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Unread 04-13-2013, 10:13 PM   #1
A14jojo
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Hard time finding a suitable fabric for this Jacket

I have been looking around for a green fabric with darker green pinstripe that would make a nice jacket.

Reference to what I am planning to make:
http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m8...jnoo1_1280.png

After looking around at everything I am figuring that it’s very likely I might just have to engage in the tedious task of painting the stripes on by hand or maybe sewing them as a friend suggested.

So the question is what kind of fabric to use? I am still new to the whole picking fabrics thing so I am still learning.

I am open to anything that will make for a good looking jacket and will hopefully not wrinkle too badly, and if need be I am prepared to dye the fabric the color I need.
Suiting is out of the question since everything I have seen is 100% Polyester which is about near impossible to dye from what I read.

I bought samples from Joann's of several shades of a polycotton broadcloth that I thought might work. However, I have never used it myself and I have heard bad things about the fabric.

Here is the broadcloth:
http://www.joann.com/symphony-broadc...lids/prd10006/

What I noted about the fabric:
  • It felt like it had a nice weight to it.
  • It has a tight weave.
  • Because it’s a polycotten blend it’s more resistant to wrinkles.
  • Not expensive (this is not my main reason for choosing it. I actually put a lot of thought into the fabrics I will use and will pay more for something better so long as it’s within my budget)
  • It’s not see-through (lifted it to the light and couldn't see my hand through it). Also I will be lining the jacket.
  • I am thinking it won’t give me a hard time when painting on the stripes.

I also picked up a swatch of this, but this is 100% cotton. I like the color I have here, but I am weary of how cotton wrinkles.
http://www.joann.com/legacy-studio-solids/prd15787/

My friend also bought me some fabric which she thought to be rayon but turned out to be a polycotton. However, the weave looks different then what I have, reminds me of a twill. Again not sure about the fabric, especially since I don't have it in my hands yet to judge, so I don't know if it would make a good jacket or if it would be easy to paint the stripes on.

Here is a picture she took of it:
http://sta.sh/01svjzl7qo3v


I really don't know what fabric to use and I don't want to jump the gun on buying the fabric and make the jacket only to have something not worth the effort I put into it.

All input and advice is appreciated!

Last edited by A14jojo : 04-13-2013 at 10:18 PM.
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Unread 04-13-2013, 10:21 PM   #2
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Broadcloth is...well, it's not as weighty as you would normally make a coat like that out of. It will do, but it will definitely give you a different look from the poly/cotton bottomweight in the bottom photo. That's not a twill, it doesn't have the weave, but it is a bottomweight - looks like it has the solid weave of a trigger or similar bottomweight. It's a nice color, so at least you wouldn't have to dye it. Twills and bottomweights are more suitable for coats because they have the right drape and a good solid body to them. Broadcloth, while cheaper, is actually lighter-weight. It's not terrible, there are worse choices, but for the outer shell of a coat I will always pick twill or bottomweight over a quilter's cotton or broadcloth.

That said, nope, you're not going to find that pinstripe unless you're really lucky and some couture line for the spring decided they wanted lime green pinstripe. I doubt it. Painting on pinstripes is pretty tedious, but not difficult, and the end result is worth it. Don't sew it, sewing on ribbon is much harder to do. Keeping the ribbon or trim straight and evenly-spaced is an exercise in driving yourself insane. I've done it, and I will never do it again. It takes the same amount of time as painting and gives much less satisfying results IMO.

At least with paint, you can mask off the lines with tape - and I seriously recommend it. Taping the edges on both sides allows you to end up with clean, straight lines, and you can easily measure the tape to get even spacing between lines.
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Unread 04-13-2013, 11:00 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by CapsuleCorp View Post
Broadcloth is...well, it's not as weighty as you would normally make a coat like that out of. It will do, but it will definitely give you a different look from the poly/cotton bottomweight in the bottom photo. That's not a twill, it doesn't have the weave, but it is a bottomweight - looks like it has the solid weave of a trigger or similar bottomweight. It's a nice color, so at least you wouldn't have to dye it. Twills and bottomweights are more suitable for coats because they have the right drape and a good solid body to them. Broadcloth, while cheaper, is actually lighter-weight. It's not terrible, there are worse choices, but for the outer shell of a coat I will always pick twill or bottomweight over a quilter's cotton or broadcloth.

That said, nope, you're not going to find that pinstripe unless you're really lucky and some couture line for the spring decided they wanted lime green pinstripe. I doubt it. Painting on pinstripes is pretty tedious, but not difficult, and the end result is worth it. Don't sew it, sewing on ribbon is much harder to do. Keeping the ribbon or trim straight and evenly-spaced is an exercise in driving yourself insane. I've done it, and I will never do it again. It takes the same amount of time as painting and gives much less satisfying results IMO.

At least with paint, you can mask off the lines with tape - and I seriously recommend it. Taping the edges on both sides allows you to end up with clean, straight lines, and you can easily measure the tape to get even spacing between lines.

Thank you so so so much! It never would have occurred to me it was a bottomweight. You don't know how helpful your input is and how much I appreciate it!

I am so happy I can use the fabric my friend got and I will let her know to it send and to stop feeling bad that about not getting me rayon.

Is there any other fabric you might suggest for the jacket/coat?

Haha yeah, I realized quickly I was not going to find such a fabric, but hope is eternal and all that. And yeah, I am always going to use masking tape to make the lines, I just mentioned the sewing cause my friend suggested it and I thought I throw it out there. So thank you for the warning and saving me the heartache.

so I take it you have painted on pinstripes before? Might I ask how you did it? did you paint the pinstripes on after you sewed the jacket together or did you do that before you cut the fabric?
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Unread 04-14-2013, 05:37 AM   #4
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Ideally I'd want a suiting fabric if I was making this - since it is, after all, a suit - albeit a weird one. A cotton or otherwise bottomweight is your best bet on a budget. That cotton broadcloth is basically what you'd use for a really light summer blouse - and it will fold and wrinkle like one.

I would probably dye some white 100% wool suiting. But I feel like that's on the upper limit and would only bother if you planned on doing traditional tailoring. Although it depends on how you interpret the character - and you know more than I do. Is this supposed to be a quasi-dapper suit or is it something more rugged where they're just using traditional design elements but using rougher fabrics ?

It really depends on your budget and the time you want to put into it and what you expect to get out of it.
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Unread 04-14-2013, 12:24 PM   #5
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I agree that a white 100% wool with blue or black pinstripes would be your best bet. This time of year you can get good deals on it. 100% wool takes dye beautifully. The wool used for suiting is worsted so it isn't the itchy wool of blankets or sweaters. (This has to do with how the wool is spun and twisted into thread.)

If you do decide to use the broadcloth you may need an interlining of canvas. This will give your suit a little more oomph. It will look more structured and wrinkle less.

If I desperately wanted pinstripes I would sew them using the thread itself as the color, not a ribbon. I've done machine quilting so I know how tedious sewing lots of parallel lines can be but I think it would go quicker and have less mess potential than painting. I'd use a gauge to keep the stripes even. They sell one in quilting supplies or you can rig one up with an index card. Fill several bobbins with your color thread before you begin.
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Unread 04-14-2013, 01:37 PM   #6
A14jojo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelley View Post
Ideally I'd want a suiting fabric if I was making this - since it is, after all, a suit - albeit a weird one. A cotton or otherwise bottomweight is your best bet on a budget. That cotton broadcloth is basically what you'd use for a really light summer blouse - and it will fold and wrinkle like one.

I would probably dye some white 100% wool suiting. But I feel like that's on the upper limit and would only bother if you planned on doing traditional tailoring. Although it depends on how you interpret the character - and you know more than I do. Is this supposed to be a quasi-dapper suit or is it something more rugged where they're just using traditional design elements but using rougher fabrics ?

It really depends on your budget and the time you want to put into it and what you expect to get out of it.
Thank you for your input!

When I saw the artwork I imagined something a little more polished or as you said quasi-dapper, but I guess no any one interpretation is wrong. I did want the fabric to have a little structure to it so the tails in would not just hand limply but I guess some interfacing might fix that...? I probably could ask the artist for insight.

Anyway, I had intended to use suiting, it's just everything I found in Joanns, it's the only local fabric store, was 100% polyester so I couldn't dye it.

If nothing else I will use the bottomweight, I just don't want to have something that come off looking tacky.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MedievalGirl View Post
I agree that a white 100% wool with blue or black pinstripes would be your best bet. This time of year you can get good deals on it. 100% wool takes dye beautifully. The wool used for suiting is worsted so it isn't the itchy wool of blankets or sweaters. (This has to do with how the wool is spun and twisted into thread.)

If you do decide to use the broadcloth you may need an interlining of canvas. This will give your suit a little more oomph. It will look more structured and wrinkle less.

If I desperately wanted pinstripes I would sew them using the thread itself as the color, not a ribbon. I've done machine quilting so I know how tedious sewing lots of parallel lines can be but I think it would go quicker and have less mess potential than painting. I'd use a gauge to keep the stripes even. They sell one in quilting supplies or you can rig one up with an index card. Fill several bobbins with your color thread before you begin.
I will look around for wool suiting and see what I can find. Is there a site you might recommend?

As I said to Kelley, if nothing else I'll use the bottomweight in the 3rd picture. So my question is, this canvas you mentioned, is it something you think I should use with the bottomweight? Or is that just for the broadcloth in the first pictures? Could you show me an example please?

Yes! My friend had meant sew them in with thread, and it is an option I am considering though it's not something with my current skill level. ^^;
But yes, it will either be that or paint the pinstripes on myself.

----------------------------------------------------------------------


Do you both mean this sort of suiting? Didn't spot white so I picked colors I thought could be dyed easily to the color I need.
http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/p/...n-Wool-Suiting
http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/p/...Stripe-Suiting
http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/p/...w-Wool-Suiting


I also did find this before but dismissed it cause I was unsure of the fabric:
http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/p/...-Rayon-Suiting


Are there other colors I should be considering? I have never dyed anything that was not was white or a paler color of what I was trying to achieve. Like going from pink to red.

Seeing the prices I guess I my final question is, if nothing else, will the bottomwieght my friend got give me a nice looking jacket? Although, knowing myself I'll probably find a way to scrimp enough to buy the wool suiting....
I am estimating I would need about 4 yards? I also buy more then I need as a precaution.

Last edited by A14jojo : 04-14-2013 at 02:03 PM.
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Unread 04-14-2013, 07:39 PM   #7
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Honestly, when it comes to wool, even if it's specifically stated to be a worsted suiting, I would want to feel a swatch of it before buying to verify that it's even the right weight and hand. I love wool, and yes suitcoats are generally wool, but wool is not for everyone, particularly if you're going to have to dye it to get it where you want. The bottomweight is not a bad option. It will save you steps and it will still give you a sharp-looking suit. In the end, the difference between bottomweight and wool is going to be partly price, partly aesthetics, and partly effort. If you prefer to keep things less expensive and don't really relish the idea of attempting to dye wool a strong color (and if you want it really vibrant lime green, I have my doubts that you'll get there with a wool), then there is absolutely nothing wrong with the bottomweight. You won't even need an interlining (and not canvas, that can be a little TOO stiff) but a regular lining will do to keep the suit looking clean. Many suit patterns also suggest interfacing your pieces - you can use a fusible interfacing on a bottomweight and it will look and feel just as nice as a suiting wool.

Basically, you have options. And if you're going to have to paint or sew pinstripes, I would not blame you one bit if you wanted to cut down on the amount of prep work by going with a fabric already the color you want rather then messing with a different fabric which is equally good but not the right color. I've just spent two months wrestling with three different brands of dyes on two different fabrics, all natural, and would never judge anyone who decides they'd rather not mess with dye.

As for the pinstripes, when I pinstriped Sanji's shirt (because let's face it orange shirting with black stripes is not a common fabric) I actually washed the fabric and cut the pieces, but then painted before sewing - but that was because I wanted to be sure that the pinstripes were in the directions as indicated by the artwork. It showed the stripes going a certain way at each seam and on the collar and cuffs, some of which were against the typical grain, so the way to get them correct was to cut first, paint second. I'd say the other advantage of cut first/paint second is you don't have to waste time painting fabric that is essentially going to be cut off and discarded. You only paint that which is necessary to be painted.
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Unread 04-14-2013, 09:41 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by CapsuleCorp View Post
Honestly, when it comes to wool, even if it's specifically stated to be a worsted suiting, I would want to feel a swatch of it before buying to verify that it's even the right weight and hand. I love wool, and yes suitcoats are generally wool, but wool is not for everyone, particularly if you're going to have to dye it to get it where you want. The bottomweight is not a bad option. It will save you steps and it will still give you a sharp-looking suit. In the end, the difference between bottomweight and wool is going to be partly price, partly aesthetics, and partly effort. If you prefer to keep things less expensive and don't really relish the idea of attempting to dye wool a strong color (and if you want it really vibrant lime green, I have my doubts that you'll get there with a wool), then there is absolutely nothing wrong with the bottomweight. You won't even need an interlining (and not canvas, that can be a little TOO stiff) but a regular lining will do to keep the suit looking clean. Many suit patterns also suggest interfacing your pieces - you can use a fusible interfacing on a bottomweight and it will look and feel just as nice as a suiting wool.

Basically, you have options. And if you're going to have to paint or sew pinstripes, I would not blame you one bit if you wanted to cut down on the amount of prep work by going with a fabric already the color you want rather then messing with a different fabric which is equally good but not the right color. I've just spent two months wrestling with three different brands of dyes on two different fabrics, all natural, and would never judge anyone who decides they'd rather not mess with dye.

As for the pinstripes, when I pinstriped Sanji's shirt (because let's face it orange shirting with black stripes is not a common fabric) I actually washed the fabric and cut the pieces, but then painted before sewing - but that was because I wanted to be sure that the pinstripes were in the directions as indicated by the artwork. It showed the stripes going a certain way at each seam and on the collar and cuffs, some of which were against the typical grain, so the way to get them correct was to cut first, paint second. I'd say the other advantage of cut first/paint second is you don't have to waste time painting fabric that is essentially going to be cut off and discarded. You only paint that which is necessary to be painted.
First of all, thank you thank you THANK YOU. I appreciate all your input so much and your words quell all these nagging doubts I have about how to go about this jacket. You very likely saved me from a lot of heartache and nothing to show for it.

And secondly let me say wow, I went and took a look at the Sanji shirt you made and it looks so neat! I am very impressed and never would have thought you painted them on.

Also, like a dummy I never stopped to think that I should paint the cut pieces before sewing them. The few examples I have seen, which were Onceler coats, the people told me they painted the stripes on after the coat was put together.

When I get the bottomweight I will wash it and take a look at it, and I will also see about getting swatches of the wool suiting. Though after what you have shared I think the bottomweight will serve my purposes. As much as I am a stickler and willing to dye fabric to the color I need, the suiting would not be cheap and and dyeing can be messy and I might not end up with the color I want. If the bottomweight will look just as good and save me hassle then I am more than happy , and I fully intend to line it, and the interfacing is something I have never tried so that will be interesting. If my pattern does not call for it is there something like a tutorial I can read to figure out how to do it and do it right?


Next will be figuring out what pattern I need to buy that I can modify to my needs!
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Unread 04-15-2013, 02:22 AM   #9
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If I was going to dye a fabric, I would want a solid colour - not pre-striped or heathered - it's just adding a variable to make it harder. You can buy white wool on-line, but it's going to be more expensive than buying from a discount chain. I've dyed wool before and never had an issue - just don't use something like RIT dye, use something that is made for wool and silk protein fibres.

I guess I personally like thicker suitings and the common thin ones these days don't do it for me, I'm not a fan of how wrinkly all the "supers" get and how flimsy they tend to look. I'm surprised that the bright green fabric you already have access to could be considered a "bottomweight" since it looks really thin to me - but I guess it's relative and it could be the picture and how I'm seeing it.

I'm saying this as someone who comes from a tailoring background - so this is why interpretations vary, I'm not picking on CapsuleCorp or anything - we just have different expectations and that's okay (most people don't notice the fake chainmail in Monty Python and the Holy Grail and there was no good reason for them to make it real, a "fake" was a good solution for their purposes because it looked good, was cheap, and got the job done). When I make a suit I want to make it like a real suit - but I know that's not for everyone and it might not be right for YOU. I'm just laying it out so you have the option. I have used tailoring canvases in lightweight cotton suits and you just need to pick the right weight. I often like to use things like cotton duck or felt on the inside of suits for shaping - this is not an all-over lining, it's specifically placed to shape the lapels and upper chest and such. Fusible interfacing makes my skin crawl, I'll admit, but it's up to you and you can achieve good results to it but you need to have something to shape it over as you iron it on so that you get a good roll instead of a crease - this is something *simple* that you can do to improve the outcome of the garment without too much trouble. I might use broadcloth for a lining or sateen if I didn't want to track down something more specialised and presumably dye it.

This probably isn't right for you. You probably don't want to make this as if you were making a real suit because it's a lot of work, a lot of hours, and probably a lot of new techniques for you.

But I'm telling you because it's an option and knowing about it can help you make better choices no matter what you choose to do in the end. For instance, if I cannot afford the "perfect" fabric, knowing what it is and how it should look will help me pick out something that IS in my budget.

As for patterns, I draft my own from scratch and have done jackets before. If you don't want to do that, you can look through a pattern book and try to find something close - likely something that looks okay on top but just needs tails added.
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Unread 04-15-2013, 03:59 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelley View Post
If I was going to dye a fabric, I would want a solid colour - not pre-striped or heathered - it's just adding a variable to make it harder. You can buy white wool on-line, but it's going to be more expensive than buying from a discount chain. I've dyed wool before and never had an issue - just don't use something like RIT dye, use something that is made for wool and silk protein fibres.

I guess I personally like thicker suitings and the common thin ones these days don't do it for me, I'm not a fan of how wrinkly all the "supers" get and how flimsy they tend to look. I'm surprised that the bright green fabric you already have access to could be considered a "bottomweight" since it looks really thin to me - but I guess it's relative and it could be the picture and how I'm seeing it.

I'm saying this as someone who comes from a tailoring background - so this is why interpretations vary, I'm not picking on CapsuleCorp or anything - we just have different expectations and that's okay (most people don't notice the fake chainmail in Monty Python and the Holy Grail and there was no good reason for them to make it real, a "fake" was a good solution for their purposes because it looked good, was cheap, and got the job done). When I make a suit I want to make it like a real suit - but I know that's not for everyone and it might not be right for YOU. I'm just laying it out so you have the option. I have used tailoring canvases in lightweight cotton suits and you just need to pick the right weight. I often like to use things like cotton duck or felt on the inside of suits for shaping - this is not an all-over lining, it's specifically placed to shape the lapels and upper chest and such. Fusible interfacing makes my skin crawl, I'll admit, but it's up to you and you can achieve good results to it but you need to have something to shape it over as you iron it on so that you get a good roll instead of a crease - this is something *simple* that you can do to improve the outcome of the garment without too much trouble. I might use broadcloth for a lining or sateen if I didn't want to track down something more specialised and presumably dye it.

This probably isn't right for you. You probably don't want to make this as if you were making a real suit because it's a lot of work, a lot of hours, and probably a lot of new techniques for you.

But I'm telling you because it's an option and knowing about it can help you make better choices no matter what you choose to do in the end. For instance, if I cannot afford the "perfect" fabric, knowing what it is and how it should look will help me pick out something that IS in my budget.

As for patterns, I draft my own from scratch and have done jackets before. If you don't want to do that, you can look through a pattern book and try to find something close - likely something that looks okay on top but just needs tails added.
Oh of course! People do and see things differently, which make for some great variations on a cosplay you might have seen a hundred times. It keeps things interesting.

I hope you don't think I don't appreciate your input as well because I do! Very much so! Everything you have taken the time to write up I consider valuable information that even if I don't use now I will certainly use in the future. So again thank you for sharing.

I wish I could make something as intricate and lovely as you're describing and I hope that one day I might be able too! But now I think it's something beyond my abilities and I think CapsuleCorp perceives that and my situation and is offering advice with that mind. Right now all I hope is to make is a jacket that looks nice, not tacky, and will last me for quite some time, all within my capabilities. And you are right, knowing what it is and how it should look WILL help me make a better end product.

So I thank you both for giving me so much food for thought. I will definitely keep the fabrics you mentioned for shaping and lining in mind and will take careful consideration as to what to use for the jacket.

As for the pattern, yeah I think I am going to buy a pattern and modify it. Probably this one here http://www.simplicity.com/p-4465-mis...ckets.aspx#t-0

Last edited by A14jojo : 04-15-2013 at 04:05 AM.
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Unread 04-15-2013, 05:32 AM   #11
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It's okay, I wasn't thinking that ! - I just didn't want to come off as, "you must do it this way or you burn >:C"

That patterns looks like it will work well, too !
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Unread 04-15-2013, 06:10 PM   #12
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No worries. Kelley and I usually see eye to eye on a lot of things so there's no problem. I too generally go straight to wool when I'm making a suit for ME, but I've been doing 10x more customer projects than personal projects lately, so my eye has sort of drifted to where I try to keep all possibilities in mind.

I do love wool for suits. I freely admit it.
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