PDA

View Full Version : Nikon D70S, What kind of program.....


Houki
07-14-2006, 12:58 PM
The help with my folks. They are buying me a Nikon D70s. I want to upload my photo to my computer and edit and print out all my picture but I am not sure of good programs to do that.

Can anyone suggest some software to use?

Also is there a way to connect the camera to your PC and get it downloading after 1 shot to edit and print rght there?


Thanks
Houki

staereo
07-14-2006, 01:07 PM
how much money do you want to spend?

do you plan on capturing RAW or in a picure file?

by connecting, do you mean shooting tethered, as in directly to your computer?

Bruce

Oklahoma
07-14-2006, 01:29 PM
Can anyone suggest some software to use?

Adobe Photoshop CS2

I highly doubt you will be getting that though. I am not very well versed in all the different programs out there, so really cannot make many suggestions here. Also, it would help for us to know what kind of budget you are looking at. There are photo editors from about $50 (and under) all the way up to $600+. For a low cost solution Corel Paint Shop Pro X is usually about $50 (OEM) or $100 (Retail) and if money is no issue Adobe Photoshop CS2 for about $600.

Also, many cameras now come with some sort of photo editing software included. Some of the Nikon users would have to say what is included but with my Canon I got the canon raw convertor and Adobe Photoshop Elements with the camera.


Also is there a way to connect the camera to your PC and get it downloading after 1 shot to edit and print rght there?


Yes, all digital cameras have some way to plug into the computer. Usually through USB. The user manual for the camera will tell you how to do it for your specific camera. You can also purchase a card adaptor to plug the memory card directly into the computer and copy and paste just like with files on the computer.

Eriol
07-14-2006, 04:37 PM
The help with my folks. They are buying me a Nikon D70s. I want to upload my photo to my computer and edit and print out all my picture but I am not sure of good programs to do that.

Can anyone suggest some software to use?

Also is there a way to connect the camera to your PC and get it downloading after 1 shot to edit and print rght there?


Thanks
Houki

I'm a Nikon user. Maybe I can help you with some information.

Don't Forget the Memory Card

Your folks are getting you the camera, but don't forget to buy a memory card. You must buy that memory card separately. The D70s uses the CompactFlash standard. A number of manufacturers produce this type of memory card.

Connecting the Camera to the Computer

The Nikon D70s should come with Nikon View software, PictureProject software, and a USB cable. Install the Nikon View software on your computer. Then, connect one end of the USB cable to the camera and the other end to the computer. Run the Nikon View software on your computer. There will be a function to allow you to view the images on the camera. You will also be able to move the images off the camera and onto the computer.

Another way to move images from the camera to the computer is to remove the CompactFlash card from the camera and insert it into a CompactFlash reader like this one: http://www.sandisk.com/Corporate/Default.aspx?CatID=1175. (You'll have to buy the reader). When you use a card reader, the memory card is like a USB key/thumb drive, so you can upload the images with Windows Explorer (PC), Mac Finder (Mac), or another file management program.

It's not practical to take one picture and then upload it to the computer for immediate editing and printing unless you use Nikon Capture (see below). You would be constantly taking the memory card out of the camera or leaving the camera connected to the computer. You are better off taking a lot of shots, and then upload them to your computer.

Print Directly from the Nikon D50 (D70s?) to a PictBridge-supported Printer

My Nikon D50 also supports direct printing from the camera to a printer that supports the PictBridge protocol, obviating the need for a computer. I presume the D70s will support this as well.

Canon DSLR cameras may support this as well.

Image Editing Software

Nikon View has basic image editing functions, but depending on the type of editing you want to do, it may not be enough. There are several photo editing software you can research. I list some below, but there are others out there.

Nikon Capture: $100; Nikon's own image editing software. It has other functions that interact with Nikon cameras directly, such as using the software to remotely operate the camera via the USB cable (i.e. You use Nikon Capture software to control the camera without having to touch the controls physically on the camera) and loading color profiles to the camera. These features may or may not be needed by users. Otherwise, it is a more powerful image editor than Nikon View. If you decide to take pictures in the D70s's RAW format, this software can read that format.

Corel Paint Shop Pro: $100-$120; A comprehensive image editing program that advertises itself as a low-cost alternative to Photoshop. For many users who just take pictures casually, this is all they really need.

Adobe Photoshop Elements: $100-$120; It is a light version of Photoshop containing most functions used for photo manipulation. For many users who just take pictures casually, this is all they really need.

Adobe Photoshop CS2: $600+ retail; if you are a student and have a school ID, you can get the academic version (has everything the retail one has) for $300; this is image editing software used by many design companies, professional photographers, and corporations. People who take pictures casually don't need to buy this. If you need to do a lot of complex photo editing or decide to take pictures for money, you probably want to buy this. Also, if you decide to take pictures in the D70s's RAW format, this software can read that format.

staereo
07-14-2006, 04:48 PM
If someone wants to link to my list I made of software, that'd help. I'm not sure where I put it.

At least Eriol can give us a nikon viewpoint. yay!

Im pretty cure capture one does nikon as well, but you wont get certain features the canon software may have, like remote triggering???

Either way I was assuming the OP was referring to shooting tethered, which is what I do in studio sessions.

Oh well, thanks to Eriol for giving us the nikon-post. ^^

Bruce

Oklahoma
07-14-2006, 04:54 PM
Here is staereo's program list:

CLICK HERE (http://forums.cosplay.com/showpost.php?p=1465786&postcount=7)

Eriol
07-14-2006, 04:58 PM
If someone wants to link to my list I made of software, that'd help. I'm not sure where I put it.

We'd have to search for it through the serach functions, but that might be difficult. Did you leave a copy of the list somewhere else? Maybe you can put it on your studio website when it's finished?

EDIT: Oklahoma found it. Fast!


At least Eriol can give us a nikon viewpoint. yay!

Finally, I can be useful around here! heh

Im pretty cure capture one does nikon as well, but you wont get certain features the canon software may have, like remote triggering???

What is remote triggering? Is it the same as what I described with Nikon Capture (remote operation of the camera using the software)?

Either way I was assuming the OP was referring to shooting tethered, which is what I do in studio sessions.

Tethered to the computer or the shutter remote control? If tethered to a computer, I would think tethering the camera to a laptop is better than a desktop, since the laptop is more portable.

Oklahoma
07-14-2006, 05:30 PM
What is remote triggering? Is it the same as what I described with Nikon Capture (remote operation of the camera using the software)?


From what I understand it should be the same. I don't know about the nikon but when the canon is hooked to the computer and the software for remote shooting from the computer is running you can also use the wired remote that plugs into the camera and it will run like that only hooked to the computer and the images can be sent through the software remote capture to the computer only the camera is ran like normal with a remote line. I belive this is what staereo is talking about when he is saying tethered shooting.

Hope you understand what I just said. I've been spray painting and what may sound good to me may be really convulted. So if you have any questions on it I can answer it once I have aired out.

OOOOHH, look at the little fairies....:drunk:

staereo
07-14-2006, 07:09 PM
you can also use the wired remote that plugs into the camera and it will run like that only hooked to the computer and the images can be sent through the software remote capture to the computer only the camera is ran like normal with a remote line. I belive this is what staereo is talking about when he is saying tethered shooting.

Yes... both, kinda.. but ya thats what i mean.

When I shoot, im moving around a lot, so i only using remote triggering via the computer for long exposures and timed captures..... Which is what I meant by triggering...

But what I was saying about tethered, was as you guys understand. I hook the camera to the laptop (or desktop, depending on where Im shooting). I open my raw conversion program (for me this is Phase One Capture One), then I shoot via the camera, and the image transfers immediatly to my laptop without being stored on my card.

Now, being that I use capture one, some other neat things come of this.

First of all, my images are immediatly sorted into sessions when they transfer. I can then make preset adjustments to the raw conversion. So I take my first image, and I can adjust my white balance, etc, etc, etc to that picture, and make those settings the default settings for the rest of the shoot. Then, every time I take a shot, and it transfers to my laptop, it automatically adjusts each picture in the session, as its shot, to the settings I made on that first one. Every time I shoot, the image pops up on my screen completely pre adjusted for me to view. Instantaneous gratification. (Or, knowledge of a bad shot)

Bruce

Eriol
07-14-2006, 07:36 PM
Oklahoma and Staereo, I understand what both you are talking about. I think direct image transfer from camera to Nikon Capture in USB tethered PC remote mode is also possible. I haven't tried to see if that particular function of Nikon Capture is there. If I can remotely operate the camera from the software, I have to presume it can directly transfer the image to the computer instead of the memory card.

Houki
07-15-2006, 02:31 AM
Okay...That is a lot of information. I appreciate all the help. I am asking this because I want to shoot pictures at the conventions and have them printed out for the cosplayers within a few minutes. I hope!! *prays* I need something where I can adjust color and contrast if needed and get everything the right size and print them off. I will probably post the images online but the main goal is to get the picture to the cosplayer right then at the convention.

I will look into all these software and see what kind of software comes in with the my Camera.

staereo
07-15-2006, 07:19 AM
I'd put a time buffer in for them to come back and pick the images up. Setting your images up for proper 'prepress' and things takes time.

Allowing all of your workflow from capture to printing to be automated will severely affect the quality of your output.

Just a suggestion. ^^

Bruce

Eriol
07-15-2006, 11:30 AM
I will look into all these software and see what kind of software comes in with the my Camera.

All you will get with the camera is Nikon View and PictureProject. Every other software else I mentioned requires you to purchase separately. You should get a trial copy of Nikon Capture with the camera, as well. A trial copy will only work for 30 days and then require you to buy a license key to keep the software running permanently.

I also found out that the next version of Nikon Capture, called Nikon Capture NX, will be out at the end of the month for $150.

Demonsun
07-27-2006, 02:23 PM
woah houki, you want prints within a few minutes?
If you want fast prints then you will definately want a fast thermal printer, not any consumer level printer, the one that my dad rents for the local high school prom can spit out a 5x7 in about 20 secs. And we usually bring our own computer setup, with nikon capture feeding me the raws so I can tweak them then print them.

You should really purchase Nikon Capture or eye ones capture one, so that you can process pictures on the fly, it also helps to have a second person to process and print the photos.

Have you also thought about cost? Ink and paper can be very expensive.

it might be better for you to upload the files to a service like smugmug after editing the images, give the cosplayers a gallery where they can find their pictures and order prints, cds etc. and as many of them as they want. You set the prices, so that you can cover costs.

All you need to do is give them a nuber to identify their gallery and a password, works great for large event photography like a prom, or a convention.

staereo
07-27-2006, 03:12 PM
The hp 8250 does 4x6 in 14 seconds, 5x7 in 40 seconds or less....

its under 200 bucks

6 inks, each ink is $10 to replace, except black, which is double the quantity of the other colors, and as such is $20 to replace.

The vivera ink system on the 8250 uses a 2 direction pump so the inks dont get wasted on cleaning spraying. AFAIK, it is the *only* consumer printer that is capable of this. In addition, using archival or hp premium papers you can get 105+ years expected life. (When stored in archival storage.)

Not to mention, the printer has resolution higher than consumer labs offer.

It is not the best text printer (though blazing fast in draft mode, as it spits pages out faster than about every copy machine I've seen.) Nor is it the best monochrome printer in the world (but it does a fair job). It is a fantastic color printer.

Im sure others can beat it, but if youre going for speed, it is one of the fastest (if not THE fastest) consumer photo printer available. (And you'd be hard pressed to notice the color print quality between this printer and a professional level inkjet photo printer.

Bruce

Demonsun
07-27-2006, 05:19 PM
never liked how it reproduced color, always preferred thermal for that.
Although I also have another problem, HP's drivers on their consumer products have always seemed to me a bit dodgy printing photos under certain types of color profiles.

I have to admit though it's not a bad price, anywhere from 150-90 $
Good deal

staereo
07-27-2006, 05:35 PM
HP's line, much like most inkjets available in the consumer sector (to include top tier prosumer and affordable personal lab) tend to run best when you let their software control the color management. I find that when I allow programs like photoshop do the profiling, it never comes out anywhere near what I'm looking for. But if you allow send the information to the printer without software management, the printer does a pretty good job of color management all on its own.

Of course, the other option is very easy, but pricey. You can have your entire workflow color profiled professionally by a profiling service. This solves your color management perfectly. Much better than self-profiling systems allow.

When profiled properly the 8250 has a color output that is right on par for the size it uses. Its color is rated very nicely by photography resources. The black and white output isn't considered to be as impressive, but this is to be expected with only 1 greytone cartridge, and it's black.

It's all a matter of what youre doing with it. But cosplay is typically in color, and if youre looking for fast output and good color in a consumer printer, the 8250 is a great deal.

Consequently it won quite a few awards from various rating sources.

^^
Bruce

Oklahoma
07-27-2006, 05:43 PM
Also if you look around you can get the ink cheap. As staereo said you can get the cartridges for $10 a piece, but HP offers a package for $37 that includes the color ink and 150 sheets of CHEAP photopaper. Even if you throw out the photopaper, which is almost as thin as regular paper, that is still under 40 for all 5 ink tanks; black is of course seperate.

I have been considering this one for a lot of the reasons listed: fast printing, individual ink tanks, and price. staereo, assume you have one? I know some will run out before others depending on the images printed and it will vary each time, but how many prints can you get on average (4X6's) before you have to change the ink?

staereo
07-27-2006, 06:00 PM
lol... a lot. If you want to pm/email me your mailing address, I will send you some prints to check over.

I couldnt tell you exactly how much I get per cartridge, as I use more of some colors than others. I had printed out over 200 4x6s before I had to change my first cartridge. And even with all the printing I do for paperwork, I probably ran the equivalant of 400 4x6s AND 1500-2000 sheets of paperwork before I changed my black cartridge.

Also, be warned, Im pretty sure the multi-pack has less mL of ink in each cartridge than the lone cartridges. But it works well for an easy pack to go.

If I bring my printer with me for non managed proofs on location, I have a box I take with 2 of each inks in it. I've never had to use any of them yet, but its nice to have near your printer at home, because when you run out of a color, you have a spare. (In my case, 2, just in case) Then you can just go buy cartridges to replace the cartridges youve used.

You do save a LOT of ink by not having to clean your ink tubes out each time. Instead it returns the inks to their wells, in perfect conition, without ever reaching the nozzles and getting soiled.

^^

Demonsun
07-27-2006, 06:27 PM
I tend to shoot more black and white, but I do like to manage my color myself, especially because I shoot stuff for weddings And When I print Out the proofs I need them to look almost identical to the silver prints I get from my printer, So I tweak the color to match. I have found that My canon i9900 and my Schools epson r2400 seem to do better that the HP 8750 that my school has as well. when I'm using the archival matte and glossy papers that I use. HP doesn't support the color and ink profiles for the paper that I use really well, I like my canon, and the ink is only about 10-12 $ a unit, so it isn't that expensive, and although its more expensive, thats what student discounts are for ^_^

trabus
07-27-2006, 07:10 PM
If you have Windows XP SP2, Adobe currently has an open beta for their new photo management (and light editing) program called Lightroom. I've heard good things so far. It's free, so I'd say it's worth checking out.

http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/lightroom/

Demonsun
07-27-2006, 10:19 PM
Lightroom is pretty good, only problem I have with it is it crashes Waaay to often. usually when you actually try to process a Raw file, from a Nikon d200, or the d2x, haven't tried it with stuff taken with a d70 though, nor my canon d20.

Trelyon
08-01-2006, 09:24 PM
Also is there a way to connect the camera to your PC and get it downloading after 1 shot to edit and print rght there?


aye... also... if you get a HP bt450 Bluetooth adapter to the HP 8250 printer... you won't need your laptop or photochop... you could... take a pix... and print without moving away from your subject

(or Nikon pictBridge adapter to a canon i9900 printer ::winks:: they are getting you a $999 Nikon... what's $500 more)

also... upload to a bluetooh capable phone ;)

SolarTempest
08-04-2006, 04:51 PM
I'm using CS2 and it's awesome. Hefty price, but students get a discount at my university.

There's also Nikon Capture (I have v4), which you can hook up a computer/laptop to your camera and shoot. All shots are direct download to the computer and previewable right away.

It works pretty decent, but I don't have a laptop and I find flash cards to download shots a lot faster. Still, it's very convenient to be able to proof your shots with a laptop as you take them.