PDA

View Full Version : Should I take up photography?


Eilis Angelos
10-21-2006, 01:42 PM
I've been doing makeup based on someone's art lately and taking pics. I LOVE to try different makeup concepts and capture them. (For examples, see my DeviantArt (http://eilisangelos.deviantart.com/). This probably sounds like it's about makeup, but it's not.

Ok, to the point. A friend of mine suggested that I should look into taking up photography doing "concept/themed portrait photography". I'd like your opinions. Does this sound like a good idea to you? What all does this style entail? Is cosplay photography considered a valid form of this style of photography? Is it a bad idea for me to use a digital camera? (I'm saving up to buy a nice one. I want a high quality optical zoom.)

Anyway, advice, opinions and comments are more than welcome. Thanks in advance for the help!

impgard
10-21-2006, 02:48 PM
To me photography is a form of artistic expression. It is also very gratifying regardless of the subject matter and I have done some cosplay photography at conventions for fun. I think the type of photography you describe would be a logical extension of what you do now. So, I'd go for and see if you like it...of course there are other types of photography that you might get into if this doesn't appeal to you.

BTW, digital is the way to go now a days. The ease and flexibility of digital photography has revolutionized the art form.

staereo
10-21-2006, 04:48 PM
I gotta go with impgard here. I agree.

As I often do, I will expand with my opinions.

I urge you to explore any sort of artistic output you wish. There is no reason to let equipment limitations and style categories cage your creativity. Shoot whatever you wish and leave the sorting to the critics and viewers. When you shoot for a style, you box yourself in.

Now that I've made my supportive point clear, I want to delve into another thought that you may wish to explore, perhaps in addition to your photography if not seperate from it.

Stylists and make up artists have every bit a role in the production of images as the photographer and model. There is no reason to throw yourself into a role of a shot snapper if you would prefer to help create the image through artistic expression by style and composition.

Make up artists, and stylists, aren't so much about makeup. In fact, if I had a stylist or MUA arrive at the shoot intending on just tossing some makeup on the model, I would make sure never to use that MUA again. A model can do their own makeup about 98% of the time. What I want is an artist that creates something better than life on a living canvas. THIS is what its about to me. Stylists range from MUA to fashion coordinators, hair, etc..

I know people will attempt to disagree, but I will say that cosplay is NOT a valid style in the photography world. It would be categorized into either event photography, street photography, or fashion photography... (Or, from some less reputable forms, glamour photography.)

But as I said before, who cares where its classified. If you enjoy it, do it. If you worry about what other people will think concerning your work too much, you will find your artistic vision lost to a vision of the masses. While a photographer attempts to capture a viewer in their image, most photographers don't feel that you must do this by PLEASING the viewer.

Being an artist for a photographer may leave you feeling more pleased. Typically a shoot is coordinated by an art director. If not, it is coordinated by a photographer, HOWEVER, stylists and MUA have contacted ME with what they want, and then it is often their creativity that dominates a shoot. So you can still direct a shoot's creativity and output without being the one setting up the lighting. There is no reason you can't do whatever it is you enjoy to do for your own self gratification.

Money wise, there is no money in cosplay photography. (But I dont think that was your intent anyways.)

Digital is fine... It is the medium of today and the near future.

In any event, I wish you luck, and welcome any questions you may have in the future.

Bruce

(PS, make up art on the eyes as you have in your gallery, outside the cosplay world, is often earmarked by the term high fashion.)

Eilis Angelos
10-21-2006, 09:34 PM
Wow, that was long, but what a great read! Thank you so much for the encouragement and advice.

Photography still interests me, but I think that I was also leaning that way somewhat out of frustration that makeup doesn't seem to be considered an art form. It's one of my favorite forms of artistic expression and people (at art sites) tell me that I should be drawing things. This is what I'm good at and what I love to do. I love digital cameras because I can take bunches of pictures and have an immediate product for my hard work.

I guess I kinda feel the need to be validated as an artist and if getting involved in photography is the only way to do that, then so be it. I will readily wear my designs around in public, but they're not exactly guaranteed to be seen by anyone important, since I live in the middle of Nebraska. So... I'm babbling. I'll stop now.

Edit: PS I'll admit, I like to be in front of the camera more than behind it.

staereo
10-22-2006, 07:23 AM
Anytime.....

You *should* aim for this type of art. I'll tell you something else, outside of the fashion/entertainment hot spots, MUA are extremely hard to find. They are in high demand. Furthermore, a MUA usually walks away from a shoot with more money in his or her hand than I do as a photographer. Their rates are not far below photographers, and photographers often have to immediatly pay for the model and the location and the releases. Sooo, it's certainly every bit as lucrative as a photographer. At least at my level.

There is nothing wrong with you shooting your own work. In fact, I would say its about normal. Just because you dont use a photographer for all of your tests doesnt mean it isn't smart to capture them yourself. For sure dig one out. I know when I am looking for a MUA (though I usually have someone I keep on file), I want to see ideas they may have for the shoot. If they are able to submit digipics to give me a better idea, then I would think that is GREAT. I know I often work in the opposite fashion when discussing MU with a MUA. I take a picture and pull up photoshop and draw and airbrush a look I want over a models image. This doesnt mean I need to be a MUA, but it helps me to communicate with an associate to convey my interest. In general a cross-industry general knowledge of the areas involved in your production is extremely valuble. In fact, I wish I knew more about cosplay, because I often feel behind the 8 ball when shooting cosplay. I try to have a knowledge about things involved. Be it makeup, style, hair, fashion design, different sports, automobiles, etc. To understand other people's art helps me work within it better.

SOOO, shooting your work is only to be considered beneficial if you pursue art in the make up and style world.

You certainly don't need to be validated to be a make up artist. And if you want to be validated, it won't be with a camera. Photographer's are often a lost name in the production. Sure, in the industry their names and styles may be recognizable, but no more than top make up artists. Sure, if I said Ansel Adams you would know who I was talking about. But lets LOOK art other HUGE name photographers.

Jill Greenberg, Michael Grecco, Andrew Kolb, Paul Strand, Henrik Knudsen, William Klein, Walker Evans, Edward Weston, Man Ray. I mean... These aren't all typical household names... At least not like the models names which you hear over and over.

Soooo, no need to go for recognition through photography. You will get it doing what youre happy doing most. There are also websites that allow you to create profiles AS a makeup artist or stylist. The first link in my signature is one of MANY of those types of sites. That is a way to get localized exposure at the very least.

I hope this helps,
Bruce

JadeCat
10-24-2006, 09:59 PM
Photography still interests me, but I think that I was also leaning that way somewhat out of frustration that makeup doesn't seem to be considered an art form. It's one of my favorite forms of artistic expression and people (at art sites) tell me that I should be drawing things. This is what I'm good at and what I love to do. I love digital cameras because I can take bunches of pictures and have an immediate product for my hard work.

I guess I kinda feel the need to be validated as an artist and if getting involved in photography is the only way to do that, then so be it. I will readily wear my designs around in public, but they're not exactly guaranteed to be seen by anyone important, since I live in the middle of Nebraska. So... I'm babbling. I'll stop now.

Edit: PS I'll admit, I like to be in front of the camera more than behind it.

First, I absolutely LOVE photography, and I encourage people to take it up.

However, I also caution folks that there is a learning curve to learning photography, and, depending on how deep you dive, some monetary spending on it as well.

So, I definitely agree with what the others have posted.

I would ask you: What are your priorities? What do you want to do? How much do you want to get into photography?

That alone determines if you should get into photography or how much.

And it seems like you would much rather do Makeup work, and merely use the photography to showcase your work and what you can do with the makup. And learning photography will take a bit of time, and potentially time away from what you like doing (i.e the makeup work), so you have to take that into consideration.

As someone pointed out, you can also collaborate with a photographer to get those fashion makeup looks, and that way you can build your own portfolio.

Good luck.

Kira_Yamato
10-28-2006, 07:18 AM
I'm going to be an asshole and be really blunt about it.

No.

Get into something cheaper, like collecting classic Ferraris or buying Microsoft.


Seriously, though, it's fun, and it's a great thing to do for a living, but it's really hard work, and it's insanely expensive. Be warned, it's an addiction, I thought my habit of racing old sports cars was expensive until I became a photographer. I've spent over $3000 in the past month, and over $15,000 in the past year.

Jadenyuki
10-29-2006, 07:00 AM
I think it is a good idea because cosplay and photography can go hand in hand. by the way people that do not have pictures of their costumes they create may want some to take their pictures and pay money at times.