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Unread 05-07-2017, 03:12 PM   #1
Nirv
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Simple Science - How To Lose Weight/Fat

“I want to lose weight/Drop a couple of pounds.” is without a doubt one of the most common goals in relation to fitness and it is both hard and easy to accomplish. Its easy in the sense that once you understand the basic science of how weight loss works (in a safe manner), you can begin putting in the work as soon as you finish reading this article knowing that science is on your side. Yet its also hard for a number of reasons other than the physical work and psychological effort you would put yourself through to shed that excess fat.

Some of these reasons include the muddled confusion that stems from the fitness industry and community itself, everything from dishonest or plain wrong advice in order to sell supplements/magazines/DVD's, right down to the broscience and totally biased peer studies. With various forums, gym folk, TV guru's, supplement salesmen, magazines and other conmen giving conflicting information and bro science, is it any wonder that weight loss seems like such a daunting task? That is why I have decided to type up this article, to give people a simple explanation to the science of how weight loss works and how to go about it effectively yet more important, safely. I have to be brutally honest here by saying some of the threads & posts in this section of the forum are horrendously misleading, myth or simply wrong.

However before we delve into the “how to” section, lets take a quick biology lesson. The more you understand the science behind this topic, the more effective you can put it into practice.

So the simple science of losing weight occurs when:

Your body burns more calories than you consume.

Calories in < Calories out.

It really is that simple. No matter how many fat burners you take, clean/healthy foods you eat or detox tea's you knock back, if you are consuming more calories than what you burn daily then you will gain weight. This is the exact same situation for exercising. You can finish a hard days work on a farm then go out for a 6 mile run in the evening, but once again if you are consuming more calories than you burn then once again, you will gain weight. You cannot out exercise a bad diet, fact.

So what is a calorie?

A calorie is a unit of energy.

Calories are the fuel that our bodies run on. The human body is literally a machine, hence the term Bio-mechanics (cool right?) and almost like a car that demands more fuel depending on the speed it goes at, our body uses up different amounts of fuel/calories depending on the activities we put ourselves through. Calories are obtained by eating various food sources, whether its meat, fruit or even pop tarts. However because there are different food sources, not all calories are made the same. This is where Macro nutrients come in to play.

Macronutrients?

Macronutrients are the three main sources that come from calories, providing our bodies with energy whilst also giving host to a range of other functions. Macronutrients, or Macro's as they are most referred as are:

Carbohydrates – An energy source that is stored in our muscles and liver cells in the form of glycogen. Carbs should provide the majority of our bodies energy. Carbs can be found in foods such as potato's, other veggies , fruits, bread etc. 1 Gram of Carbs is worth 4 calories.

Fat – Fat is stored beneath the skin (adipose tissue) where it serves not only as a reserve fuel source, but also insulation to prevent heat loss. 1 Gram of fat is worth 9 calories (Hence the stubbornness to burn it off.).

Protein – Protein is the building material used for the growth and repair of tissues in the body, which is why bodybuilders and other gym goers tend to have high protein diets. Its stored differently to fats and carbs, therefore if more protein is consumed than needed, it will be converted and stored as fat. 1 Gram of protein is worth 4 calories.

There are also Micronutrients (Vitamins, Iron, Calcium etc) however its Macronutrients that focuses on your body composition.

What is Body Composition?

“In physical fitness,*body composition*is used to describe the percentages of fat, bone, water and muscle in human bodies. Because muscular tissue takes up less space in our*body*than fat tissue, our*body composition, as well as our weight, determines leanness.” - Quoted from wikipedia. Lazy right? Maybe I am, but its a solid description and its in your favour to understand the important of body composition. Lots of factors decide body composition such as genetics and gender, but for now lets stick to nutrition. This is where “A calorie is not just a calorie.” comes into play.

Lets say you've done the math and you've decided to lose weight by eating 2000 calories a day. For some reason you decide to eat 2000 calories worth of just Carbs and fat without caring about protein. So what happens is you still lose weight, but you also drop a dramatic amount of muscle because you failed to ingest the correct protein requirements in order to repair/build your muscle tissue, or at least preserve it. Different body goals require different macro nutrient intakes, and everyone reacts different to various balances. For basic healthy weight loss I would suggest your diet consists of 40% Carbs, 35% Protein and 25% fat (You might want to google a Macro Calculator for specific grams). Various calculators will tell you different percentages and that's fine, however this is my personal weight loss calculation.

So now we get to the juicy party of finding out how many calories we should be taking on board, taking into account our activity levels whilst we are at it. First we calculate our BMR (Basal Metabolic Weight).

What is BMR?

Basal Metabolic Rate is how many calories we burn simply by being alive. That's right, our bodies burn up calories simply by breathing, pumping blood around the body and having a functioning brain. In fact, a big chunk of your daily calories are burned up during your sleep, cool right? For example, In a 6 hour sleeping period (I get no where near enough sleep) I burn roughly around 600 calories. So what' the mathematical formula for figuring out our BMR? Lets use my personal favourite formula, the Harris-Benedict equation. I'm a limey by the way, so I'm afraid its going to be in kilograms, however a quick google will find you an imperial system.

BMR calculation for men (metric) - BMR = 66.5 + ( 13.75 x weight in kg ) + ( 5.003 x height in cm ) – ( 6.755 x age in years )

BMR calculation for women (metric) - BMR = 655.1 + ( 9.563 x weight in kg ) + ( 1.850 x height in cm ) – ( 4.676 x age in years )


For example, I'm a 29 year old 70kg Male and I'm 173cm tall. Using that information, my BMR is roughly 1,698. Try the formula using my details, if you get 1,698 then you've got the formula right and can input your own details.

So we've now got our BMR Calories. But what about if we aren't in a coma or sleeping all day. We work, we walk to places, we pick things up etc that causes us to burn more calories. So how do we add that to the equation? Well this is called your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure) and it goes hand in hand with your BMR.

So how do I calculate my TDEE?

You take your BMR and multiply it by the following...

1.1 = sedentary (little or no exercise)

1.2 = light activity (light exercise/sports 1 to 3 days per week)

1.35 = moderate activity (moderate exercise/sports 3 to 5 days per week)

1.45 = very active (hard exercise/sports 6 to 7 days per week)

1.6 to 1.8 = extra active (very hard exercise/sports 6 to 7 days per week and physical job)


So lets take my BMR and multiply it by my activity level to get my TDEE. My BMR is 1,698 and I am going to multiply it be 1.6 (I'm extra active) to get my total daily energy expenditure. My result is 2,716.

Simple science? In order for me to maintain weight, I need to consume 2,716 calories a day. But what about losing weight? In order for us to burn fat we need to enter a calorie deficit so that once our body uses up the available micronutrients for the day, we start burning into our fat reserves.

How to adjust calories using your TDEE.

In order to lose 1lb of fat a week then you need to cut your calories by 500 a day. In total this brings you into a calorie deficit of 3500 a week. That's right, science can fairly estimate how much weight you can lose and when. With enough knowledge, discipline and motivation to put in the work, you can plan precisely how much weight you want to lose by the calendar. This is however a very basic system for losing weight.

Depending how much weight you want to lose, or just how overweight you may be, it might be more beneficial to take away 20% of your TDEE (I recommend this system for over those who are overweight) instead of using a blanket 500 cal deficit. There are various deficits you can enter in order to drop certain a certain amount of weight in a certain amount of time (Google is your friend!), however some of these may be quite unhealthy.

So just to clarify, my maintenance weight is 2,716. If I want to lose 1lb a week I would cut my calories by 500 putting me into a calorie range of 2,216 a day. If I wanted to gain weight I would do the opposite by adding an extra 500 calories in my diet to make me gain 1lb a week.

Last edited by Nirv : 05-07-2017 at 04:25 PM. Reason: Adding more info
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Unread 05-07-2017, 03:13 PM   #2
Nirv
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So that is it ladies and gents, the Simple Science of losing weight/burning fat. If there are ANY questions at all please leave a reply or send me a private message if you wish to have some confidential privacy. If there is anything you believe I could make more simpler/clearer or add to the thread then don't hesitate to let me know. The more feedback I get, the more inspired I'll be to do other articles or to improve my explanations.h Depending on well this article goes down, I will happily do more in the future.

My Credentials – I am a qualified Fitness Instructor in the UK, where I studied not only physical exercise and the principles of fitness but also biology and anatomy at college (Top of my class). I am currently in training to get my diploma as a Personal Trainer and later in the year I also hope to gain access to a Sports Nutrition Diploma. I have an instagram account called pintsandpushups where I post various fitness and food related stuff, including food hacks and specific work outs aswell as calorie tips. I hope this guide has helped you and it would honestly make my day to know that people are getting genuine use out of it.

Last edited by Nirv : 05-07-2017 at 03:54 PM. Reason: Underlining!
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Unread 05-07-2017, 10:48 PM   #3
EXEC_HYMME_MACARON
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Great information, however the activity levels confuse me a bit.

For instance, I don't do any sports or exercise classes, however I walk every single day usually 3+ miles. This includes several sets of stairs.

I've been told that walking is light activity by other people.. but since I'm doing it every day do I count it as moderate?
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Unread 05-08-2017, 12:35 AM   #4
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Nirv, where you list womens BMR formula, is 655.1 a typo? should it be 65.51?

EXEC, id measure exercise by heart rate, or generaly if you "feel it"
if your walks and stairs are a breeze, then its less exercise than if you get a little winded or feel like you actualy worked
the body tries to optimize effort, or as we say "we get used to it" and when you hit that point it takes less energy (calories burned)
to do that activity,
so if you do this a few times a day, no prob, its sedentary or light (dependeng on other instances of exercise)
if you feel it, light to moderate

Nirv, i know you dont claim to be a dietrition, but, does eating throught the day really do any differant than 1 meal per day?
(normal hours for me is 11am-3am) so i just eat dinner and call it good, if i do eat another meal i still eat the same size dinner

Last edited by Dictamnus Albus : 05-08-2017 at 01:24 AM.
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Unread 05-08-2017, 04:58 AM   #5
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@EXEC_HYMME_MACARON - I'm glad you've brought this up and it is something I am going to come back and edit later on in regards to walking/steps/activity levels. Taking steps/walking in my opinion is one of the BEST activities for your health and its actually my main focus of the day way before working out in the gym. If you know roughly how far in miles you walk a day that's a great start. I am going to copy and paste a basic translation of how active your steps are.

Sedentary Lifestyle Index: Under 5000 steps per day is an indicator of being inactive and sitting too much, which raises health risks.

Low Active: 5,000 to 7,499 steps per day is typical of daily activity excluding sports and exercise and might be considered low active. The average American walks 5,900 to 6,900 steps per day, putting the majority in the low active category.

Somewhat Active: 7,500 to 9,999 steps per day likely includes some exercise or walking (and/or a job that requires more walking) and might be considered somewhat active.

Active: 10,000 steps per day indicates the point that should be used to classify individuals as active. This makes it a good daily goal for healthy people who want a quick indicator they are getting in their daily exercise.

Highly Active: Individuals who take more than 12,500 steps/day are likely to be classified as highly active.


You should be able to translate this to the Activity formula to get a rough estimate of your TDEE. Just so you know, a mile is just a little over 2000 steps. Step counters/pedometers/fitbits are fantastic for tracking your general activity, but using websites such as mapometer can plan certain routines that tell you how far you have walked. Take in to account that if you were to elevate your heart rate by saying power walking or running to get those steps in, then you'll burn more calories than just by simply walking. I hope this helps, Please feel free to ask any other questions or give feedback. I'll come back and edit some of this information into the original post!

@Dictamnus Albus - No typo I'm afraid, women tend to need less calories than men (Depending on weight/height and TDEE of course). In regards to heart rate that's a whole different ball game and something I would need to do another thread on as there are various mathematical calculations to finding out your heart rate zones for resting, aerobic, fat burning and performance improvements. This is actually one of my favourite subjects and something I like to think I specialise in! The easiest thing to track this however would be a heart rate monitor/watch.

I'm not a nutritionist (I hope to get qualified for this at a later date) however I am qualified to give the basics and its something I study a lot of so I'm glad you've asked me this because one of my biggest pet peeves is people claiming you should eat a certain amount of meals a day. There is actually a sticky in this forum where someone claims you should be eating 6 meals a day because it boosts your metabolism which enrages me. Pure outdated broscience with a Lack of scientific evidence. The simple answer is this:

You do whats best for you.

If you're eating around 2,500 calories a day it doesn't matter if you split it into 2, 3, 4, 5 or 12 meals. As long as you are taking in your Maintenance/Weight Loss/Weight gain calories then that's the result you will get. It doesn't matter what time of the day you eat them either. Another bro-science myth that sends me into a fury is you should not eat before bed, especially carbs. In fact, you could eat all your calories in just one meal a day which is called Intermittent fasting. Without over complicating things and going off topic, this is something I practice. Depending on my TDEE I eat anywhere between 2000/3500 calories a day and I actually split it into two meals. For various reasons I only eat between 1pm - 8pm (Yep, I skip breakfast.) but honestly? It doesn't matter what time you eat.

It can be a bit tricky splitting the cals over a two day period (for example you said your feeding window tends to be between 11am-3am) so monitoring calorie intake might be a bit awkward. In this case I would pay close attention to the weekly deficit/maintenance/bulk numbers rather than just tracking 24hours. Make sense?

I hope this helps. If at any point It sounds like I'm speaking in riddles let me know and I'll try and simplify it and provide examples.

Last edited by Nirv : 05-08-2017 at 05:05 AM. Reason: punctuation
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Unread 05-08-2017, 10:03 AM   #6
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Thanks for the information about walking and active lifestyle. I'm injured right now and my doctor says that I can only do light activity like walking. Good to know roughly how much I should be walking.
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Unread 05-08-2017, 11:03 AM   #7
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@gypsy_girl - You are very much welcome! Take it easy with your recovery and don't rush your rehabilitation. Walking will keep you fit, healthy and active if you do enough of it. I Hope you have a speedy recovery!
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Unread 05-21-2017, 06:48 AM   #8
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Thanks for the information
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Unread 05-31-2017, 12:17 PM   #9
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Weight loss is 80% diet and 20% activity.

Eat a good diet and move around a bit more and for most people it will help. But if you are looking at serious weight loss, a calorie restrictive diet might actually cause more harm than good. Been there, done that. Our diet is full of carbs and that's probably the worst thing to eat for weight loss. Here's why... in my lengthy post.

Keep in mind that human beings did not consume grains only until around 12,000 years ago. Before that, humans lived in hunter-gatherer tribes where we ate primarily meats and whatever else the land around us provided. Our diets were pretty high in protein and fat, but early humans might've had to go a long time without any meals if there were droughts, herd shortages, or no good results from hunts. 12,000 years in the scale of human evolution is maybe an hour, and the guidelines in the 1970's pushing for the baseline of our diets being carbohydrates probably 1 minute. And since that study (which was severely flawed, btw.) obesity shot up as soon as "low fat" began being marketed as a way to promote heart health.

While you can consume too many calories, what you are eating has a greater impact on your health and fat storage/loss rather than calories. Bodies differ, hormone levels which control fat storage and loss differ from person to person. Keep this in mind.

Carbs: Starchy carbs coming from breads, pastas, grains, potatoes, etc are converted into glucose. Your liver can only hold about 70g of glucose and a little more elsewhere. If there is too much glucose in your system, your body will store it as fat. So be careful with it.

Not to mention that glucose as well as sugars (fructose) spike insulin causing blood sugar crashes. Ever get a weak feeling after not eating for awhile, like you really need to eat? This is caused from that. Do this too much and you become insulin resistant, and fat quickly builds up.

You can end up with fatty liver disease not just from drinking, but also from consuming too much fructose.

Carbs coming from green leafy veggies are full of fiber as well as other important nutrients your body needs. You can eat tons of them and honestly that's the best source for carbs.

Fats:Eating fat does not make you fat. It has more calories, yes. However, good healthy natural unprocessed fats coming from sources such as meat, nuts, eggs, avacado, cheese, butter as well as oils like EVO, Coconut, etc make you feel fuller for much longer, barely creates any insulin response. Plus it gives food flavor. Eating a diet high in natural fats will help your body BURN fat, so long as your body is not relying on glucose for it's energy source. This is what early humans relied on for sustenance and to get them through until the next meal, whenever that may be. (Not whenever you hit the nearest restaurant or raid the fridge)

When you reduce your carbohydrates down really low, usually under 50g, your body will go into Ketosis. Your liver will start breaking down fat and producing ketone bodies. Your brain and body will begin using that for energy. It takes awhile to become adapted, but it does wonders for the brain and provides a huge amount of energy. Body builders will often use ketosis to help get down to a low body fat percentage for competitions. But it's great for anyone who isn't diabetic.

FYI: Your arteries aren't clogged by eating too much cholesterol. Your body produces about 2000mg of cholesterol a day. If you are are consuming more in your diet, your body will produce less. When it comes to arteries and heart issues, glucose causes inflamation in the artery walls. Your body will send Cholesterol there to repair it and it will build up. If everyone was eating low fat, we wouldn't have as many issues with obesity and heart disease as we do. But here we are, 2017 and it's only gotten worse (to the day) that carbs were made out to be the baseline of our diets. Carb and sugar laden cereals labeled as "fat free!" and "heart healthy!", a bag of gummy bears "fat free food!!!" So that means it's healthy right? u_u;;

Protein: Protein is good, but unless you are doing some serious training, excess protein consumed will be converted into glucose. This is also one reason why if you go on a low calorie restrictive diet, you might experience muscle loss. If your body is running strictly on glucose, it will start turning to your muscle tissue for that energy. However, when you are fueled by fat, your body goes after the fat in your diet followed by the fat on your body once what bit of glycogen your liver may have stored from the veggies you've eaten.

Sleep: Benefits from working out occur when you are asleep. If you are not getting at least 8 hours of sleep and getting some good REM time, all that working out will go to waste. Your body produces a growth hormone and the greatest fat loss happens while sleeping when your body is repairing itself. Work out and get some good rest.

Intermittent fasting is something I swear by too, where you only eat within a certian window of time. I usually do 2 good nutrient dense meals within a 6-8 time period, no snacking between and eaten earlier in the day, like lunch and then an earlier dinner if I can. Your body won't burn fat if insulin is present.

Keep in mind that a low calorie diet WILL mess up your metabolism. Your body has a natural reset point after weight loss, and it's easy to go back to it even if you are generally being mindful about your consumption. It would've required me eating 1200 calories most days just to maintain my weight with how bad a low calorie diet wrecked my system. I went from 215 in 2004, lost a bit due to more activity but hovered around 175-195 from then on. Then in 2012 I went from 175 to 145 by 2014 with ups and downs here and there. Lots of yo-yoing a lot of eating 1200 calories (and a lot of it was bread and pasta in small portions). I gained it all back and as of April 30th, I was at 192lbs AGAIN.

I've been on a ketogenic diet for a month now, dropped 12lbs in a month and roughly 3" off my waist. I have amazing energy and feel great, positive, happy and I have no blood sugar issues like I did before. Name any issue and this diet has probably helped me. I don't really count calories. But I pay more attention to making sure I hit my macros: 5-10% carbs, 25-30% protein and 70-75% fat. I eat a lot more fresh food now and have been off starchy carbs and sugar.
- No pollen allergies (reduces inflamation)
- Bags under my eyes went away (reduces inflamation)
- Skin looks way better.
- No acne. I barely got a pimple and last month around shark week I broke out everywhere before the diet change. (again inflammation)
- Joint pain reduced.
- Sleeping better
- Teeth feel amazing and freshly brushed throughout the day.
- Abundance of energy. Not hungry. And when I am hungry it's just a light stomach grumble. I fasted for a bit over a day and had no problems going without food, dropped 5lbs and almost 1/2 cm off my measurements.

I'd highly recommend eating this way to anyone looking to lose some weight and lose it quickly. But it's also a lifestyle change. I don't think I will be going back to eating like how I did, and if I did, it might be for special occasions. I plan on introducing fruit, rice, and sweet potatoes once I get to my goals. But right now, they are not in my diet due to sugars and staying in a constant state of ketosis.

TLR: Carbs coming from grains and sugars are horrible for your health. Sugar is probably just as bad for you as heavy drinking (it's also more addictive than cocaine). Our bodies evolved to derive energy from fat not from grain. Low Carb High Fat diet (aka going into Ketosis) is amazing for weight loss and overall health. Try it if you are able.
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Last edited by Bobbi : 05-31-2017 at 12:23 PM.
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Unread 06-08-2017, 11:57 AM   #10
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Oh dear.

I've got some bad news for you Bobbi. Your understanding of science backed nutrition and biology is quite simply wrong. I will dissect your reply momentarily and explain why you are wrong and hopefully educate you on the subject, however for now its important that I say this.

I have no issues with a Ketogenic diet. It has its benefits, however it also has its side effects which I will go into last, because its more important at the moment for me to correct you on key matters. I'm not going to do this chronologically, I will be bringing up the major red flags first.

“Carbs: Starchy carbs coming from breads, pastas, grains, potatoes, etc are converted into glucose. Your liver can only hold about 70g of glucose and a little more elsewhere. If there is too much glucose in your system, your body will store it as fat. So be careful with it.* “

This is the first major red flag and anyone that has the relevant qualifications (That would be me by the way) in basic nutrition or anatomy would have simply not bothered reading the rest of your post. Luckily for others, due to my profession I see it as a duty of care to combat misinformation like this.

The Liver only needs to hold a small amount of Glycogen, because the rest is stored in skeletal muscle (a hell of a lot more dramatic than “A little elsewhere”). This is one of the reasons that carbohydrate's are a quick release energy system, especially for athletes. This is basic, bread and butter science.

As for glucose being stored as fat, that's simply to do with overeating compared to your total daily energy expenditure. Something that won't happen if you're on the correct calorie controlled diet primed for weight loss.

“FYI: Your arteries aren't clogged by eating too much cholesterol. Your body produces about 2000mg of cholesterol a day. If you are are consuming more in your diet, your body will produce less. When it comes to arteries and heart issues, glucose causes inflamation in the artery walls. Your body will send Cholesterol there to repair it and it will build up.

Now this is a colossal red flag right here. It actually had me considering contacting a moderator to delete this just in case some unlucky reader took this information on board. I can't believe I'm having to explain that too much cholesterol will kill you. Notice I said too much. Cholesterol in the correct doses is good for you but too much (specificly LDL & saturated fats) will lead to:

Atherosclerosis

This is when a diet containing too much LDL cholesterol causes plaque to build up on the arterial walls, clogging them/causing inflammation and restricting blood flow which leads to heart attack. Just in case anyone was wondering, heart attacks are bad. If you are looking for a source on this, go ask your local doctor. Just to make a bullet point on this, within the next month I am taking a higher education course to gain a referrals qualification. This means Doctors would be able to send clients to me for personal training and dietary advice for lowering such things as...you guessed it, high cholesterol.

As for glucose causing inflammation, its obesity that causes inflammation whether its from carbs or fats. The reason why sugar is demonised as the main culprit for health problems is because the majority of the public don't realise how easy it is to over consume calories that involve sugars. Here is a credible source on sugar/carbs and its relation to fat loss. By the way, Dr Layne Norton is THE man when it come to nutrition and busting myths. Anyone looking for science backed nutritional education should follow his work. He is also kind enough to explain the sugar equals inflammation myth.

https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...-fat-loss.html

Last edited by Nirv : 06-14-2017 at 10:38 AM.
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Unread 06-08-2017, 11:58 AM   #11
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I had to split this into three posts I'm afraid due to the character limit.



“Not to mention that glucose as well as sugars (fructose) spike insulin causing blood sugar crashes. Ever get a weak feeling after not eating for awhile, like you really need to eat? This is caused from that. Do this too much and you become insulin resistant, and fat quickly builds up.”

Red flag number 3.

Ah, this old chestnut. Insulin resistance isn't cause by sugar alone, its caused by Metabolic Syndrome. Is it bad to have too much sugar? Of course it is, just like its bad to have too much of anything including fats. Dr Layne Norton explains insulin sensitivity and its relation to fat burning.

https://www.biolayne.com/media/video...ulin-fat-loss/

https://www.muscleforlife.com/how-insulin-works/ Is another useful link, especially in regards to the "insulin stops you burning/makes you fat!" Nonsense.

“If everyone was eating low fat, we wouldn't have as many issues with obesity and heart disease as we do. But here we are, 2017 and it's only gotten worse (to the day) that carbs were made out to be the baseline of our diets. Carb and sugar laden cereals labeled as "fat free!" and "heart healthy!", a bag of gummy bears "fat free food!!!" So that means it's healthy right? u_u;; “”

There is an obesity/cardiovascular epidemic because the majority population eat more but move less. Blaming it on a single macronutrient is plain ignorant. If you eat 500 more calories worth of fat a day compared to your energy expenditure you will gain weight. If you eat 500 more calories worth of carbohydrates (whether its simple or complex carbs) a day compared to your energy expenditure you will gain weight. Once again this is simple science. Why anyone still argues against the calories in/calories out equation in this day and age makes me fear for the future of our species.

“Protein:*Protein is good, but unless you are doing some serious training, excess protein consumed will be converted into glucose. This is also one reason why if you go on a low calorie restrictive diet, you might experience muscle loss. If your body is running strictly on glucose, it will start turning to your muscle tissue for that energy. However, when you are fueled by fat, your body goes after the fat in your diet followed by the fat on your body once what bit of glycogen your liver may have stored from the veggies you've eaten. “

This doesn't even physiologically make sense...I'm assuming we are still talking about losing weight right? Well once you've burned though your fat you are still going to burn into muscle. Burning into muscle comes with the territory of losing weight and is pretty much unavoidable. It can however be minimised (If you are active/training) by taking certain supplements or increasing your protein intake. Once again it will only be converted to glucose and stored as fat if you are in a calorie surplus . I'm getting bored of saying this, but once again this is entry level science.

If you are in a calorie deficit, then you have already pre planned to burn through your Carbs, fats and then reserve fat. That's whether you're on either a high-carb low-fat or low-carb high-fat diet...either way it doesn't matter, if you've planned correctly then those energy sources will soon be burned through before getting to the adipose tissue (the fat we want to lose).

I think you need to look up the laws of thermodynamics. Its the science and relation between energy expenditure and the micronutrients involved.

“Sleep:*Benefits from working out occur when you are asleep. If you are not getting at least 8 hours of sleep and getting some good REM time, all that working out will go to waste. Your body produces a growth hormone and the greatest fat loss happens while sleeping when your body is repairing itself. Work out and get some good rest. “

Although there is a greater improvement of biological repair, claiming that “all that working out will go to waste” is just silly. Body function and repair does not simply stop because we are awake.

“Keep in mind that a low calorie diet WILL mess up your metabolism. Your body has a natural reset point after weight loss, and it's easy to go back to it even if you are generally being mindful about your consumption. “


Wrong, just simply wrong. This is actually a popular bro science myth that infuriates me.

Your body/brain may eventually regulate the way it uses up energy sources which could cause a plateau, but its no way near as bad as the way you have sensationalised it and can easily be fixed by a few change to activity and nutrition. Here is an article on Metabolic Damage from a credible source.

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/metabolic-damage

“Keep in mind that human beings did not consume grains only until around 12,000 years ago. Before that, humans lived in hunter-gatherer tribes where we ate primarily meats and whatever else the land around us provided. Our diets were pretty high in protein and fat, but early humans might've had to go a long time without any meals if there were droughts, herd shortages, or no good results from hunts. 12,000 years in the scale of human evolution is maybe an hour, and the guidelines in the 1970's pushing for the baseline of our diets being carbohydrates probably 1 minute. And since that study (which was severely flawed, btw.) obesity shot up as soon as "low fat" began being marketed as a way to promote heart health. “

I don't understand this argument. Tribes men who lacked a breakthrough in agriculture and technology only ate meat so we should do the same now? Back then we didn't have planes, cars, or penicillin so for some irrelevant reason we had better stop using those too. We are a species that adapted just enough to realise we could fuel ourselves on a plentiful (and sustainable) diet known as carbs, so what.

As for the “flawed” study, publish the link please. If you mean the “Food plate” or dietary advice that was recommended in the 70's then this is irrelevant as it has since changed. One again the problem is not fats, carbs or proteins, its simple over eating that has caused the health epidemic.

Last edited by Nirv : 06-08-2017 at 12:45 PM.
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Unread 06-08-2017, 11:58 AM   #12
Nirv
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Red face

“While you can consume too many calories, what you are eating has a greater impact on your health and fat storage/loss rather than calories. Bodies differ, hormone levels which control fat storage and loss differ from person to person. Keep this in mind.“

Hormones control transportation and storage. Yes, but what is the point you are trying to make?

No, what you are/are not eating is not more important than staying at a healthy weight. Is it important to get the majority of your diet from healthy foods? Yes, of course it is, but even if you are over eating those and become obese, you're still going to be in a much worst position than say someone that is normal weight, but has a poorer diet. Here is a link confirming this from a recent study.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedh...heart-disease/

“Eat a good diet and move around a bit more and for most people it will help. But if you are looking at serious weight loss, a calorie restrictive diet might actually cause more harm than good. Been there, done that. Our diet is full of carbs and that's probably the worst thing to eat for weight loss. Here's why... in my lengthy post. “

Just because a certain diet didn't work for you does not mean it won't work for others. I explain towards the end that you've more than probably missed calculated your BMR and TDEE.

*“It would've required me eating 1200 calories most days just to maintain my weight with how bad a low calorie diet wrecked my system. I went from 215 in 2004, lost a bit due to more activity but hovered around 175-195 from then on. Then in 2012 I went from 175 to 145 by 2014 with ups and downs here and there. Lots of yo-yoing a lot of eating 1200 calories (and a lot of it was bread and pasta in small portions). I gained it all back and as of April 30th, I was at 192lbs AGAIN. “

Your calorie calculations make zero sense. 1200 just to maintain? Calculations show that a 20 year old female, who is only 4 foot, weighing at 155lbs and sedentary would require atleast 1750 calories to maintain weight. Thats got nothing to do with screwing up your metabolism, that's just screwing up math.

“I've been on a ketogenic diet for a month now, dropped 12lbs in a month and roughly 3" off my waist. I have amazing energy and feel great, positive, happy and I have no blood sugar issues like I did before. Name any issue and this diet has probably helped me. I don't really count calories. But I pay more attention to making sure I hit my macros: 5-10% carbs, 25-30% protein and 70-75% fat. I eat a lot more fresh food now and have been off starchy carbs and sugar.* “

Congratulations on your weight loss and I do genuinely mean that.

However the reality is the first month of keto, majority of weight loss is water weight. I mentioned its got health benefits, but it also has a number of bad points including:

-Inital rapid weight loss is largely water.
-Very Restrictive and hard to sustain in the long run.
-Severely inhibits the energy levels of athletic performance.
-Bad Breath.
-High Cholesterol without nutritional knowledge.

Can you lose weight through keto? Of course you can. Do you know why? Exactly the same reason as you can lose it through any other diet. Calories in < Calories out. You may not be counting calories with keto, but you're probably in a deficit without realising. This is a popular benefit of keto because high fats/protein is satiating meaning you fill more full and have less desire to eat more. A ketogenic diet can actually be beneficial for those that lack the self control when it comes to carbs.

But what it comes down to is calories in vs calories out. Whether its high carb and low fat, or low fat and high carb, or paleo, IIFYM, Atkins etc etc, it all comes down to calories.

Regretably, the ketogenic diet has brought with it a fan base of zealots that let the diet down. I'm not biased towards any specific diet. I am just a man of science.

Is eating carbs/sugar bad? Absolutely Not

Is eating too much carbs/sugar bad? Of Course

And the same goes for fat.


Bobbi, I wish you luck with your ketogenic diet. If in the near future you decide that you want to know your calorie intake depending on goals, send me a PM and I'll happily work through the calculations with you.

On a side note, I may open up a Q & A thread for anything fitness related. If I feel I don't have the correct credentials to answer, then I will be honest and say I don't know. To give people a little more faith in my knowledge, I may include a little more in who I am, my occupation as a fitness instructor (and recently qualified) Personal trainer and the further education I am currently in (possible a Sports nutrition diploma before the year is over) and how I went from an 90kg blob to a 68kg athlete.
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Unread 07-07-2017, 10:14 PM   #13
Keebablue
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Nirv im really glad you kinda helped previous poster with the facts. The comment about it making the blood sugar better actully worried me. I myself am unfortunate enough to be in the *pre* diabetic category ( normal weight- and i exercise, just a shitty genetic flaw), and the whole thing with ketones is/ can be *very* bad for pre/diabetics, and i would really hate for someone to seek that, and think to try it.

As far as the carbs/protien and blood sugar, as you've talked about those Bobbi; I can tell you that Protien is actually *very* important in helping to keep blood sugar levels stable. A good bit of protien paired with the carbs in your meal ( fruit or from breads, pasta, potatoes, corn etc) is a good thing. Carbs and sugar are not the enemy when you eat properly. If you were to cut out all carbs/sugar, youd pretty much be eating *nothing* but greens. Veggies have *no* significant sugar content. Because fruit? Fruit is sugar and carbs- a single cup of cherries alone contains around 18 g carbs- all from the natural sugars. Vegetables are *not* a good source of carbs, period. The amount youd have to consume to hit anywhere near your body's carb needs is insanely high, and youd never accomplish it. This is why diabetics are encouraged to eat as much veggies as they like (excluding a few like potatoes, corn, peas for example), beaucse they contain no carbs (sugar) and will not raise the blood sugar. (The same also applies to fat/protien, i.e. Neither raises blood sugar)
You also mention your allergies cleared up? My suspicion there is that you were consuming a food that was from an outside source your allergic to- though it isnt common. For example, I am *extremely* allergic to all types of grasses. When all wheat was cut from my diet, my *symptoms* vastly improved and i was able to go off all but 1 allergy medicine. Its not because my allergy went away, or was cured, but that my histamine load was much lower and I wasn't *symptomatic*. My allergy still exists. This can be the same for fruits and vegetables as well. A food allergy can manifest with itchy eyes, post nasal drip, stuffy nose and sneezing just like from pollen or dander- though as I understand currently, it is not super common.

Anyway... rant done. XD I personally get a large portion of my carbs from fruit rather than things like bread/pasta because of my wheat allergy. Finding wheat free bread, crackers and other junk is like twice the price- though that usually ends up with me over my daily sugar allowance. (My body seems to process the fruits better than the bread/pasta anyway). I begrudgingly eat vegitation because im supposed to, but i dont like it. ;P I eat a lot of fat and protien as well. And though I do on average consume fewer calories than i burn; i do fluctuate the amount based on what activity ive done that day. I.e, if ive spent a few hours skating, i tend to up my calories a little bit (so i *dont* end up in a heavy ketosis state.)

In the end, the best thing to do if you can, is speak to a nutritionist. They can best advise you based on your own personal health how to best eat to loose weight and be more *healthy*

Sorry if i went off topic >.<
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Unread 07-09-2017, 01:54 PM   #14
LordTyger
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Speak to a -good- nutritionist. That part's important. I talked to mine and got the basic rundown you can find anywhere, including 'advice' that simply isn't feasible. I was less than impressed. -.-
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Unread 07-11-2017, 06:41 AM   #15
Nirv
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@keebablue - thank you for commenting, it's beneficial and educational to hear from someone that actually has (or alteast pre) diabetes and their experience with it.. Sorry if I'm making you out as a lab rat, definitely not my intent! I wish the best of luck for your health

@LordTyger - although I understand what you mean, what makes a "good" nutritionist and how would we know we are speaking to one without prior knowledge of what should make one "good"? Perhaps a friend recommends a "good" nutrionist simply because that nutrionist has told them they are good, but then goes on to tell them protein will destroy their liver, or only lemon peel will save them from cancer etc etc.

Most of the time the reason why advice or information can be found anywhere, is because it's common science or basic unarguable nutritional (however the public may still be unaware of this information, or mislead). If you ask a mathematician what 2 + 2 is and he tells you 4, then naturally you will find the same answer "anywhere".

Also take in to account that like most regulated industries, nutrionists learn from the same curriculum therefore they are likely to promote the same guidelines and advice. To me, a good nutrionist would be someone who is unbiased and keeps up to date with the latest science and peer reviewed studies. A bad one would be someone who becomes emotionally attached to their beliefs and unwilling to further educate themselves.

Edit - I want to point out that being from the UK I'm unaware of how strict/regulated nutrionist professionals are in the US. In my country in order to teach fitness or give nutritional advice you have to be qualified.

Last edited by Nirv : 07-11-2017 at 06:44 AM.
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