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Unread 02-07-2013, 06:29 PM   #1
lovesexnpocky
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Who's good with Knits? :D

Hey guys how's it going!

So Knits and I are not on good speaking terms, after the last convention, so I thought I would come here and get some input on what I should do, as I intend to make this costume again!

This past Nekocon I made Korra from The Legend Of Korra, and it turned out really well! But the shirt was a huge problem. I made it out of interlock knit, it fit beautifully, but the trim... Here's a picture so you can see what I mean:

The white around the arms and neck

Anyway, the shirt itself, minus the white trim, fit perfectly! The collar stayed up, and it looked great! But the moment I put on the trim, the collar stretched out, the arms... ugh... I used the same material to do the edging with, used a stretch needle and a zigzag stitch...

I work at a fabric store so I have everything at my fingertips with a discount so I will take ANY advice at all! I would really appreciate it. And any tips with knits you might have! Thank you guys so much!
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Unread 02-07-2013, 06:55 PM   #2
Evil Bishounen
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It would help if you posted a photo of the shirt you already made, but...

When attaching a separate knit trim, the length of the trim needs to be a little shorter than the edge you're sewing it to. (And I'm talking stitch lines, not raw edges.) You stretch the trim as you sew it down so it'll fit, and distribute it as evenly as you can. This will cause that edge to cinch instead of warp, because the trim is trying to contract to its original shape. The shirt fabric might look funky and rippled when it's not on you, but when you put the shirt on, it'll stretch back out.

If the knit you're using doesn't have enough rebound on its own, you could sew narrow elastic in there too.

If you have a serger with differential feed, make use of it.
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Unread 02-07-2013, 07:25 PM   #3
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About that YEAH... I never got around to taking a picture of my own, and my friend and I have only been able to find on picture of us (after a billion x_X hate when that happens! lol Actually, give me a moment...)

So I stretch the trim, not the shirt... The problem I ran into was once I sewed the trim on, the collar fell open. Let me show you the picture I have and you would likely be able to figure out where I went wrong.

But thank you for the info, I am looking into getting a serger so I will look for that!
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Unread 02-07-2013, 07:28 PM   #4
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Here is the pic, hope you can see it all right
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Unread 02-07-2013, 08:13 PM   #5
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Okay yeah, what I mentioned will solve the problem of the armscye gaping open. Also, did the armscye fit snugly -before- you attached the trim? If it didn't, you'll need to remove the excess to further reduce that gappage.

The neck is a bit trickier because it's not a solid ring. Because it's open in the front, you don't have any tension across the front of the neck to hold it in place or keep the collar straight up.

Also, think in terms of fabric recoil: when you stretch a knit, it wants to return to its original shape. The shortest distance to do so is a straight line. That's probably why your collar points are turning down and everything's pulling away from your neck.

My thought is to break up the direction of the trim fabric at the collar corners and the center of the front neck. You also might want to initially pattern the neck so that it's more closed to begin with, allowing it to gap on your neck just by virtue of the fabric's natural pull. Of course, this is stuff you'd have to experiment with, since I'm not able to physically handle your fabric.
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Unread 02-07-2013, 08:56 PM   #6
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I can adjust the arms more, thanks for the help!

If I kept it turtleneck style, and not cut it until I put the trim on, perhaps? But I see what you'tr saying. I will get some knits and start practicing ideas thanks again for all the input!
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Unread 02-08-2013, 12:40 PM   #7
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Alternatively, you could experiment with using fabric paint on the collar. It would be lighter than extra fabric, which might help the collar stay up properly. If you really want to use a fabric trim, you could try using a knit interfacing underneath the whole thing to give it a little more structure and stability.
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Unread 02-10-2013, 01:07 PM   #8
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I knew that I was going to have that same problem when I made mine, so I actually tried batiking. I bought soy wax flakes from Dharma because it's a very flexible wax (which means less crackling) and the melting point is low enough that hot tap water will melt it, so it's approved to go down drains without problems. I then covered my dress form in foil and put on the undyed shirt (you could use pillows or rolls of cloth in plastic, so long as it's the size of your arms and neck) and very very carefully used a paintbrush to apply the wax everywhere that I wanted to stay white. I then dyed the shirt blue with RIT dye and removed the wax! This is what I ended up with:

http://harmoniccosplay.deviantart.co...City-320595216

I still needed a piece of invisible beading elastic to hold the neck closed. It really, really wants to fall down. Since that picture was taken, I've moved the elastic to halfway down instead of only at the top. It replicates the shape better.

This is a more time consuming method, but it allowed the knit to keep all of the stretch without me really having to fuss with getting the trim just so.
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Unread 02-24-2013, 10:29 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harmonyisarine View Post
I knew that I was going to have that same problem when I made mine, so I actually tried batiking. I bought soy wax flakes from Dharma because it's a very flexible wax (which means less crackling) and the melting point is low enough that hot tap water will melt it, so it's approved to go down drains without problems. I then covered my dress form in foil and put on the undyed shirt (you could use pillows or rolls of cloth in plastic, so long as it's the size of your arms and neck) and very very carefully used a paintbrush to apply the wax everywhere that I wanted to stay white. I then dyed the shirt blue with RIT dye and removed the wax! This is what I ended up with:

http://harmoniccosplay.deviantart.co...City-320595216

I still needed a piece of invisible beading elastic to hold the neck closed. It really, really wants to fall down. Since that picture was taken, I've moved the elastic to halfway down instead of only at the top. It replicates the shape better.

This is a more time consuming method, but it allowed the knit to keep all of the stretch without me really having to fuss with getting the trim just so.
Oh I know what you're talking about! That same technique is used to make batik fabrics! Thanks for the suggestion, your Korra came out fantastic.

I'm curious now what kind of fabric did you use for the top? Specifically, what brand if you recall? I used an interlock knit and the collar held fantastic UNTIL I put the collar trim on. >> But I like the idea of batiking it, or possibly painting it!
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Unread 02-24-2013, 10:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by risamori View Post
Alternatively, you could experiment with using fabric paint on the collar. It would be lighter than extra fabric, which might help the collar stay up properly. If you really want to use a fabric trim, you could try using a knit interfacing underneath the whole thing to give it a little more structure and stability.
I'm finally utilizing the interfacing chart at work >___< Who knew? But I do like the idea of painting it. I think I am gonna try that here soon! *plots* Thanks for the idea!
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Unread 02-25-2013, 02:29 PM   #11
harmonyisarine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesexnpocky View Post
Oh I know what you're talking about! That same technique is used to make batik fabrics! Thanks for the suggestion, your Korra came out fantastic.

I'm curious now what kind of fabric did you use for the top? Specifically, what brand if you recall? I used an interlock knit and the collar held fantastic UNTIL I put the collar trim on. >> But I like the idea of batiking it, or possibly painting it!
That's exactly the technique! A bonus is that I now have supplies to try my hand at batiking patterns onto fabric, which I've always wanted to do.

As far as my fabric, I used a wool jersey. I like to try to keep my materials similar to what the character would have, and Water Tribe and wool just go together very well (the boots and butt-cape are both suede trimmed in rabbit fur, with Angelus leather painted cuffs and linen for the pants). The cheapest I wool could find at the time was from Mood, so I ordered a yard online. http://www.moodfabrics.com/index.php...lms=&vbra nd=

It's not the most practical option if you work in a fabric store, but I adore wool. At that weight, it's not even very hot and this particular weave didn't itch. It did make dyeing and removing the wax harder, since I couldn't just put it in hot water till the wax melted off, and the left armhole is permanently a bit warped because I messed up... but it's pretty minor. ^_^
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