Go Back   Cosplay.com > Cosplay Construction > Props/Accessories/Armor

Reply
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Unread 02-11-2013, 03:13 PM   #1
Tesh-chan
Finally changed my Avatar
 
Tesh-chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 147
Ramona Flowers Hammer Help

Hello there. The other Hammer threads are a few years old so I thought Iíd make a new one.

Iím cosplaying Ramona for Anime Boston and was wondering if it were possible to construct the hammer out of the materials I bought. I would like the hammer to look more like it does in the graphic novel rather than the movie, a rectangle on top of a wooden dowel.

I have a long wooden dowel and 2 styrofoam blocks that I was thinking of somehow gluing together with the dowel sandwiched in between. A tutorial I looked at suggested using some kind of base too, which Iím still looking for. I was thinking of covering both blocks with duct tape after I made an indent and using hot glue.

Do you think hot glue is a strong enough glue to hold the blocks together?

Another tutorial I looked at suggested using paper mache, but Iím afraid that it might crack if it bumps into something.

I kinda wish the weather were nicer so that I could spray paint outside, but it gives me time to think about how Iím going to approach this.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

And here's an image in case anyone needs to see: http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__...onasHammer.jpg
__________________
~Attending Anime Boston 2013!~


Planned Cosplays:

Ramona Flowers - Scott Pilgrim (graphic novel version)
Tesh-chan is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Unread 02-11-2013, 03:55 PM   #2
animenerd93
Neko Neko Chi CHi
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,789
hot glue will melt styrofoam, youll need a glue that is made for styrofoam (michaels sells one). i wouldnt use duct tape just becuase it'll leave a weird texture. enough layers of paper mache will do the trick and wont break too bad with bumps
__________________
Cosplays~~~~~~
AX Cosplays!!!!
Adelheid (KHR!)- 85% done
Fem!Austrian War Succesion France (Hetalia/Nyotalia)- 10% done
Fem!Izaya (Drrr!)- 90% done
Magent!Teto (Vocaloid)- 95% done
animenerd93 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-11-2013, 05:15 PM   #3
verdatum
Extremely registered user
 
verdatum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,305
I used to sneer at paper mache, but these days, I'm a convert, it just needs to be done properly.

Most paper mache you see only uses newsprint, which is a lightweight fragile paper. Most paper mache you see is hollow which is fragile unless it's spherical or egg-shaped. When you give it a foam core, it resists deformation, and deformation is what leads to cracks. Most paper mache you see looks horrible, because no one has bothered to properly surface it. Surfacing is the process of hiding all the seam lines wrinkles, dents, and other flaws so the surface is ready to be painted.

So make it out of styrofoam, wrap it 3 layers of heavy porous paper, such as grocery bags, saturated (but not oversaturated) in paper mache paste. If you get any airbubbles that can't be pressed down, they weaken the piece and ideally need to be cut out and filled in once it dries. So really try to push out all the air bubbles. Scrapers help with this. Once dry, you can fix any major flaws with lumps of paperclay or wood putty. Apply it in excess so there's a hill to sand down. Major highspots can be sanded away with 80 grit sandpaper (give or take) but it's often easier to build up with a putty and sand that then it is so sand through paper strips. Anyway, once major flaws are adressed, to get a smooth surface, you can either brush it with layer after layer of gesso, or as I prefer, water down some paperclay with white glue and a bit of water until it's like heavy paint. Brush a layer all over the the surface and let that dry. Then sand the surface lightly with 180 grit then 220. If you think it's smooth, paint it with primer. This reveals flaws that are harder to see. If you see flaws and want to fix them, then repeat the steps as needed, otherwise, you are ready to paint. Some flaws are appropriate; you'll never see a flawless mallet in the real world.

You might want to look at a piece of wood and use a liner brush to paint natural grain lines over your wood-colored basecoat of choice, or you can just paint it brown or black and leave it be.
__________________
Founder Special FX wiki http://fx.wikia.com
verdatum is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-11-2013, 06:28 PM   #4
Altrus
I love dogs!
 
Altrus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 462
Why not use a foam core coated with bondo? I'm not personally familiar with paper mache so I can't comment on if it's efficacious, but bondo tends to look very solid and weighty when finished, it's sturdy, and is great for carving detail into. Just apply it patiently and sand it smooth, then work in all the details you need with a dremel. Fair warning: I've never seen bondo used on Styrofoam (usually it's EVA foam) and it creates heat while curing, so if this sounds appealing, I'd test it out first on a spare section of foam.
__________________
"The important thing is no one was hurt... No one who counts."
Altrus is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-11-2013, 07:04 PM   #5
verdatum
Extremely registered user
 
verdatum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,305
Bondo autobody filler putty works to make a smooth surface, but since it has no reinforcement, it is brittle. With only foam behind it, you either need a really thick layer or a random accidental bash will make it crack and start to crumble. It's also a little too thick when applying it and quick to set up, making it hard to spread evenly over a large surface. The result is a lot of sanding. Followed by another round of putty once you uncover all the little air bubbles that you just sanded down to. It's also nasty stuff that shouldn't be used in significant quantities indoors.

If you want to save a bit of drying time at the cost of more money, you can leave out all the parts about paperclay and spread bondo over the paper mache. Spatula on a thin layer (~1/16''). It sets about 10 minutes after mixing, and then you can sand. It's easy to sand at first and grows harder over the next 24 hours or so.

You should not use Bondo directly on top of styrofoam as the monomers eat away at the foam, creating a weak-spot beneath. You need something to act as a barrier. This can be paper mache or acrylic paint or gesso, just as long as the bondo and the foam don't directly touch.
__________________
Founder Special FX wiki http://fx.wikia.com
verdatum is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-11-2013, 07:16 PM   #6
Altrus
I love dogs!
 
Altrus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 462
Thanks for the clarification on that. I've used it on reinforced EVA foam without problems but not styrofoam. I'd hate to lead someone wrong! My only dissent would be the bit about application. If you're patient when applying bondo, doing small areas at a time, and take the time beforehand to trim protrusions off while it's curing, you can save yourself an incredible amount of sanding. The biggest mistake I made when I started with bondo was over-application. It's definitely sanding intensive either way, I won't lie, but it's the difference between it being an insufferable amount of sanding and a reasonable amount.
__________________
"The important thing is no one was hurt... No one who counts."
Altrus is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-12-2013, 03:12 PM   #7
nathancarter
See My Etchings.
 
nathancarter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 872
Quote:
Originally Posted by verdatum View Post
I used to sneer at paper mache, but these days, I'm a convert, it just needs to be done properly.
Quality post, as always.

I'm just about to start the surfacing on my Marceline's Axe Bass, going for a smooth high-gloss surface on the faces of the axe, and a worn-in metal look on the blades. This definitely gives me some specific direction on how to execute it.

Last edited by nathancarter : 02-12-2013 at 03:15 PM.
nathancarter is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-13-2013, 05:14 PM   #8
Tesh-chan
Finally changed my Avatar
 
Tesh-chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 147
Thanks very much for all the input.

Verdatum, is hot glue not recommended at all for this? I'm guessing that the paper mache is strong enough to hold the blocks together then.
__________________
~Attending Anime Boston 2013!~


Planned Cosplays:

Ramona Flowers - Scott Pilgrim (graphic novel version)
Tesh-chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-13-2013, 06:16 PM   #9
verdatum
Extremely registered user
 
verdatum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,305
As animenerd mentioned, I believe hot glue can melt styrofoam, though I haven't really tried. To fuse foam together, you can use white glue, though it can take awhile to dry, or 2-part epoxy, or gorilla glue, which must be used sparingly since it foams up. You can also paint the surfaces in cheap acrylic paint and then fuse them with spray-glue or contact cement.

The bond doesn't really have to be that strong, it just needs to hold together while you're carving it and applying the paper mache. After that, yes, the paper mache will hold everything together.
__________________
Founder Special FX wiki http://fx.wikia.com
verdatum is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-14-2013, 01:43 AM   #10
animenerd93
Neko Neko Chi CHi
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,789
i will confirm that hotglue melts styro.... used it and it melted a hole in the magnet headphones i was trying to build.....
__________________
Cosplays~~~~~~
AX Cosplays!!!!
Adelheid (KHR!)- 85% done
Fem!Austrian War Succesion France (Hetalia/Nyotalia)- 10% done
Fem!Izaya (Drrr!)- 90% done
Magent!Teto (Vocaloid)- 95% done
animenerd93 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:41 PM.


Copyright 2002-2013 Cosplay.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
All comments and posts in our forums are the opinion of the respective poster.