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Kandelon
03-26-2003, 10:26 PM
I am making a Vampire Hunter D costume and although foam worked well for Auron's big thick sword I doubt a sword as thin as D's would last long. So does anyone have a suggestion for a good strong, yet light and non-dangerous, material that would be good to use and still look good? Thanks.

Sarcasm-hime
03-27-2003, 03:16 AM
Try wood. It won't be super-thin, but the Kamui sword I made was only about 3/4 inch thick. You might also consider plastic or fiberglass, if you want to get into that...

http://sarcasm.fanfic.org/makingswords.html

MonoyashaJLA
03-27-2003, 09:01 AM
you could still stick with foam, But this time use about 3 layers of fiberglass apoxy resin for strength ^-^ You can purchase this at any marine/boat store

Kandelon
03-28-2003, 09:35 AM
Hmm... interesting. Thanks!

marsie
03-28-2003, 11:46 AM
Honestly I can not recall the sword so if you could throw up a picture, I might be able to help with the material.

I am a big fan of MDF. It is durable, flexable, and easy to cut and manipulate.

Nightmare
03-29-2003, 02:59 AM
I am personally a fan of wood. There are so many types to choose from, and you can techncally make it any shape and as strong as you want depending on what kind of wood that you use.

Kandelon
03-29-2003, 11:25 AM
This work?:

http://www.vampirehunterdbloodlust.com/images/gallery/d/d12.jpg

If that worked, that's what it looks like. 6 or 7 feet long and VERY thin. Need something that won't snap while transporting, carrying around all day, ect. Thanks for the help, by the way.

marsie
03-30-2003, 07:53 AM
I would use a piece of MDF( it is wood you can get it at any home improvement store that sells wood) and then reinforce it with resin.

There is no unbreakable material. If you can find plastic corner guards that might work as well.

Just don't go around commando like. Swinging it to and fro! ^.~

Kandelon
04-01-2003, 08:38 AM
Heh, I'll keep that in mind. Thanks.

Solo
03-04-2005, 08:13 PM
If your using fiberglass apoxy, do you have to finish it with bondo. I'm worried about lossing the shape of my armor, even after sanding if I do. If you look at the pic in my gallery you'll see why.

Nikostratos
03-06-2005, 05:53 AM
Hmmm for the sword, at a loss on any way to fiberglass it without making it dangerous :) so thatís out, wood would accurately be to thin to my knowledge, Iím not sure about the stuff that these guys are suggesting, and I know cons wouldnít let you carry a spun aluminum blade around a con. Plastic molding would be the only other thing I can think of, and that wouldnít be cost effective at all.
So far the MDF theory sounds the best, Iím not familiar with that type of wood at the moment, but I will definitely look into it!
Resin will definitely help out as far as strength, but be careful not to go overboard, it also adds weight!

Solo~
No way lmao
Bondo weighs a ton as well...
Bondo is used by people who cant put fiberglass properly the first time IMO

Yes bondo is some tough stuff...and its pretty cheap too, but if you just fiberglass it properly you usually only have to sand a total of an inch or so per square yard...

MORE FIBERGLASS! LESS BONDO!
Heh
Personal use opinion... its more expensive to do for larger props, but the results are a much higher quality prop.

Heh From my work with fiberglass, here is what I have found solo, this is also where people go wrong from what I hear from their horror stories...

1: Make sure u add the right amount of hardener! donít add extra to speed it up or less to slow it down... it doesnít work like that on the scale you would think.

2: if you are applying resin to any sort of foam [unsure of craft foam, i will have to test this] cover it with something, my favorite thing is duct tape as it adds strength and can usually let me get away with one layer of fiberglass. The reason for this is the resin will eat the foam otherwise and while it is setting, there will be large sinkholes in your prop [my theory on why all of the tutorials here by other ppl say to use bondo]

3: not in order of importance, Work in a well ventilated Area, and in old clothing! if you have long hair, tie it back and get it out of the way...

4: and i reiterate... Use the right amount of hardener... else you will have that sloppy mass of armor you were worried about...

5: keep an old cloth on hand to clean off any resin that gets on your skin. get it off while its wet and its good, wait and you will need some goo-gone or a similar product.

6: Trim off any frayed cloth before applying resin. This makes it much easier during the finishing stages of your project, and its much safer as well, fiberglass is pointy at the edges particularly in the frayed bits, so always trim them up.

7: When ever possible, work with a single piece of fiberglass clothe. This assures your end piece will not have any un-necessary bulges and makes for a much prettier and more professional looking piece.

8: If this is your first night at FIGHT CLUB, you HAVE to fight. Oh wait. nm... LMAO

9: Fiberglass on 'soft' forms, the first layer will hold to the form, but thatís about it, there isnít much cohesion to the form as a single layer, if you want it to hold its own shape without any backing add another layer of cloth, u can also use the heavyweight cloth, but more layers is still a good thing!

10: it helps to tape down the cloth so it doesnít peal off of your form after you apply the resin, only tape the back of the cloth however as you donít want to impede the resin on the front and sides of your item.

11: if you have any concerns or problems, ask someone who knows what they are doing before you continue... donít rush and put on multiple layers of cloth at once or do anything silly like that... as soon as you rush, the project dies with fiberglassing. It doesnít take much time you just have to pay attention to your work.

Heh hope this helps
Anything else I will address tomorrow
*Yawn*

Solo
03-06-2005, 10:03 PM
What if I want to put the epoxy directly on the base, no cloth strips. Currently the armor is made of plaster strips and I'm planning on adding plaster to smooth out the uneven layers in the plaster strips. Then I want to "paint on" the epoxy.
Would I still be able to paint on the epoxy layer?
Would it be really weighty (not considering the plaster)?
Would it strengthen the overall armor?
Would I be able wear it without getting left over fiberglass in my costume/skin?

Nikostratos
03-07-2005, 01:12 AM
What if I want to put the epoxy directly on the base, no cloth strips.
you can but the cloth will add alot more strength than the resin alone


Currently the armor is made of plaster strips and I'm planning on adding plaster to smooth out the uneven layers in the plaster strips. Then I want to "paint on" the epoxy.
What i reccomend is finishing it as you plan, and using that as a positive mold for the fiberglass...
use 2 layers of the cloth, just use a little extra resin on the first layer to give it a little extra strength, then apply the second layer so the grain has a nice x shape to it, and more resin! for the last layer, after everything is said and done, you dont want to see the grain in the fiberglass. if u want to do this, [it would end up with armor that is much lighter, stronger, with the kicker of having a mold to make it again at will.] let me know and i can point you in the right direction...


Would I still be able to paint on the epoxy layer?
if u really want to... use cloth though if your doing that...


Would it be really weighty (not considering the plaster)?
its[resin] weightyin compairison to fiberglass[cloth]. not plaster.


Would it strengthen the overall armor?
yes, it would, but not nearly as much as the additional cloth would, again, look at my recomendation


Would I be able wear it without getting left over fiberglass in my costume/skin?

um, with what your wanting. your not fiberglassing to begin with... you are resin reinforcing.
I have never had any problems with wearing fiberglass armor though, i have also never used unfinished fiberglass though. all of my armors have been fully sanded, painted, and otherwise sealed, unless you are using unfinished props anyways it really shouldnt be an issue.


And just for refrence,
Fiberglass is a glass based Fiber, or the 'cloth'.

Celebrimbor
03-07-2005, 01:30 AM
I am making a Vampire Hunter D costume and although foam worked well for Auron's big thick sword I doubt a sword as thin as D's would last long. So does anyone have a suggestion for a good strong, yet light and non-dangerous, material that would be good to use and still look good? Thanks.

Mithril. You can find a lot of it in Felwood.

WoW aside, there is a material I've started looking into. It's called plastic lumber.

http://american-plasticlumber.com/

As a material, it's similiar to plexi in it's ability to be carved and sculpted, but it doesn't have the hideous tendency of plexi to flex and snap. You can drill though it, saw it, and even router it.

I haven't worked with it in props yet, but I have seen it used.