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cosplaycandy
06-08-2006, 09:50 PM
Okay, after much research and evaluation of funds (thank you all who posted on my first post), I finally have an upgraded my 2.4 MP digital camera to a Fuji Finepix 4.0MP S3000. Now, I would like to start practicing to become a good photographer, especially in terms of cosplay (I want to do a book about it someday). Is it good to start with practice shoots at the conventions I'll be going to (I'll be going to Youmacon for sure, and maybe a few other free ones), or should I just practice with non-cosplay subjects? Thanks again for your consideration. :chatah:

Oklahoma
06-08-2006, 10:13 PM
My recomendation would be to practice with cosplayers and without. You never get good at one thing by practicing one part of it. Use non-cosplay subjects to learn about your camera. A flower for example is more forgiving when you want to try different features out to see what affect they have on a picture. But on the same note you won't learn how to take pictures of cosplayers without practicing with them by using what you know the camera can do.

A friend is also great to practice with. You can try the features you found while taking pictures of say flowers and see how they look with people.

Experiment is the best thing you can do to learn about things. In a photoshoot though feel free to experiment with settings that you know because most people will not be as forgiving if you say you want to try this but you have to learn how to set the camera to do it first.

Another piece of advice is to read up on photography. Learn what appeture/f stop, focal length, ISO, and shutter speed effect a picture and how they work.

The more you know the more you can apply to your pictures, and know how different settings will affect the pictures.

staereo
06-08-2006, 10:13 PM
Some people will recommend you practice on figurines. I wont discourage that, but I have found light bends certain ways around certain sizes. Id say your best bet is practice on people every chance you get. This includes cosplayers at cons.

Biggest thing I must suggest is that you dont be afraid to get things wrong. Experiment. If you spend your time concerned with perfection, you will find yourself too petrified to find your niche.

Bruce

staereo
06-08-2006, 10:15 PM
O.o Gmta....

[SG]
06-09-2006, 12:37 AM
The only suggestion I felt that was left out is that after you're done taking all those practice shots, I recommend taking the time to upload them on your computer and taking a nice close look at all of them.

Take note as to what you like about the shots, what you don't. That way you know roughly at least as to how to produce shots you'd like.

SolarTempest
06-09-2006, 04:07 PM
']Take note as to what you like about the shots, what you don't. That way you know roughly at least as to how to produce shots you'd like.
I used to keep a log of all the bad things in each of my pictures. It was just a spreadsheet with the number of times I found these errors. Didn't take long to really see what I needed to work on.

I don't get to shoot much with cosplayers, but all my other photographic really works to help improve my work in that area. You may find taking quality shots at parties and indoor events will be really similar to shooting at conventions.

photoworks.ws
06-12-2006, 03:22 AM
Okay, after much research and evaluation of funds (thank you all who posted on my first post), I finally have an upgraded my 2.4 MP digital camera to a Fuji Finepix 4.0MP S3000. Now, I would like to start practicing to become a good photographer, especially in terms of cosplay (I want to do a book about it someday). Is it good to start with practice shoots at the conventions I'll be going to (I'll be going to Youmacon for sure, and maybe a few other free ones), or should I just practice with non-cosplay subjects? Thanks again for your consideration. :chatah:
practice, practice, practice. Any kind of people pic and also try action shots. And you might want to check out meetup.com for your area. There are probably some photography, modeling, and cosplay groups who would love to have a photographer (even a beginning one) interested in them.

Curt

Jurai
06-12-2006, 05:25 AM
I practice photographing in two ways:

1.) I spend much time on german conventions. I know lots of cosplayer and they all likes posing. They likes when i tell them how to pose and how to look. The cosplayer can't see when something is wrong. The photographer have to see it, or everybody can see issues on ready photo.

2.) I've got some anime dolls. I take photos from them with different light conditions. Those dolls don't lament and they've got much time.

Greetz Jurai :skidude2:

saiga
06-12-2006, 12:29 PM
Try shooting roadshow events, take your camera out every weekend and shoot good subjects according to the rules of third and stuffs. Don't be lazy. I used to go on photoshooting spree every weekend, be it with or without a beautiful model,without jeprodising my work. Once you start to slack, you'll gradually loose your intrests in this area. If you've the time, do borrow a few books on digital photography and learn the techniques of shooting, with flash, picture editing and stuffs.

Jurai
06-12-2006, 04:14 PM
I famous photographer said:

The first 10.000 photos are the worst. I would submit that everytime !

Greetz Jurai

Xiaolong
07-05-2006, 01:20 AM
Definitely practice with both non-cosplayers as well as cosplayers. Working with a variety of subjects is really key to ensuring that your cosplay photography will be fresh and unique and eyecatching.

Fighterspledge
07-06-2006, 01:39 PM
Just getting used to your equipment is the most important thing you can do. And the best thing you can do is use it as often as possible. And when you use it, use it for everything. The better you understand the strengths, limitations and features of your gear, the faster and more efficent you can be when you're taking that shot with actual people in conventions who are expecting you to take that photo opprotunity right away.

Yeah, just using your camera is often as possible and learning the inside and outs of it's capabilities will definately make you a more efficent photograpgher.

Eriol
07-07-2006, 04:44 PM
I shoot outdoors, indoors, on animate objects, and on inanimate objects for practice. You will get duds along the way, but keep going. I agree with everybody above that taking a variety of photos will best increase your skill level.

EJ Shin
07-09-2006, 04:01 PM
The best way to learn about photography is with a fully manual camera. The Canon A series or Nikon FM series are great cause they're cheap and still hold up today. With a fully manual camera, you're forced to slow down, adjust your shutter, aperature, and focus. This extra time helps you set up your composition as well. With fast digital cameras, sometimes, people just line up and shoot instead of thinking about their shots. You can get a Canon A-1, AE-1, or Nikon FM10 for about a hundred bucks or less. Lenses for these cameras are cheap too. Get a set of prime lenses, they'll help you understand the differences between focal lengths. They're also cheaper and faster too.

staereo
07-09-2006, 04:05 PM
I just want to point out that going with a dSLR offers you the same learning experience, but with no film cost. More up front, but can sometimes feel more free to play around on a budget.

:cheers:
Bruce

Trelyon
07-13-2006, 07:33 PM
"A good photographer measures like an engineer, thinks like a philosopher and sees the world like a poet"

remember that when you're taking a photo... is that your eyes are better than the film you're using... specially if you wear glasses or contacts... you'll see an awesome subject.... take the pix... when you review the shoot... the all the good stuff is too dark... or too light... you are missing the details... so play with your camera setting...

be your own critic... your friends and family might be bias... compare yourself to other photographer that *YOU* admired... etc... if you like post a link here... i'm sure most of us won't mind giving you constructive criticism.

thus... lots of pratices.... aye... flowers are your best friends... for more pratice... you can go to a sport events... most athletes like cosplayers... will pose for you... prolly not the bears... or blackhawks... but high school or college events... also go the lincoln park zoo... take pix of animals.

have fun and good luck

Fighterspledge
07-14-2006, 01:17 AM
You know, I should really reconsider who I take pictures of if thats the case haha. Out here, every time I try to take pictures of my military buddies, They always flip me the bird and ruin all the shots I could possibly send to my family haha. It's all about the subjects that you choose probably. I guess when I get the chance I'll be going to old haunts and try taking photos around there. And the zoo! Haven't been there for a while.

tfcreate
07-16-2006, 01:43 AM
An old photog once told me to start with something simple. He suggested store window displays. You learn composition, lighting, and even how to improvise when conditions aren't ideal, but all on static subjects. I then started to living subjects. More accurately, some of the locals playing at their favourite sports. After a few months of random shooting, I started to get some real positive feedback from the subjects... (Except for the manikins.... they never returned my e-mails.)
The key is practice. People skills are a must.
Good luck and good hunting!
TFC

Yume Megami
08-03-2006, 02:51 AM
Everything you really need to know has already been answered. Just make sure that you don't take 100 pictures and look at them a week later. Take a couple (10-20 photos) then look at them right away. This way you'll remember what settings you were using, and the different variations of settings.
Oh~ and speaking of settings, don't use a billion different settings when taking pictures. Practice with slight variations on the same setting (depending on how many options you have on your camera) so you can get a feel of what your camera is really capable of.

...rarely use the Auto setting. bad~