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Efecss
03-26-2006, 06:16 AM
In the general discussion area, a while back, someone was asking about posing.

Well, I was looking through some old Bud Plant Catalogs recently, and found a booklet that phogoraphers use for models, to convey what kind of poses they want.

Now, the person who's thread I was talking about, was asking about signature poses and how she was wondering if she should know the pose her character is suppose to have, or should she take direction from the photographer.

When I saw the book in the catalog, I kind of thought to myself, maybe this might be handy. Making a booklet with some of the more popular characters in their signature poses, and/or make a book with some general poses that you can show to someone to convey what you are looking for, if it gets tedious with them. Meaning you spend over two minutes trying to get a pose out of them that they just don't understand, or you can't quite convey

(And now we turn to Jak Jaramouche for his comment.)

deleriumx
03-26-2006, 09:09 AM
I have one of those pose booklets that i use when i am doing shoots in a studio, however i have a feeling it may be a bit more difficult in a con setting (unless, of course, you are doing a private photoshoot). For me, sometimes it takes some time to get the pose just right, especially when the person i am shooting is not an experienced model (As many cosplayers are not) The whole photographer/model exchange in a con setting is so brief, that stopping people and showing them poses to do might be a bit awkward..
I think if you are doing private photoshoots with cosplayers at cons, this could be really useful.. but i'm not sure how it would work for hall cosplay shots. but you could always give it a try and tell us how it turns out :)

kkoganei1328
03-26-2006, 07:58 PM
i'm not a photographer but a cosplayer and i have had people ask me to do different poses etc. it was a bit awkward but i didnt really mind too much. if it makes my look better, i'm all for it! =D

Photorusse
03-26-2006, 08:18 PM
I have a pose guide that is quite thick. This is a general guide that the model can look through and mark so during the shoot when things slow down, there is always a reference. I suggest to anyone to tear out poses you like from magazines and print from the internet and keep in a book for yourself. But for cosplay, I would think that the main guide would be the character you are emulating.

Efecss
03-26-2006, 09:06 PM
I have a pose guide that is quite thick. This is a general guide that the model can look through and mark so during the shoot when things slow down, there is always a reference. I suggest to anyone to tear out poses you like from magazines and print from the internet and keep in a book for yourself. But for cosplay, I would think that the main guide would be the character you are emulating.


I am trying to find out, is that would this be beneficial to anyone.
Say, you have a small book, that has a page or two of poses of the Sailor Scouts as a group and as individuals. Or you have some pages from an artbook for Rovolutionary Girl Utena that you would like to do if you find an Utena and Anthy.

Would it be more beneficial to have something like this, than try and describe the ideal shot.

But, your suggestion is also a good one, that I may have to add to my little tips for beginning cosplayers. If things get into a quandry with them and the photographer, they just pullout a small book of signature poses for their character and say; "Look though this, and see what you would like me to do."

jtnishi
03-27-2006, 12:05 AM
When I saw the book in the catalog, I kind of thought to myself, maybe this might be handy. Making a booklet with some of the more popular characters in their signature poses, and/or make a book with some general poses that you can show to someone to convey what you are looking for, if it gets tedious with them. Meaning you spend over two minutes trying to get a pose out of them that they just don't understand, or you can't quite convey
This does sound like it'd be a useful resource. It's something I've wanted for a while. The only issue I'd see is that there'd be a lot of time required to collect together the information, and that it would probably run afoul of copyright issues.

That said, in theory, if you used pictures of cosplayers in such signature poses correctly, it'd probably be easier to obtain permission to use, since chains of ownership would be easier to trace. In addition, many cosplay photographers might be more open to the idea of allowing their work to be used in such a fashion if such a guide was made available for open use by other photographers and cosplayers. And it's not like there's any lack of cosplay pictures of people in the outfits of popular characters.

Efecss
03-27-2006, 12:32 AM
This does sound like it'd be a useful resource. It's something I've wanted for a while. The only issue I'd see is that there'd be a lot of time required to collect together the information, and that it would probably run afoul of copyright issues.

True enough...

That said, in theory, if you used pictures of cosplayers in such signature poses correctly, it'd probably be easier to obtain permission to use, since chains of ownership would be easier to trace. In addition, many cosplay photographers might be more open to the idea of allowing their work to be used in such a fashion if such a guide was made available for open use by other photographers and cosplayers. And it's not like there's any lack of cosplay pictures of people in the outfits of popular characters.

Well, another way would be to use costumes that are almost like, but not exactly like, ones used. Like you could put a girl in a costume made for suare dancing (WHich has a lot of crinoline in the skirt) and just show a couple of poses, with the skirt in several possitions.

And for fighting girls, or girls with swords, just get someone to pose in different stances, or frozen movements. Something just to show an idea. I dosen't have to be THE character.

Just whitteling down the idea.

In addition: There is a HOW TO DRAW MANGA book, that does give possitions like the ones I am talking about.

Sashi
03-27-2006, 03:17 AM
That sounds like a great idea!!!I'm terrible at posing and around the 3rd pose I start running out of ideas and begin repeating the poses again : /

I'd love to be alble to get a book like that and I know many other people who'd love it too.

Ami Yuy
03-27-2006, 03:36 AM
As a cosplayer I've started to print out pose references for the character and bring them with me. At the COSMODE shoot I showed the sheet to Kyle and he chose a couple which he thought would work and we took them.

As a photographer, if I'm doing a private shoot I try and research the character beforehand so I know how the costume is supposed to look, what the character is like, how they pose, etc. so that I can do my best in getting good photos of the person.

For general con photos I let the cosplayer do the first pose and then depending on whether they/I are busy I might ask for a second pose. But this is one of the main reasons I generally stick with photos of characters I know, then I can help them pose if need be.

A generalized pose book would be cool to have, definately. I know I run out after awhile and then by the time the cosplayer's out as well we may still have tons of time/location opportunities left but have run out of unique/good poses to do.

Photorusse
03-27-2006, 05:16 AM
You really don't have to worry about getting permission for photos to use in your book. If you're able to rip an image off a DVD, download from the internet, or rip from the pages of a magazine, that is fine. You're using the images for your personal use, so rip away!! I took my images from the net from model sites and mostly Betty Page! Then I hit Cosmo, W, etc. Remember, look at the pose, not the clothes! Ami, I agree with you: if I were planning a shoot with a Cosplayer, I would research the character and visit every web site about that character and probably download and print as many images as I could.

Efecss
03-27-2006, 06:50 AM
You really don't have to worry about getting permission for photos to use in your book. If you're able to rip an image off a DVD, download from the internet, or rip from the pages of a magazine, that is fine. You're using the images for your personal use, so rip away!! I took my images from the net from model sites and mostly Betty Page! Then I hit Cosmo, W, etc. Remember, look at the pose, not the clothes! Ami, I agree with you: if I were planning a shoot with a Cosplayer, I would research the character and visit every web site about that character and probably download and print as many images as I could.

Granted, since you are not reproducing them to sell, this would be fine. It's like that law of eminant domain in copywrite laws. Making a copy for your own use is not against the law.

-----

Well, this has gotten me into the mindset of trying to do this. As a small press publisher, and doing my own cosplay zine.

Now, the question becomes (From Ami Yuy) how generalized. Would it be more advantagous to ask several cosplayers to do some signature poses. Or simply ask a guy and a girl to do some poses that would be useful for anime? (The girl would have to pose in various skirts too.)

And as for copyrights from the studio. I found out that there is a caviate to copyrights in certain situations.

Photorusse
03-27-2006, 07:32 AM
Yes, you would have to have permission to reproduce the anime for a pose guide. You would have a much easier time just getting cosplayers to pose for you. Make sure you have model releases. They are very easy to download from web sites. If you need one, I can try to post one as an attachment later.

jtnishi
03-27-2006, 05:58 PM
Now, the question becomes (From Ami Yuy) how generalized. Would it be more advantagous to ask several cosplayers to do some signature poses. Or simply ask a guy and a girl to do some poses that would be useful for anime? (The girl would have to pose in various skirts too.)
That's a good point. On the one hand, one would presume that the burden would normally be on the cosplayer to know a signature pose or two for the character they're cosplaying. That said, I've run into a multitude of people who don't know any good or signature poses. Many of them are cosplaying popular characters, but my memory is terrible, especially in regards to things like body angles. That means that indeed, both sides (signature poses, and good general poses) need to be addressed, and the more important problem becomes where the balance should be to account for a reasonable size. Personally, I don't care as much about getting characters in signature poses, because I can't remember how to make signature photo compositions anyway :P. But I can guess that more than a few might prefer it.

staereo
03-28-2006, 05:51 AM
I'm a photographer first and an anime fan second.

I would say that I recognize a cosplay about 30-50 percent of the time. Out of that 30-50 percent, I would sat about a tenth of those I could actually suggest a character specific pose.

For this reason, I would normally not get involved in the poses which a cosplayer would want to take.

HOWEVER, if a pose makes the cosplayer look particularly bad, or if the cosplayer has no pose and wants a generic flattering pose, I would quickly voice my opinion of what I wanted to capture.

I suppose the idea is to make the cosplayer look accurate, then good. Not a typical glamour/fashion viewpoint, but it is cosplay and thats the idea.

Bruce

Photorusse
03-28-2006, 10:40 AM
I think it strange that a cosplayer would spend many hours and many dollars perfecting a costume representing their favorite anime and then either have no idea how that character acts/moves or do not care. It seems very incomplete and not typical of the cosplayers that I have met over the years.
That is usually the starting point for a shoot: get the cosplayer to use character specific poses and then let creativity take it's course for the rest of the shoot and that is when a generic pose guide would come in handy.

hibekisensai
03-28-2006, 01:34 PM
My purpose for taking cosplay photos is to capture the natural spirit of the person cosplaying. I don't concern myself with poses, however if the cosplayer poses or no-poses, i feel i am capturing the natural them, however they choose.

I am an amateur photographer (maybe not even amateur!), doing it for fun, but in all of my cosplay photos, i like to first capture the person, and then the cosplay. Capturing emotion, thought, natural demeanor is always more important to me as a photographer than the "glamour" shot.

I really enjoy seeing "professional" cosplay photography with cosplayers who are very good at posing. When it comes to posing, i really believe that the photographer has a lot of influence in the the types of poses they get out of a cosplayer...i think the photographer can help create a comfortable environment that provides more confidence to the cosplayer, potentially getting some really gripping photos...:)

Efecss
03-28-2006, 09:13 PM
I think it strange that a cosplayer would spend many hours and many dollars perfecting a costume representing their favorite anime and then either have no idea how that character acts/moves or do not care. It seems very incomplete and not typical of the cosplayers that I have met over the years.
That is usually the starting point for a shoot: get the cosplayer to use character specific poses and then let creativity take it's course for the rest of the shoot and that is when a generic pose guide would come in handy.

Correct. And that's what I'm wanting this for. While Staereo's comment about wanting glamour shots is something I can appreciate. This book idea is to break the ice for those who are not savy to posing. Or who are just starting out and are uncomfortable. It gives a starting place. Or where communication is tenuous. Say like with some one from Japan who comes over.

This is just a catch-all idea. And cosplayers usually try and emulate their character to some extent.

ross@the-smoke.
03-30-2006, 03:24 PM
Just a couple of comments....

In copyright terms, ripping stuff on to your own PC can still violate a copyright, depending on how it is used (e.g. screen grabs from DVDs is a technical breach), but as long as you don't start selling them or publishing them or using them in your own work you're generally not going to get chased down.

Signature poses is another issue altogether. You can reproduce a person's image, style, mannerisms etc yourself - without this our impressionists would be unable to do anything! Provided, of course, you don't try and pass off your impression as the original. Then you get in to problems.

Of course there can be variances in local laws, so worth checking if you're getting serious.

For the discussion on posing, a good photographer will put the model (whether professional, amateur or just along to be snapped) at ease. I prefer studio settings when I've shot people, where I have a high degree of control over the environment, as well as privacy. Also I like the model to bring along a chaperone if they're an amateur or first-timer, and their fave music. Then its up to me to build rapport and work from there!!!

But each to their own.


Ross

Efecss
04-04-2006, 02:43 AM
Well, what would everyone suggest for poses? Like some of Sailor Moon's poses are some stances I noticed from some Japanese pop culture books I have.

SolarTempest
04-13-2006, 12:45 AM
I really think character-specific poses are the way to go. It's nice to have matching "feel" and personality to the character (one way is through their existing poses).

For other times though, I have found these to be very helpful:
http://tempest.dyndns.org/model poses.html

Not a 100% reliable link, but should work most of the time.
I take no credit for these poses whatsoever - I found them one long lost day on the internet and forgot to write down where I got it from.

I keep them in a little notebook so I can offer them up when I'm out of pose ideas or the models/cosplayers are out of ideas. I suppose it's a hit on the ego if you have to look at some pictures to get some ideas, but I think the cosplayers and myself realize that the results are well worth it.

Efecss
04-13-2006, 01:22 AM
I really think character-specific poses are the way to go. It's nice to have matching "feel" and personality to the character (one way is through their existing poses).

For other times though, I have found these to be very helpful:
http://tempest.dyndns.org/model poses.html

Not a 100% reliable link, but should work most of the time.
I take no credit for these poses whatsoever - I found them one long lost day on the internet and forgot to write down where I got it from.

I keep them in a little notebook so I can offer them up when I'm out of pose ideas or the models/cosplayers are out of ideas. I suppose it's a hit on the ego if you have to look at some pictures to get some ideas, but I think the cosplayers and myself realize that the results are well worth it.

Right. Now that's a good way to start. And maybe put in a section with some genreal costume types, and some poses that they are most flatering in.

Its someplace to begin. And that's what I want this book to be like. To break the ice if need be.

staereo
04-13-2006, 10:30 AM
I have a photobook of poses too.

After tfp models see it, they typically ask if i could include it with their images. I usually do. It really is something models (or in this case, cosplayers) should be versed on more than the photographers. But... being that many models tend to be a little clueless, its smart to keep one around, and has helped me greatly.

Although, whats amusing is seeing how different builds look like when taking these generic poses. Some poses work for some models... others definately do not.

Bruce

Hiro_01
04-13-2006, 04:11 PM
I just memorise the poses form the character if they have a stance, like when i played Shikamaru and Ed. But i think Shuichi's going to be hard if i don't have a Yuki.

staereo
04-13-2006, 06:47 PM
Hiro- this is a sign of a good model. hehe. makes a photographers job much smoother. Having a base pose to work with means we just gotta work off of it. ^^

Legatosgurl
04-25-2006, 09:06 AM
>> I really hope this is the right place, if not a little OOTish. ><
The main issue I have whenever I'm getting my picture taken is this really annoying double-chin thing that happens. No matter what pose I try, it always ends up the same. *Sigh* Any one have any ideas?

(It dosen't help that alot of time there's a shiny sheet of flooring underneath me... ><)

staereo
04-25-2006, 11:47 AM
Are you somewhat tall? Try poses that put you BELOW the camera, so that the camera is looking down on you. This will help to reduce problems below the chin.

Bruce

deleriumx
04-25-2006, 07:25 PM
agree with what staereo said. also, what i always do (As i have the same problem) is tilt my chin upwards and push my neck out a bit to elongate it and stretch the skin out. helps a ton. i will check and see if i have any examples of me doing this to show you

staereo
04-25-2006, 07:30 PM
absolutely what delerium said. I saw that picture in Legato's' gallery and assumed she was trying that. But I think delerium's images of more subtle ways to accomplish the chin lift would be super helpful. When you combine the chin-tilt and the camera angle, you can eliminate any flaws you may be worried about in that area!

Good call delerium!

UzerLain
05-22-2006, 08:24 AM
I have a pose guide that is quite thick. This is a general guide that the model can look through and mark so during the shoot when things slow down, there is always a reference. I suggest to anyone to tear out poses you like from magazines and print from the internet and keep in a book for yourself. But for cosplay, I would think that the main guide would be the character you are emulating.
I'm confused about the books that you guys are talking about. Are these pose books that you make yourself, like print piccys of the internet of the characters you wanna take piccys of doing the poses you want, or do you buys these books?:confused:

staereo
05-22-2006, 10:55 AM
I'm confused about the books that you guys are talking about. Are these pose books that you make yourself, like print piccys of the internet of the characters you wanna take piccys of doing the poses you want, or do you buys these books?:confused:

You can purchase these pose books. http://www.onemodelplace.com/ almost always has them on their front page. if not im sure they are super easy to find on that site. Just to give you an idea. Not that they are the best nor the cheapest, but its something I see almost every day on that site, so it came to mind first.

Hope that helps give you the idea of what they are talking about.

Bruce

nikki23nishi
06-07-2006, 02:16 AM
I act and posing is important to me with the character im playing, i generaly just try to catch myself in a mood and remeber how im standing. like if im mad at the compter for being slow i try to remeber the look i had on my face. So far, anime has helped my acting, i know it sounds crazy but if im supposed to play someone happy i try to remeber how Suichi and Yuiko look, that helps you know? I do it for pictures too. So i guess i just think of my character for a pose, and i have a folder on my comp called "faces and poses" from characters i like. I just try to get in the mood of ther person im playing. It works in poses too.
Wow this is getting long... but i take alot of pictures and rather than "Cheese" if i know the person i say somthin to bring out the mood i want to get ol film, like in this pic of my friends OC: (sorry crappy cam)

In this one i said "Big pimpin!" See how it made her tilt her chin back like a rapper? http://img48.imageshack.us/img48/7161/lastday0769tt.jpg

And in this onei said "Do a Actress!" and she did her little Cocky Actress pose:
http://img48.imageshack.us/img48/2103/lastday0798gn.jpg

And last i said "OMG its Akito!" (fruits basket):
http://img110.imageshack.us/img110/876/lastday0783cb.jpg

I usualt do alot better work than this but it was a lousy cam an bad lighting, but her personality came through. She loves them! I just wanted to say that talking to someone generaly helps me, telling jokes and stuff.

Im no pro though- its just a hobby. I just thought it was the best trick id learned and id share it. ^_^"

QueenAleta
06-25-2006, 08:19 PM
I have worked with a photographer at a local sci-fi con called Necronomicon that has a pose book on hand. I've found it very helpful at times. For instance last year over the course of the day he took around 300 pictures of me in different costumes. After a while you start to run out of ideas. I love costuming & modeling but I personally don't get into character poses as much. I honestly try to focus on getting the best pictures possible for both the costume & my figure.

Tifa_Lock
06-26-2006, 02:19 PM
I think posing is important to take photos of cosplay! At the last con I went at my country, Spain, my friend and I asked to take some photos to two girls cosplayed as Shigure and Tohru from Fruits Basket. They seemed to not like the idea, but they posed for us. Then, my friend said "Shigure, look at Tohru like this: H_H !". The girls just went away without saying anything, but they looked angrily at my friend. We just though they were rude.
A lot of people has asked me to do some poses to take photos and I've always been happy to do what they wanted. If I make cosplay, it's not just to feel as my character. I like to take photos acting as my characters, and I like too when someone asks you for a pose, then you do it the best you can and the people look happy.

Sorry if I didn't explain properly xD

UzerLain
06-26-2006, 04:09 PM
I think it is important for people to be willing to pose in their costumes, but if they don't want to or are nervous you shouldn't force them. Those girls were probably just nervous or didn't understand why someone that they didn't know would want to take their pictures. I think usually cosplayers are very willing to get their pictures taken though!! :bigtu:

Tifa_Lock
06-27-2006, 05:41 AM
You're right, but nobody forced them, actually ^^U We just asked them please ><

CelestialAurora
06-27-2006, 02:57 PM
well, i pretty much try to pose as the character that i'm cosplaying as. the bad thing is that i tend to recycle poses so in all the pics i'm like doing the same thing. ^^;;

Jurai
06-28-2006, 03:07 PM
I met lots of cosplayer who prefer getting orders for posing by the photograph. I guess it's the better way. Isn't it the same in USA ? What about those photographs ? Don't they tell you - the cosplayers - how to look, how to stand or what ever ?

I'm not a cosplayer. I've never made a costume and I never will. I'm the one who sees, how the Cosplayer is looking like.

Greetz Jurai :skidude2:

staereo
06-28-2006, 03:37 PM
Jurai- I do both. Sometimes the cosplayer is very creative. They have an idea in their head that works well. Sometimes its PERFECT, and sometimes its not quite how they mean it, and I do a little directing. Other problems that OFTEN come about in cosplay photography is indecency. I make a point to take a moment during every composition of a revealing cosplay to ensure that nothing is showing that isnt intended to. If Im not sure if it is suppose to, I ask if its ok if it is revealing in that way.

Other times I will come up and help them rectify the problem.

Then there is the timid or lost cosplayer that doesnt know how to stand or feels nervous in front of a lens. I help them a little more actively by looking for a pose that strikes me as appealing to the eye.

I try to give the cosplayer first dibs though. Allows me to see other's creativity at work, before I start implementing my own creativity.

Anime London
07-26-2006, 11:09 PM
Originally posted in Anime North 06 Day 1 report (http://www.animelondon.ca/cosplay/an06/day01.html)...

http://www.animelondon.ca/cosplay/an06/day01/thumbs/an06-115.gif_http://www.animelondon.ca/cosplay/an06/day01/thumbs/an06-117.gif
Backward glance added more

First day of a con is always full of energy. I manage to try something different with a few photos. Typically alot of people just stand there. There are times it's hard to convince people to break out of the mold. First is a typical 3 quarter shot which shows off the costume nicely. As she was walking away I asked her to stop and look back. This photo which the crowd blurring in the background is awesome alternative photo.

http://www.animelondon.ca/cosplay/an06/day01/thumbs/an06-128.gif_http://www.animelondon.ca/cosplay/an06/day01/thumbs/an06-131.gif
After thought, a snarl would have made it better

Okay Zorro shouldn't be wearing glasses for one but the first is a typical full or frontal photo. Pretty flat with no dimension. Second is 3 quarter view of just the head using flash. The flash dropped off the background leaving the face silhouetted.

http://www.animelondon.ca/cosplay/an06/day01/thumbs/an06-195.gif_http://www.animelondon.ca/cosplay/an06/day01/thumbs/an06-197.gif
The photographer gets the point

Not all alternative shots have to be facial. It can get right down.... well this case, down to the floor. No I didn't lay down on the floor. I crouched down then held my camera as best trying to still see the LCD screen. It took a couple of tries to get this one. The first was ruined by the lights in the ceiling which washed out the picture. By changing the perspective of the subject it added a whole lot more to the photo.

With digital photography and memory cards being SO cheap, it makes sense to try new things. After all, you don't have to print or even keep every picture. So many people were deleting alot of pictures because they didn't have larger memory cards, they miss looking back and seeing what worked and what didn't.

For me, I found more techniques by taking several photos of the same person. Just remember the one adage to photography....

You will always have time to take a second picture.
You will not have the time to go back and take it again.

Shikan
08-03-2006, 03:10 AM
Hm... I'm not a great poser.

I think if you want good photos, the cosplayer and photographer need to work together. So I as a cosplayer need intructions.
I've had two (male, no offence!) photographers taking pics of me and my friend. My friend strikes poses all the time so it always turns out well for her.

But the both of them didn't say almost ANYTHING during the shoot so there was a lot of bad pictures where I'm eyes closed, staring to wrong direction etc. Sigh... Then there was this great photographer who actually told us what she wanted and we got loads of good pictures!

So next time I'm photographed I hope the photographer knows what s/he is doing and what kind of pics s/he wants~

coyoterose
08-03-2006, 12:46 PM
I agree very much with Shikan; for good poses and photos there needs to be feedback exchange between both the photographer and the subject. If either one just stands there waiting for the other to do something the results will not be good.

When I'm the one being photographed, I really depend on the person behind the camera giving me at least some direction. They have a much better idea of what the final photo is going to look like, so I rely on them to tell me when a particular pose isn't interesting or flattering and if my wig is crooked, lipstick smeared, etc.

I personally found that I had the best luck when there was at least one other person present besides the subject and the photographer. With three+ minds thinking about how to make the shots interesting, we had a really great time bouncing ideas off each other and the ratio of good to blah photos was better than it might otherwise have been. :)

misplaced
08-03-2006, 07:56 PM
I don't think it's the photographer's job in any way to pose the model. It's your costume, you're wearing it- you therefore should know what's best for you. As his subject and therefore the model, it is your job to flatter yourself and pose yourself in interesting ways.

Then, it will be the photographer's job to capture these moments. Generally the photographer just hits the shutter. In my experience photographers have never posed me- I do all my own stuff.

Seeing Staeraeo's post I do have to say that if the photographer sees something that he doesn't like, he may prompt the model, that's true. However, again, knowing how to pose yourself is essential to a good set of photos.

Efecss
08-03-2006, 08:59 PM
I don't think it's the photographer's job in any way to pose the model. It's your costume, you're wearing it- you therefore should know what's best for you. As his subject and therefore the model, it is your job to flatter yourself and pose yourself in interesting ways.

Then, it will be the photographer's job to capture these moments. Generally the photographer just hits the shutter. In my experience photographers have never posed me- I do all my own stuff.

Seeing Staeraeo's post I do have to say that if the photographer sees something that he doesn't like, he may prompt the model, that's true. However, again, knowing how to pose yourself is essential to a good set of photos.


I do agree withyou, but, the photographer may see your costume a bit differently, and may have some idea as to the setting or the light. But, I agree that you, ourself, should have a set of poses ready for the conventions. They can be hectic, and asking someone to may delay both of you.

ChicoChan
08-03-2006, 09:43 PM
ahaha This is something I need alot of practice with ^^ I think of tons of poses, then when I get in front of the camera I forget them all @_@

I think a pose book is a great idea. even if it's nothing but stick figures reminding you what you need to do.

misplaced
08-03-2006, 10:09 PM
The photographer may see your costume in a different light but he/she is just the photographer. It's your costume, you made it, you know how your character is. Like I said they can correct you but any photographer that tries to direct your vision is just overstepping.

Ami Yuy
08-03-2006, 10:22 PM
The photographer may see your costume in a different light but he/she is just the photographer. It's your costume, you made it, you know how your character is. Like I said they can correct you but any photographer that tries to direct your vision is just overstepping.
Not really.

I'm HAPPY to have a photographer give suggestions. Yes I have some poses of my own that I want to do and to get shots of, but I am always really glad when they have some of their own. They're the ones that can see it all from behind the lense. ^^

And coming from the other side of the camera as well...

Not everyone has poses they know and can do, and even if they do, they might not be as flattering or as "fabulous" as they could be, so what's the harm in the photographer giving some ideas and input?

(From being the cosplayer and photographer now...)
Especially when it's a photoshoot, I think that input from both sides ends up with the best results.

When taking the shots I'm always sure to ask them what pictures they want first and make sure to get those shots and then when we're done with them, if I have any ideas we can do them, and throughout the whole thing we toss suggestions back and forth.

When I'm getting shots taken of me I'm always a bit nervous and while I might have a few ideas for what to do, the photographer is the one who can frame up the shots and place me where I need to be to get them. If they want to give me a way to pose my face/hands/body/etc. then why not?

Collaboration and communication is the key to success.

If the model knows that what they're doing looks great, they are more confident and have a better expression. If the photographer knows what the model is looking for, they can work with it and get some even greater shots. If the photographer tells the model a pose to try, then the model can assume that they know what they're doing and that it should look fabulous.

But also, keep in mind, cosplayers aren't professional models. Most of them haven't studied how to pose, what expression looks best on their face, what way to turn their hips, tilt their chin, etc. I have yet to meet any cosplayer who has gotten upset with me for giving them little tips on ways to adjust their stance/body/face.

misplaced
08-03-2006, 11:28 PM
Ami, it was just my opinion. Though I may have forgotten my model is a model XD

Working with the photographer is often imperative and key to a successful photoshoot. Though I do find it iffy, when you say a photographer can help correct something that may not look right. Doesn't everyone have a very different opinion of what looks good? Asking you cuz you're a photographer and i'm, well, not :P

Ami Yuy
08-03-2006, 11:47 PM
Working with the photographer is often imperative and key to a successful photoshoot. Though I do find it iffy, when you say a photographer can help correct something that may not look right. Doesn't everyone have a very different opinion of what looks good? Asking you cuz you're a photographer and i'm, well, not :P
Yes, everyone does have a different opinion, but I'm mainly referring to the basics of the poses, not necessarily the extremes or the overall shots.

Somethings are obviously better, like say...not squinting. There are also some positions for the parts of the body that make it a more flattering shape or just look more interesting on camera, such as a tilt of the head or a twist of the hips. Just standing and looking straight at the camera can be adjusted in small ways to make it have that much more of an impact/be more flattering in a picture and those are things a photographer can generally help with.

If I think the way I've turned my head is going to look awesome, but the photographer can see that it'll look like my neck's broken in the photo, I would much prefer to have a photographer tell me to adjust my pose than to have them let me look silly. ^^ And if putting my hand on my leg will look better for the overall shot than up by my face, sure, tell me to put it there. XD

Also, there's always the out of place costume piece or strap showing or wig slipping, small little corrections that I always ask if it's supposed to be that way first and if it's not, I then help remind them about it if it keeps happening.

misplaced
08-04-2006, 07:52 AM
Thanks Ami for the tid-bit of info and opinion! Cheers ^^

Jurai
08-04-2006, 03:28 PM
I agree with Ami. I wonder about those different opinions to this Theme. Like i've written before, in Germany it is absolutly normal for cosplayers, to get advices by the photographer.

The Cosplayers just want to look nice, cool, sexy or anything else with their photographs. I talk to them when we're going to have a longer shooting. During the session I show the photographs to. We talk about smiling, looking, feelings, movings and lots of other details.

Sometimes I can't do that:
We spent the last weekend at the biggest german convention. When I made some cosplayers posing, there were mass of photographers standing around. In those moments you can't give good advices to the cosplayers. That's why I ask them to come with me, where is nobody else.

Greetz Jurai :skidude2:

SolarTempest
08-04-2006, 03:43 PM
The photographer may see your costume in a different light but he/she is just the photographer. It's your costume, you made it, you know how your character is. Like I said they can correct you but any photographer that tries to direct your vision is just overstepping.

I like asking my subjects about the personality, style, and attitude of their characters before starting to shoot. Sometimes cosplayers pick these wicked obscure characters and it really helps to know what style of shooting would fit them.

During shoots, I'll do a few shots first to see if the pose is good and adjust from there.

Efecss
01-06-2007, 12:52 AM
Well, I was just thinking of this, and I wanted to put these up as kind of what happens when things work.

I was looking over my galery, and thought these would be a slight visual representation when you get someone who understands what you're tlking a bout. Or when you take the time an explain what you want with them.

http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=746009
http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=679114
http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=370523
http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=295978
http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=273800 (And the next eight picture)

Plus this one I just took a couple of weeks ago. http://images.cosplay.com/showphoto.php?photo=938493

Aerialist
01-06-2007, 01:33 AM
For those who have watched Tsubasa Chronicle or read the manga[Tsubasa Reservoir Chronicle], I am planning to go as Syaoran for my next con, but I can't see him as someone in a pose unless with a prop. Does anyone have any ideas for poses that he might use without props?

Chosuke
01-06-2007, 02:19 AM
I actually LOVE it when a photographer aids me in posing.
I already know the basic attitude and body language of who I'm cosplaying, always. But sometimes, what looks good in front of a mirror or works for an imaginary character may not work for you.

If you're slightly chubby, a photographer can help you pose to make you look your best, and then you can adjust to your attitude and character from there.
Same for if your costume is maybe weak in a few areas, or has a really nice focal point. I think you can see alot of things through the lense, that may not necesarily be visible to the cosplayer. Even if they are seasoned.

I've nearly kicked myself for the times that I knew and practiced a pose in front a mirror, and used it the entire con. Only to realize that in photos.. It didn't work out so well. I really wished at those times someone had told me :/ I ended up getting no pictures of said costumes.

Sala
01-07-2007, 03:47 PM
I think it strange that a cosplayer would spend many hours and many dollars perfecting a costume representing their favorite anime and then either have no idea how that character acts/moves or do not care. It seems very incomplete and not typical of the cosplayers that I have met over the years.
I have made costumes from series that I have never seen, simply because I liked the character design. I've also been asked to join group cosplay, once again for series that I've never seen.

Surprisingly, many times the cosplayer will actually have no idea what their characters "signature" poses are. :D


I know that I'm awful at coming up with poses, so I always love it when photographers help me out! Usually I'm very tired at conventions, so a little push in the right direction is always appreciated. :)

hobbit_marco
01-19-2007, 03:36 AM
I don't think of myself as a model and don't know much about posing. But I usually try to make up some poses before I go to the convention. I also discoverd that posing with a prop, like staff or keyblade, is much easier. If I'm out of poses I usually try to take on a pose that reflects the character's general mood.

Next con will be difficult for me I think, since I am going to crossplay as Shino from .hack//roots. I think I'll have enough trouble trying to look female and do female poses. Now that I think about it... she doesn't really have much specific poses (well yea... only together with Haseo I guess)

For those who have watched Tsubasa Chronicle or read the manga[Tsubasa Reservoir Chronicle], I am planning to go as Syaoran for my next con, but I can't see him as someone in a pose unless with a prop. Does anyone have any ideas for poses that he might use without props?

Hmm you're right... I can't really think of a signature pose for Syaoran without props. He generally is either smiling/relaxed or really serious. Maybe you can use some scenery like leaning against a wall or sitting on something. Though that won't really be possible if someone wants to take your picture in the hallway... I can't help you, gomen nasai!