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Unread 10-16-2013, 07:32 AM   #16
Penlowe
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Construct the gold edges independently but about twice as wide as the finished edge will appear. Then sew in place layering the raw edge under your pretty finished blue edge, lining it up so only the right amount shows. Trim the excess on the inside as close as you dare, then satin stitch over the seam to make it look like the rest of the garment.
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Unread 10-17-2013, 04:08 PM   #17
dizzymonochrome
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Random tip if you're going to take the front piece apart: A straight stitch can also be torn out by hand to avoid accidentally picking or damaging the satin. I find it easier and quicker as well. Using the seam ripper, carefully pick out a few stitches until you have enough thread to hold in your fingers. Then quickly pull downward in the direction the thread comes from until it snaps. It's best to see a bit of fabric gathering before you tear the piece of thread off. Go to the other side of the seam and you should have a tail of thread, once again enough to get a grip on, repeat the process. It's faster than trying to pick out every stitch one by one, and negates the need for a seam ripper that could damage the fabric with it's pointy end.

This only works for straight stitch, though. You wouldn't be able to remove the satin stitching the same way.
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Unread 10-17-2013, 04:44 PM   #18
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Thank you Pen, I'm going to try that out.

@Dizzy, I've been kinda nervous to pull out tread from the satin. The fraying of the gold is horrendous. The base fabric is actually crepe and it seems to make big hole gaps. The shiny dark blue you see is a satin with a crepe back so it's much more sturdier and would try that out on. Believe or not, I find the satin stitch very easy to take out with the ripper, small scissors and tweezers.
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Unread 10-17-2013, 07:05 PM   #19
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You could probably "heal" the holes by ironing before trying to sew again. The machine needle doesn't actually make holes, it pushes between the threads of the fabric. Breaking the stitching thread rather than picking would preserve your fabric better.

You could try some seam sealer for the fraying.
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Unread 10-20-2013, 08:22 AM   #20
RaeyofLight
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzymonochrome View Post
You could probably "heal" the holes by ironing before trying to sew again. The machine needle doesn't actually make holes, it pushes between the threads of the fabric. Breaking the stitching thread rather than picking would preserve your fabric better.

You could try some seam sealer for the fraying.
I probably have to. I just bought a satin stitch foot for my machine. I asked for a button one and a roller, (which seems both sewing dealers in my area doesn't have a roller) and they told me the satin stitch with a darning plate would work just fine.

I also tried something with the fosshape where I took the light blue satin w/ a crepe back and the satin gold on top and fused them with wonder under then took those pieces and ironed the back of the fosshape to fuse to the back of the light blue. It came out pretty good but what I was originally going to do was zig zag the edge of it to attach to the base dark blue crepe, similar to how to finish the edge of a seam. The store I went to said I couldn't do that with this because the the fosshape 300 was too thick to attempt it with a satin stitch and that even a straight stitch with a walking foot wouldn't help either.

My girlfriend suggested tapering the edge of the fosshape to lower it which both workers seemed to ignore, only to ask us if we had one of those high powered sergers... like twice. I remember hearing someone mention on how to deal with dramatically different fabric weights... The worker suggested something about tissue under the fabrics when sewed but I think that just had something to do with the satin stitching. Her other big solution was to use a decorative stitch rather than just a satin to help with the terrible fraying that the gold satin has been doing. (which is why I'll probably use that seam sealer) They also suggested just gluing the piece to the fabric, rather than trying to stitch it but I'm not sure if I'm comfortable with that either... Is there a way I can help give my foot support? should I perhaps place pieces of the fosshape next to the piece with a small gap for the needle? what do you think of my gf's idea?

I was probably going to do this around the whole perimeter of the 4 panels too. We decided just trying to make the fabric pieces wrap around the fosshape on those because the shapes were just too strange that a sleeve would be rather difficult to slide the fosshape into. So what I was thinking of doing was fusing the light blue onto the front gold, wrapping the edges around the fosshape, fold the edges of the back piece to the fosshape then satin stitch the whole perimeter to bring them together.

btw, Penlowe. Your suggestion worked out great. They look really good.
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Unread 10-20-2013, 10:53 AM   #21
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I'm not terribly familiar with foshape, is it a plastic? If so the reason you can't satin stitch it is because it has no fiber grain to it, stitching is punching holes, satin stitch is punching holes really close together. Satin stitch doesn't work on leather for the same reason, it winds up perforating the material to the point of just falling apart.

I got kinda lost on the explanation of where you wanted to use this foshape stuff (please forgive me I have a horrid cold and I'm all drugged up). There are super stiff inner facing materials that you can sew through, these might be worth searching out for that parts that need to be sewn. I would be very hesitant to use and kind of glue with a satin fabric, it's a weave that really soaks up and shows moisture permanently. Definitely test on scraps first!

I have use cardboard inside fabric pockets to make rigid shapes. [kids dinosaur costume, used cardboard in the triangles down the back]. I actually used a zipper foot to sew it into the tightest fit possible. I put my fabric right sides together just like normal, then I put my cardboard inside. The zipper foot allowed me to sew right on the edge of my stiff cardboard without risk of breaking a needle. After I clipped the curves and turned it right side out, I put the cardboard back in and used the zipper foot again to close it up with a very tight fir. Granted, my closing seam wasn't pretty, but it didn't have to be as it was getting attached to other things.
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Unread 10-20-2013, 12:05 PM   #22
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Fossshape is a special type of fabric used for crafts that can actually be sewn.

http://www.wonderflexworld.com/fossh...ked-questions/
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Unread 10-20-2013, 10:48 PM   #23
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Ok. let me get this straight. As normal, you had the fabric right sides together with the stiff object flipped and sewn with a zipper foot against the edge. Turned the fabric inside out and placed the object back in the right way. Then closed the sleeve.

Yes, I thought of something similar to this.


This one I can probably certainly make a sleeve with.


This one however has these little arms poking out and so I wasn't sure if I can make a sleeve with this one.

Fosshape feels like felt and when it gets stiff, it's still sew-able provided you didn't scorch the crap out of it.

And I feel ya.. people getting sick round here and I'm not too hot myself, especially with the energy drinks/5 hours I've been drinking lately.
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Unread 10-21-2013, 07:57 AM   #24
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In order to make my stiffened shapes I fully lined them. I still think you can do this. As to the second one, it doesn't matter which end you leave open, I'd sew around the narrow side and hand sew the wide end (for a pretty closure) after inserting the stiff piece.
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