Go Back   Cosplay.com > Cosplay Construction > Sewing/Fabric Craft

Reply
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Unread 08-31-2013, 08:17 PM   #1
Mae Bliss
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 161
Angry Boning, my arch-nemesis

Ok, pretend I am a complete idiot who has no idea how to put boning in a strapless bodice (because that's what I am) and explain it to me.

I have this plastic boning, I assume the kind is "regular". It comes in a curve which I can straighten out if I need to, but for my waist the curve is actually ok. However, I don't know how to make an S-curve in it for the front pieces that go over the boobs. I suspect I need an entirely different kind of boning, is rigilene the thing to use?

Please help me, I am dumb.
Mae Bliss is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Unread 08-31-2013, 08:49 PM   #2
Fancy Feet
Registered User
 
Fancy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19
For bodices I use spiral steel boning. It's way more flexible and comfortable to wear than other kinds, and it curves better to the body. I've not had any luck finding any in my local fabric stores so I order online. To install sew some bone casing or twil tape into the bodice where you want to boning to be making a sort of tunnel, and you can slip the boning in and close off the ends. Make sure sure you also get some bone tips because the steel can poke through the fabric and then poke you! Hope this helps.
Fancy Feet is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-01-2013, 02:25 AM   #3
Evil Bishounen
Hail to the King
 
Evil Bishounen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,258
If this bodice is going against your body, do not use that cheap plastic boning. It will deform from the heat of your body and it will begin to warp in shape. It will form a point that starts digging into your side and I've even read horror stories about women being literally stabbed in the breast after they went clubbing in a cheap goth corset -and- expected that plastic boning to provide support.

A friend who makes tons of bodices and corsets says she uses spring steel or industrial zip ties for most bones, depending on whether she needs the garment to actually provide support or if it's just a fashion layer worn over a separate support garment. She uses spiral steel for bones that need to go over the breasts.
__________________
FF9 cosplay? Hit me up!

2014: Anime Los Angeles and whatever else falls into my lap

I now have a Tumblr. Sometimes I use it.
Evil Bishounen is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-01-2013, 08:38 AM   #4
Penlowe
Registered User
 
Penlowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,710
Even steel boning has some flex to it, it is sold coiled into a loop just like your plastic boning.

If you are using a commercial pattern for your strapless bodice, it will walk you through the steps of how to install the boning. I know some people poo-poh them, but I think commercial patterns are a great learning tool.
__________________
Nothing is impossible, but some things are very expensive.
My Etsy shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/penlowe
Penlowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-01-2013, 12:40 PM   #5
Kelley
Devil of Details
 
Kelley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,449
It's important to post reference pictures.

What should the costume look like when it's done ? Are you altering a commercial garment or making this from scratch ? What have you already made, if anything ?
__________________
Disclaimer : This post written by a Grumpy Old Man

Actually in the pipes:
- Remaking Ser Loras doublet.
- Luke Skywalker, A New Hope
- Wind Waker starter costume in swim material
Eventually: Paul from Dune, Faramir, Harry Sullivan
Kelley is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-01-2013, 06:22 PM   #6
Mae Bliss
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 161
Here is a reference picture of the character. I'm working on a muslin prototype of just the top part of the dress, it's a simple princess-seamed bodice the I've draped myself. (It looks like this, but the seams are more curved) I designed it to just sit over my bra/torso and not provide significant support/shaping on its own, although I would like the boning to keep it smooth and prevent the fabric from getting all slouchy. For the actual garment I have a bottom weight cotton sateen (this one from Joann) and medium-heavy fusible interfacing. Will this be strong enough to hold spiral steel boning? Should I try to make it as more of a serious corset? Can spiral steel boning be bent into a specific shape, or is it held in shape by the structure of the garment?

Thank you all for any advice, hopefully this is enough follow-up information, if not let me know
Mae Bliss is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-02-2013, 12:54 AM   #7
crosschord
aka Identivity
 
crosschord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 368
Please please please, get some duck canvas or a heavy duty fabric from Joanns and flatline your outer layer (the cotton sateen). Cut the corset pieces out of both fabrics and sew the two together and treat it as one piece of fabric. It'll make your fabric secure and will work a LOT better than using interfacing.

As for boning, it's basically held in shape by the construction of the garment and will form against your body once you put the corset on.
__________________
Identivity Cosplay on Facebook! My Twitter

I also make plushes and fandom pillows!
Visit Sew Delightful on Storenvy! Visit Sew Delightful on Etsy!


Upcoming Conventions!
Comikaze - November 2014 (Will be there for one day)
Anime Los Angeles - January 2015
Fanime - May 2015

Costumes in Progress!
CC - Code Geass
Asami - Legend of Korra
crosschord is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-02-2013, 01:10 AM   #8
why_00
Emileigh
 
why_00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 331
In my experiences with boning, you shouldn't have to form it into a curve. As long as you can get it flat it will be fine. Also if you're using the plastic boning, you can use an iron to flatten it. However I would recommend you pull the plastic boning out of the case if it is in one and rounding the tip on each side by cutting it and then filing it down so that it's smooth and doesn't have any sharp edges. This will extend the life of the garment by it not being able to poke through as easily and it won't be able to harm you as easily either.
__________________
Find me at:
Deviant art
Facebook
Tumblr

Upcoming cosplays:
- Kyoko Sakura - Puella Magi Madoka Magica - Finished!
- Raven - Teen Titans - Finished!
- Dragon Kid - Tiger & Bunny - In progress - to be finished sometime next year
- Crysta - Ferngully - To be decided
why_00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-02-2013, 01:18 AM   #9
Evil Bishounen
Hail to the King
 
Evil Bishounen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mae Bliss View Post
For the actual garment I have a bottom weight cotton sateen (this one from Joann) and medium-heavy fusible interfacing. Will this be strong enough to hold spiral steel boning?
Cotton sateen is much too thin for even plastic boning. You need a heavier fabric.

I used plastic boning in the boot fins for my Kuja costume and learned firsthand that lightweight fabrics are a bad idea. The outer fabric was a thick pleather, but the backing was some kind of Kona cotton, which is about the same thickness as the Joann stretch sateen. After a few wearings, the plastic boning completely wore through the cotton backing in multiple places and several of the bones poked clean through it. (It never stabbed me in the foot though; I built the boots over leather shoes and there was a thick tongue in the way that protected my foot.)

For the record, this happened despite my extra efforts to round and smooth out any sharp edges.
__________________
FF9 cosplay? Hit me up!

2014: Anime Los Angeles and whatever else falls into my lap

I now have a Tumblr. Sometimes I use it.
Evil Bishounen is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-02-2013, 04:26 AM   #10
Mae Bliss
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 161
Would I be able to use the sateen I have if I make a casing for the boning out of a stronger material? Or would flatlining it also accomplish this? I'd like to avoid having to buy all new fabric if I can

Thanks for all the help everyone Clearly I had even less of a clue about what I was doing than I thought before
Mae Bliss is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-02-2013, 07:59 AM   #11
Penlowe
Registered User
 
Penlowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,710
Yes you can still use your sateen BUT you need to back it with something much tougher than standard inner facing, something at least blue jeans weight.
__________________
Nothing is impossible, but some things are very expensive.
My Etsy shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/penlowe
Penlowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-02-2013, 10:59 AM   #12
Kelley
Devil of Details
 
Kelley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,449
You want to use the sateen as a "fashion fabric" only (it also stretches, which is reeeeaaally bad if you try to put boning in it). You'll have the layers of heavy cotton twill (I think it's easier to do a double layer rather than do bone casings individually, but it's up to you - double layer is much less work).

Now, based on the reference picture it doesn't look like you need a full-on corset. But do you want to make one ? Are you using it as a foundation layer or an outer layer ?

I made a friend a bustier whose pattern looked like the one you've made - and I'm pretty sure we only put boning in the sides, back, and front - not over the bust. You're right, the boning is not going to curve back up and over the bust. If you need support, you can put boning up to perhaps halfway up the crest of the bust and have a cup structure under it so it stays in place and doesn't poke you.

Overbust corsets can have boning going over the bust, but it's a very different shape from the reference picture and your pattern. There can be a small amount of curving back over the bust, but it's not as much as I think you want - and it's done a bit differently and would require a bit different construction.

I would highly recommend cable ties at least over that plastic "regular" boning - it's not very good and like others have said, it will deform just from the heat of your body. You can get steel pretty cheaply too. It just depends on what you want to accomplish with this.

It might help if you either sketched the aesthetic you want to accomplish or maybe found some pictures that look like how you picture this being made in real life.
__________________
Disclaimer : This post written by a Grumpy Old Man

Actually in the pipes:
- Remaking Ser Loras doublet.
- Luke Skywalker, A New Hope
- Wind Waker starter costume in swim material
Eventually: Paul from Dune, Faramir, Harry Sullivan
Kelley is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 09-05-2013, 09:22 PM   #13
Mae Bliss
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 161
Is the canvas/twill they'd have at joann's good enough quality? (there's a coupon commotion coming up!) If not, is there a brand available online that is good?

I can't really find any pictures of what I want, specifically. I don't want it to look as stiff as a corset, but I was unhappy with how the front was wrinkling without any boning. However, I realize now that the belt/harness I'll be wearing covers the wrinkliest area, and I can probably use cups to hold the shape of the bust, if the heavier fabric alone isn't enough.

Thank you all! I'm glad I found out I need to underline this before I wasted any of my actual fabric
Mae Bliss is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:58 AM.


Copyright 2002-2013 Cosplay.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
All comments and posts in our forums are the opinion of the respective poster.