can feel safe with.

This also reminds me of something that happened at this year's Ani-magic. I was taking a picture of three girls on sunday, and I was telling them about my cosplay zine, and showing them some of my manga artwork (Non adult.) When one of the girl's mom came up, and she was almost in my face. She wasn't intrusive, but she gave off a nasty vibe. Like a lioness protecting her young. (I mean, it was really strong, or I was overly tired.)

Anyway, I later apologized to her for making her think I was doing something offensive. (Just to set the record straight.)

And I do feel, that (in part) good etiquette is apologizing for making someone feel something that they shouldn't have a reason to. If, it is somewhat justified. (But, I'm just that kind of guy.)

Efecss
10-19-2005, 09:21 AM
"Next I should ask, to the others. Would you (A girl) be offended if someone asked you to pose partially nude? WOuld it devastate you, or would you say no but be flattered? (I know I am stretching this. But I do feel that this goes to part of the question of the thread: "Is it wrong to ask?" Because, that is part of etiquette, asking.) Partially, because if someone did ask, could it ruine the rest of a con for you."

I think it depends on many things, such as where and when the question was asked, the reason for it, the age and maturity level of the people in question, and how professional the photog came across (random guy at a convention with camera? non. established photographer, with portfolio and very professional impression? much better chances).

I do not think asking anyone at an anime convention for partial nudity photos is ok, unless perhaps you know the person, have worked with them before, or are using the convention as a meeting place to arrange a later photoshoot (both parties know in advance and agree to chat at the con). There's just too many other factors to consider, I believe, at such an event.

I agree whole heartedly. A convention, no matter what, is not the best place for something like this. Because no matter what, even when there is "down time", there is still other things to do, and places to be.

But, it might be a good idea for the model to get a better perspective on the photographer. See how they like various things. Also, durring, the photographer or model should offer to have dinner to talk about this, and check out their work.

Another reason I don't ask anything like this, is because I live like 300+ miles from where everyone is. Even where I live, is a 50+ mile drive to the nearest comicbook store.

But, all this goes to the statement I just made that as part of good manners, or etiquette, the photographer needs to put the model at ease. Be it in the halls, or at a private shoot.

But, I also thing that a model should be aware of her "tolerance level" as to photographers. How much BS can she (or even he) take before something simple completely ruines a day.

PepeluTivursky
10-19-2005, 11:57 AM
I believe in all things like this, it's definetly paramount to ask. While we should be prepared for the 'drive-by photographers', we should expect a little more respect. Myself, I cosplay for the attention and for, just a moment, the feeling of being someone other than myself - and despite how unphotogenic I am, I love getting my picture taken!
This year I'm debating an idea I saw elsewhere on here, in giving out business cards with my email/IM names and asking for copies of pictures they took.

Efecss
10-19-2005, 05:49 PM
This year I'm debating an idea I saw elsewhere on here, in giving out business cards with my email/IM names and asking for copies of pictures they took.

I usually hand out cards of my own, and offer everyone a print.

tfcreate
10-19-2005, 11:15 PM
Unless they specify otherwise, I just let them know where they can find their pictures. One of my BIGGEST peeves is the number of "did you take my picture" posts out there. There are literally tens of thousands of pictures taken at major cons and people STILL cant find their pictures? C'mon....
TFC

Ami Yuy
10-20-2005, 12:21 AM
Unless they specify otherwise, I just let them know where they can find their pictures. One of my BIGGEST peeves is the number of "did you take my picture" posts out there. There are literally tens of thousands of pictures taken at major cons and people STILL cant find their pictures? C'mon....
TFC

Actually, yeah, it is HARD to find them. For the first couple of weeks after a con it's a huge search time for images, and you still generally never find half of the ones that you know were taken. Unless you KNOW who took it or they're a big name (like Lionel, Al, Kyle, ect.), it's a guessing game as to where you'll find it.

I've only ever received ONE card (without asking) and been told only a couple of times where to find images, and I've attended 11 conventions and 2 picnics over the past four years.

Granted, the "Did you take my picture" threads have not resulted in any huge sucess for me personally, but I do not find it annoying, especially since here on Cosplay.com they've got a good system going where there is one central thread for it now for each convention.

I can't say I'm any better at telling people where to find the pictures that I take of them, but I do make an effort to reply to those threads if they ask.

Mucai
10-20-2005, 01:02 AM
I believe that a cosplayer should be absoluteley prepared mentally to have their photos taken, either by "snipers" or by people who ask. Whenever you walk into any convention, it's almost a given that photographs are going to be taken, esp. if you're in costume.

I personally donít want my photo taken at all. Weather I'm in a costume or not.

Super No 1
10-20-2005, 01:28 AM
Unless they specify otherwise, I just let them know where they can find their pictures. One of my BIGGEST peeves is the number of "did you take my picture" posts out there. There are literally tens of thousands of pictures taken at major cons and people STILL cant find their pictures? C'mon....

You said it yourself. There are tens of thousands of pictures taken at major cons. Looking for photos of yourself can be like looking for a needle in a haystack. After a convention, I like to look through other people's photos. Before I had DSL, looking through massive galleries took forever. If you're on dial-up, you might not have enough patience for it.

For me, the biggest problem with the "did you take my picture" posts is that the cosplayers assume that photographers can easily identify costumes or characters. Most of the time, I have no idea who somebody is cosplaying as. It does no good to ask for a photo of yourself dressed as (fill in the blank) when we have no idea of what you are talking about. :confused:

tfcreate
10-20-2005, 01:43 AM
I consider this a major problem. I show the quick view photos to the player that I've just photographed, give them a URL and still, a week later, they say that they haven't found them. I mean, personally I'll shoot up to 500 frames at a con and we're supposed to remember one cosplayer? Geeze... I can't even remember the picture I took yesterday. How are we the photogs, supposed to make these things available? I don't even edit the pics, I post them as roughs and if the player wants them, then they can just copy it... Don't hotlink...... (GOD!!! I hate that.... grrrr......) I'm working on a couple of ideas, but it gets really old to hear the same things over and over..... ok..... I'll stop ranting.... :whew: My point is.... players, photogs..... get coordinated.... Cons...... try to desegnate photographers....
TFC

Eurobeat King
10-20-2005, 01:45 AM
I don't reply to the "DYTMP?" threads often, if only to tell people to please look at my galleries and hopefully they'll find them (as well as look at the other pictures of cosplayers I took.) I've been to a lot of cons and know a lot of cosplayers, so my friends, acquaintances, and even new members who've seen my pics know what I look like, so if they recall me taking their picture (either by me asking to take their pics individually or if they spot me taking pictures of LARGE cosplay gatherings) then they should know that I'll post the pictures and where to find them. I'm not perfect, as I do miss cosplayers, so it helps if they come up to say hello and/or ask to have their picture taken, in which I will be happy to do so. :) That helps me a lot during those big, hectic conventions..

Efecss
10-20-2005, 01:50 AM
Actually, yeah, it is HARD to find them. For the first couple of weeks after a con it's a huge search time for images, and you still generally never find half of the ones that you know were taken. Unless you KNOW who took it or they're a big name (like Lionel, Al, Kyle, ect.), it's a guessing game as to where you'll find it.

I've only ever received ONE card (without asking) and been told only a couple of times where to find images, and I've attended 11 conventions and 2 picnics over the past four years.

Like I've stated before, I usually give out cards to just about everyone (If you were at AM, I may have given one to you, I was a green wizard, or a TRANSFORMER.) I think it's only fair and gratuitous to do this. One reason, is that I know I hardly ever think of taking my picture in costume, so I knind of help those who may not. (Still wish I had a picture of me as Wreck-Gar from Transformer the movie....)

But still... I feel this is a good way to make the cosplayers want to do more pictures with you.

Granted, the "Did you take my picture" threads have not resulted in any huge sucess for me personally, but I do not find it annoying, especially since here on Cosplay.com they've got a good system going where there is one central thread for it now for each convention.

I can't say I'm any better at telling people where to find the pictures that I take of them, but I do make an effort to reply to those threads if they ask.

And I think that is very courtious of you.

Efecss
10-20-2005, 02:03 AM
Okay, okay, okay.....

Once again, drifting from the main reason I put this thing up. Courtesey.

Basically I was thinking about the courtesey of interacting with someone at the convention. While interacting with them afterwards could also be included, I think that the last few peices on giving someone a picture, or where to look for themselves seems to go completely off track here.

WHile I do think the process of offering a picture for their time is good, it just seems like the main thrust of this thread seems to be going off the process of common courtesey.

Let me get it back on track like this"

Cosplayers: (Mainly for the ladies) WOuld you take a picture for someone who was making rude comments at the time. And, what would be the break off point that a photographer can ask you for a particular pose (i.e Cheesecake or pinup...)?

Photographers. Do you feel politeness is necessary while asking a cosplayer to pose, and putting them in a pose. And do you feel a cosplayer should have a signature pose ready?

tfcreate
10-21-2005, 10:44 PM
Photographers. Do you feel politeness is necessary while asking a cosplayer to pose, and putting them in a pose. And do you feel a cosplayer should have a signature pose ready?

Politeness is necessary under ANY circumstance that does not involve hostility. Granted, there are those who consider manners as being a wuss or "uncool" or even interpert it as flirting... (yes there are hypersensitive people who can't tell the difference..) but, I want the players to feel comfortable and under no perssure to be photographed. Cosplaying is difficult enough without stalkeratzzi chasing them around.

TFC

Efecss
10-22-2005, 02:41 AM
Politeness is necessary under ANY circumstance that does not involve hostility. Granted, there are those who consider manners as being a wuss or "uncool" or even interpert it as flirting... (yes there are hypersensitive people who can't tell the difference..) but, I want the players to feel comfortable and under no perssure to be photographed. Cosplaying is difficult enough without stalkeratzzi chasing them around.

TFC

Good point. I thin it is correct to say that the conventions we go to is a gathering of people who enjoy many similar things. (I.e. Anime, costuming, meeting stars.) Bei it an anime convention like Ani-Magic or Expo, or a regular Sci-Fi convention like BayCon or WorldCon.

And by definition, cosplayers are exhibitionists (Not nude exhibitionists.) But, being so, it does not give anyone the right to be disrespectful to anyone.

We are "fans", not "fannatics". There are those in the mundane world who see us as prsuing childish dreams, and/or still remaining in our teens for all eternity. And, there are some who do and really show it.

And I feel that it is the stalkerazzi that kind of hurt the fan photographer image to those who do not know us. (Not theose who go to conventions.)

Now, another side question. WOuld any cosplayer, would it be helpful if the photgrapher, after asking, taking a moment to ask for a few poses. Or do you think taking pictures on the fly or on the quick, be just as helpful.

I know, I have asked for a couple of poses just to get in because I didn't want any extra flash disrupting the picture I was taking. But I sometimes feel that I am rushing the person too much, and that may be rude.

Also, if a cosplayer is part of agroup, and the group is kind of not doing much, how do some of you feel about being asked to step aside for a picture, or would you ask to have the group with you. (I feel that this is part of etiquette, because it is always proper to include the group, and not exclude it.)

In a way, this picture is kind of what I was talking about. http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=520916