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Unread 11-23-2012, 07:14 PM   #1
Tzigana
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Satin in Snow?

I will have completed my cosplay in January. I have a photographer who wants to do a photoshoot in the snow. My question is because this is a huge crepe-back satin costume with a giant satin train, would it be ok in the snow? This polyester satin. I heard that getting satin wet is bad. Can anyone let me know what they know on this topic?
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Unread 11-23-2012, 07:31 PM   #2
Mangochutney
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The important thing is that it's polyester. Polyester doesn't give a damn about getting wet unlike, say, silk--that's where the notion of water being especially bad for satin comes from. You'll be fine.
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Unread 11-23-2012, 11:59 PM   #3
Rainbowgasm
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I second that as long as its 'fake' satin, then you'll be a-okay!
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Unread 11-24-2012, 09:43 AM   #4
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I have very little experience with snow (I live in Texas) but I have participated in bridal photography in and around wet areas.
** You need a handler for your train!** Two would be even better.
A couple sheets or small tarps will be useful for putting down under your train before it's placed on the ground. Once you can see how wet the fabric is, it'll show in the pictures too. Depending on your plan this might be okay, but be sure to get dry photos first. You can do face close ups after your hem is soaked, but trying for full length after things are wet will not turn out as well.

Once wet, your dress is significantly more subject to getting dirty. A speck of dirt can be brushed off a dry fabric and leave no residue, drop a dirt crumb on a wet dress and watch it turn to a muddy streak.
Chances are you will need to launder it after your photo shoot, so long as it was made reasonably well this should be okay. Expect a dry cleaners to charge more for big dresses.
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Unread 11-25-2012, 08:41 AM   #5
char99char
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I saw you in the Rachel Alucard cosplay last year at Ohayocon - looking forward to seeing what you've done this year!
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Unread 11-25-2012, 11:38 AM   #6
Tzigana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by char99char View Post
I saw you in the Rachel Alucard cosplay last year at Ohayocon - looking forward to seeing what you've done this year!

Thank you so much. I certainly try. This one will be huge.
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Unread 11-25-2012, 11:39 AM   #7
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Penlowe- That is something I did not consider (how the wet spots will show in photographs). I will definitely pass that on to the photographer. The issue with dry cleaning is that I have ribbon around the edges (about 40 yards of it) that have been applied with E6000. I read you cannot dry clean E6000. Do you know if that is the case?

Rainbowgasm & MangoChutneye- Thank you. I was definitely worried because I read that satin cannot get wet. I figured it was with silk satin, but had to be sure because despite being polyester, it is still good quality and fairly pricey satin. I'd hate to ruin my cosplay.
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Unread 11-26-2012, 11:06 AM   #8
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Quote:
that have been applied with E6000
:facepalm:

No, E6000 is not dry clean-able because it is flammable, it should never be used on garments, period. It's meant for objects that will not come in contact with food.

After I read your post I sat here and yelled at you for five minutes. You have talent, but are selling yourself short by cutting corners and not improving your skills with proper sewing techniques. Rome wasn't built in a day and even Pablo Picasso went to school to learn about art, practice practice practice. If you like the praise you are getting now, just think how much bigger and better it will be when it's something launderable that you can wear two dozen times then sell for a couple hundred bucks. Make that the ultimate goal of each costume you make and it'll make the practice pieces not so tedious.
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Unread 11-26-2012, 05:31 PM   #9
Emrys
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzigana View Post
The issue with dry cleaning is that I have ribbon around the edges (about 40 yards of it) that have been applied with E6000. I read you cannot dry clean E6000. Do you know if that is the case?
E6000 Product Details:
- "Itís washer and dryer safe."
- CAUTION ADVISORIES OR SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS: Do not dry clean.
- TEMPERATURE RECOMMENDATIONS/LIMITATIONS: Performs best when applied at 70 to 85 degrees F. When fully cured, product can withstand temperatures between -40 and 150 degrees F.
[ http://www.michaels.com/E-6000%C2%AE...efault,pd.html ]

- Flammability: NONE, this product is non-flammable when cured.
[ http://www.eclecticproducts.com/e6000_retail.htm ]

- Can Amazing E-6000 be used on Styrofoamô?
No. E-6000 Series adhesives are not recommended for use on any polystyrene, polyethylene or polypropylene plastics.
[ http://www.eclecticproducts.com/e6000_retail_faqs.htm ]
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Unread 11-30-2012, 03:19 AM   #10
VickyAmis
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I think that would be really cold...
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Unread 11-30-2012, 02:06 PM   #11
Tzigana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penlowe View Post
:facepalm:

No, E6000 is not dry clean-able because it is flammable, it should never be used on garments, period. It's meant for objects that will not come in contact with food.

After I read your post I sat here and yelled at you for five minutes. You have talent, but are selling yourself short by cutting corners and not improving your skills with proper sewing techniques. Rome wasn't built in a day and even Pablo Picasso went to school to learn about art, practice practice practice. If you like the praise you are getting now, just think how much bigger and better it will be when it's something launderable that you can wear two dozen times then sell for a couple hundred bucks. Make that the ultimate goal of each costume you make and it'll make the practice pieces not so tedious.
I appreciate that you think that I have talent. I apologize if my method offended you, it's just that this is my third ever cosplay. This being the case, when I asked a cosplayer who had previous done this costume, she suggested that E6000 was a great adhesive for the ribbon. It did not occur to me to sew on the ribbon because I was trying to make it seamless. I do hope to improve on this cosplay for future conventions, this was simply the method that I had chosen to apply the ribbon. Again, I did not view it as a shortcut, just merely means to put the ribbon on without a seam.

Thank you, though, for the encouragement to improve my methods. Simply a beginner's mistake.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emrys
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzigana
The issue with dry cleaning is that I have ribbon around the edges (about 40 yards of it) that have been applied with E6000. I read you cannot dry clean E6000. Do you know if that is the case?
E6000 Product Details:
- "Itís washer and dryer safe."
- CAUTION ADVISORIES OR SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS: Do not dry clean.
- TEMPERATURE RECOMMENDATIONS/LIMITATIONS: Performs best when applied at 70 to 85 degrees F. When fully cured, product can withstand temperatures between -40 and 150 degrees F.
[ http://www.michaels.com/E-6000%C2%AE...efault,pd.html ]

- Flammability: NONE, this product is non-flammable when cured.
[ http://www.eclecticproducts.com/e6000_retail.htm ]

- Can Amazing E-6000 be used on Styrofoamô?
No. E-6000 Series adhesives are not recommended for use on any polystyrene, polyethylene or polypropylene plastics.
[ http://www.eclecticproducts.com/e6000_retail_faqs.htm ]
I did go and read the back of the package and found this same information. I appreciate it. I also found it alarming that it apparently causes cancer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VickyAmis
I think that would be really cold...
Yes, I think it will be, but it will be a nice contrast to the long black skirt. I think it will be worth a few minutes of cold. You get used to it in Ohio, though without nearly as much practice as the more northern states.
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Unread 12-01-2012, 11:16 AM   #12
Penlowe
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Quote:
I did go and read the back of the package and found this same information. I appreciate it. I also found it alarming that it apparently causes cancer.
as long as you aren't eating it or smearing it on your eyeballs and mucous membranes, you are fine.

I know I can come across harsh, I'm sorry, bear in mind I'm old. When I was your age the only cosplay that existed was for Star Trek fans and the internet was something dudes at MIT used to discuss quantum physics in mail subscription groups. Back then there really was only traditional sewing methods ever being taught, whether at home or in classes.

While YouTube and the internet in general is wonderful for the ability to share techniques and teach people stuff (I learned to crochet that way) it also allows really bad ideas and stupid methods to get passed around too, and often with just as much 'authority' as traditional, centuries proven method, advice. So, my advice from this point forward is:
Consider the source
Look at what they have done with a critical eye. Think about before, during, and after wearing or using the item/ technique in question. Try a practice piece on scrap. Don't take everything you read as law, even what I say.
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