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Unread 10-05-2011, 11:47 PM   #16
strifevalentine
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Ty Ty :3 this is very helpful <3
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Unread 10-12-2011, 03:26 PM   #17
CherriPetalz
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THANK YOU SO MUCH! I just bought a pattern and I was so confused! I have a question though, how would you alter a pattern? for example, I'm using a men's patten for a cosplay and the small is just 2 inches off for all of my measurements.
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Unread 10-12-2011, 05:03 PM   #18
myalchod
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If it's a consistent 2", you can try to size the pattern down -- look at how the cutting lines get smaller through the different sizes and basically extrapolate from there. (If each size is about 1" different around, you'd go down two sizes, or so forth.) Use muslin or some other cheap fabric to mock it up to make sure it fits -- you're better off cutting too large and taking it in by pinning and marking when you try things on, repeating as many times as you need to get the fit you like. If you're a different amount off in different spots, adjust differently at key points and curve your lines between. (Disclaimer -- this is just what's worked for me in the past, not any proper method AFAIK.)
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Unread 10-24-2011, 02:39 PM   #19
GroundControl
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This tutorial is great! I'm looking forward to trying this out now.

This only question I have is: if you are a woman making a men's jacket with the intent on wearing it, then would it be a better idea to find a pattern for a women's jacket similar to that of a men's jacket, or would it be better to use a pattern for a men's jacket?
Are the measurements on patterns for men's clothes different than the measurements for women's clothes? How do you go about finding a men's pattern that fits a woman's body?
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Unread 10-24-2011, 03:22 PM   #20
Syagria
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GroundControl View Post
This tutorial is great! I'm looking forward to trying this out now.

This only question I have is: if you are a woman making a men's jacket with the intent on wearing it, then would it be a better idea to find a pattern for a women's jacket similar to that of a men's jacket, or would it be better to use a pattern for a men's jacket?
Are the measurements on patterns for men's clothes different than the measurements for women's clothes? How do you go about finding a men's pattern that fits a woman's body?
Hm. Honestly, I've never actually looked specifically at a men's pattern before, only women's and unisex (like pajama pants and robes). My thought is: all the information on a pattern is based on direct measurements in inches or centimeters, thus finding an appropriately-sized pattern for men should not be any different, so long as the measurements for the person wearing it have been accurately taken.

The place you'll run into trouble in regards to your first question is that the tailoring on a women's jacket and on a men's jacket will be quite different. Women's jackets are typically tailored to accomodate the rounded bustline and the narrower waist. Men's jackets are generally broader in the shoulders. If, as a woman, you try to follow a men's jacket pattern straight up, you'll likely find that it's baggy across the back and in the shoulders. Men are much more straight-up-and-down and women are usually more curvy, so if you make a jacket off a men's pattern, it may end up looking very boxy. This was popular in the 80's (women's power suits in the 80s all had shoulder pads and very square cuts to make them more masculine as part of a feminist push to indicate that women could compete in the business field on equal footing), so your resulting garment may also look rather dated.

If you're new to sewing, it's probably best to get a pattern more specific to a woman's proportions. After a little bit of experience, you'll start to get a natural feel for how things are cut for women, and you can use that experience to adjust a men's pattern to fit women.
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Unread 10-24-2011, 03:42 PM   #21
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wow who knew trying to make a costume would be this much work but thanks it has shed some light on what I need to do but just gave me a who load of more questions :P.
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Unread 10-24-2011, 07:48 PM   #22
GroundControl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syagria View Post
Hm. Honestly, I've never actually looked specifically at a men's pattern before, only women's and unisex (like pajama pants and robes). My thought is: all the information on a pattern is based on direct measurements in inches or centimeters, thus finding an appropriately-sized pattern for men should not be any different, so long as the measurements for the person wearing it have been accurately taken.

The place you'll run into trouble in regards to your first question is that the tailoring on a women's jacket and on a men's jacket will be quite different. Women's jackets are typically tailored to accomodate the rounded bustline and the narrower waist. Men's jackets are generally broader in the shoulders. If, as a woman, you try to follow a men's jacket pattern straight up, you'll likely find that it's baggy across the back and in the shoulders. Men are much more straight-up-and-down and women are usually more curvy, so if you make a jacket off a men's pattern, it may end up looking very boxy. This was popular in the 80's (women's power suits in the 80s all had shoulder pads and very square cuts to make them more masculine as part of a feminist push to indicate that women could compete in the business field on equal footing), so your resulting garment may also look rather dated.

If you're new to sewing, it's probably best to get a pattern more specific to a woman's proportions. After a little bit of experience, you'll start to get a natural feel for how things are cut for women, and you can use that experience to adjust a men's pattern to fit women.
Thanks so much for the info! I looked through a bunch of patterns my mom has and there's a women's jacket I can alter a bit (less altering than what would be needed for a men's jacket to fit properly). I'm not really new to sewing, but I am new to using and altering patterns, so I think a women's jacket pattern would suit my skills best.
Thanks again!
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Unread 11-05-2011, 02:52 AM   #23
wingsofapapercr
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this might be slightly off topic, but does anyone have any tips on how to store sewing patterns? I can use them fine but I find i'm always buying new ones because I lose the pieces I cut out
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Unread 11-07-2011, 09:14 AM   #24
Syagria
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wingsofapapercr View Post
this might be slightly off topic, but does anyone have any tips on how to store sewing patterns? I can use them fine but I find i'm always buying new ones because I lose the pieces I cut out
Personally, I take all the cut pattern pieces, fold them carefully, and put them back in the pattern envelope with the instructions and the unused pieces. I keep all the envelopes in a row in plastic tote box which is starting, unfortunately, to over flow When I want to re-use the pattern, I just take the pieces out, iron them again, and they're ready to go.

If this isn't working for you (sometimes they get scrunched up or torn, especially after lots of use), my friend's method of pattern storage is to cut the envelope up the side, open it, and paste it to the front of a manila folder or non-padded mailing envelope. Then she puts all the pattern pieces into the folder or envelope, and these can be easily organized in either a filing cabinet or in a milk crate, using hanging file folders.
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Unread 11-18-2011, 11:35 PM   #25
DeAnna Designs
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I keep my patterns in a filing cabinet. If I can't get them back into the envelope, and for any patterns that I make, I put them in a manila envelope with the drawing or original package taped to the front.

Here's a tip for a pattern you use frequently-- you can get Freezer Paper at the grocery store and iron it to the back of your patterns. Use a pressing cloth or you'll ruin your iron and board! It sticks to the pattern and reinforces the flimsy pattern tissue. I never cut away any sizes so I can make it to any size I need.

You can get a basic pattern drafting text book to learn how to add ease and size up and down patterns and how to change them from one style to the next. You can't just take off 2" all the way around and expect it to fit.

Good luck!
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Unread 01-01-2012, 07:45 PM   #26
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You can also use a plastic Quart size baggie to protect any pattern from water, friends with drinks, and damage. This is also more helpful when I've done any modifications to a pattern and they don't fit in the envelope anymore.

I also organize my patterns first by size, then by item (Jackets/outerwear, Casual pants, Eveningwear, Uniforms...etc.)

I also will group a specific pattern with the materials (Fabric, thread, Buttons, wire etc.) for the costume it goes to, this enables me to work through a costume and see what patterns will work for an outfit best and also helps me remember what supplies I have so I don't forget and buy a second set of buttons for example.

Also on the topic of fabric...
If you think that you will even accidentally put a costume in the wash or you have a forgetful person who might be trying to be helpful by washing your costume for you in your life, make sure to wash any fabric you are going to use in a costume.
This is a big thing because if you do not prewash and you go through the work of putting the costume together then it gets shrunk in the wash.....it gets a little hairy from there.

This issue is that many different fabrics and their fibers act differently when washed but your specific fabrics traits are not completely predictable....
If you are unsure of how your fabric will react to any treatment from washing and drying to bleaching and dying, I cannot stress enough to do a piece test

a piece test is taking a pretty good size piece of the fabric you intend to work with and testing it with whatever situation you want to put it through. This will give you a better idea of how the fabric as a whole will react.
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Unread 01-02-2012, 01:13 AM   #27
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Can I just say that I love you all? You've saved me a good deal of confusion in the near future.
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Unread 02-02-2012, 08:01 PM   #28
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Unread 02-08-2012, 06:30 PM   #29
luvnanashi
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Thank you so much~~ I'm preparing to make my first ever cosplay so I know I'll constantly refer back to this very helpful tutorial!!

Do you have any advice about combining different patterns together? (E.g. the patterns for the collar, the torso, and the end of a jacket are from three different patterns, how do I combine them?)

It probably has a lot to do with intuition, etc. but I'd like a general guideline that I can rely on before I screw things up. >.<
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Unread 02-09-2012, 01:24 AM   #30
DeAnna Designs
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combining patterns

The easiest way to do anything to patterns is to copy them onto craft paper, or use paper grocery bags taped together. First trace the size you are using then remove the seam allowance, or at least draw the seam allowance on the pattern so you can get a measurement of what it will be when you sew it together. Then you can easily match your patterns to make sure they will fit each other....and you. Remember if you have a body measurement you have to add "ease" to it so it the fabric will fit around your body. For example you need at least 3-5" ease around your hips because when you sit down your hips are bigger than when you stand up. So, if your hips measure 38" around the fullest part of your butt then you'll need the hip measurement of your pattern to be about 41-42". Of course, if you are working with stretch material the ease is different. You don't need much, if any, ease in a pair of tights or bodysuit made of stretchy fabric because it will stretch with you when you move.

It's always a good idea to go by the measurements given on the pattern instead of the size, especially if you are using vintage patterns because sizes are all different. What was a size 12 in the 1950s is now about a size 4. Always go by what the measurements say and always use your biggest measurement of hips, bust, waist to choose the right size pattern. You can always make the other parts smaller in the fitting stage.

If it's a really important project be prepared to make a mock up of less expensive fabric so you can get the fit right before cutting your final fabric. Good Luck
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Thanks!
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