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Unread 05-22-2017, 09:15 PM   #1
Kekewy
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Muscles overworked and aching, can't stop overworking them. Help!

Okay so I have a interesting dilemma. My job sometimes requires me to walk for about 10 hours straight, sometimes being anywhere from 2-4 days a week. This kills my legs and by the end of the week my legs hurt so bad I can hardly walk. I have a few days off but it's not enough time to recover before I have to start the whole process again. I can't not do the job that requires this much walking without a doctor's excuse and 'I'm too out of shape for this stuff' isn't a valid reason to get out of a job anyway. So, I need to figure out something to deal with the sore and achy muscles until I, hopefully, get used to it and they stop hurting. I'm taking Tylenol and ibuprofen to help with the pain, but I need a better solution. Does anyone have any tips or tricks to help the pain go away? Or at least make it more tolerable? Extra exercises to help my legs adjust to the added exercise faster, I'm open for anything at this point.
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Unread 05-22-2017, 09:29 PM   #2
ShinobiXikyu
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Epsom salt baths, stretching your legs before/after work, and drinking some milk after a shift will all help. A lot of muscle soreness is caused by lactic acid buildup, all of the above help it go away quicker.
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There's a vibe here that says "We're in this together!Through thick and thin fabric! Through cold water washes and burning hot irons! Though we might super glue ourselves to our projects, cut holes/gashes/oh-god-mom's-gonna-kill-me into the dining room table, we will stand strong together. Unless there is a 75% off sale at the Fabric store. Then you're on your own. And get the hell out of my way."<3
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Unread 05-22-2017, 09:33 PM   #3
Kekewy
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Do you have any examples of stretches that might help? We do some stretching before work, it's a mandatory thing, but they don't seem to be helping.
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Unread 05-22-2017, 09:52 PM   #4
ShinobiXikyu
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I used to do ballet and jiujitsu, but it's been a while. And we always stretched before and after for both warmup and cooldown, stretching only before just keeps you from injuring stiff/too-cold muscles, stretching after is what helps you from getting extra soreness and stiffness. What I mostly remember doing- stretching your calves (lean forward in a lunge, back foot flat on the floor), touching your toes, stretching quadriceps (the old-fashioned really easily bringing your foot up to your butt and giving your leg a stretch that way), the hamstrings (hug your leg to your chest), flexing your toes/ankles to stretch your feet and both sides of your lower leg, and also stretching the sides of your legs by trying some form of splits (if you can't sit on the floor, stretch your legs directly out to the side of you, then upward too (knee to your shoulder kind of position, but your leg should be against your side, not your front), and hold as long as you can. Doesn't HAVE to be held straight out and you usually have to work up to it, but it helps). Those are pretty standard ones, I don't have any others that aren't just really specific to dance (and those ones were for flexibility more than anything, not helping with muscle soreness).
My biggest recommendation is the epsom salts. My friends who trained for black belts, and my Mom who works in construction, all swear by having a soak in them if they're sore.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moofingham View Post
There's a vibe here that says "We're in this together!Through thick and thin fabric! Through cold water washes and burning hot irons! Though we might super glue ourselves to our projects, cut holes/gashes/oh-god-mom's-gonna-kill-me into the dining room table, we will stand strong together. Unless there is a 75% off sale at the Fabric store. Then you're on your own. And get the hell out of my way."<3
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Unread 05-24-2017, 02:06 PM   #5
Nirv
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Fitness Instructor here.

I am going to assume this is a relatively new job? If not, it would be helpful to clarify.

Anyway, first of I want to tell you not to worry. The human body is very adaptive and eventually the more (and further) you walk, the easier you will find it due to increased muscular and cardiovascular endurance/health. This is called progressive overload. If you're out of shape, believe me, you soon will be if you're doing a high number of steps. However in regards to this, you may want to research that you're getting adequate nutrition
And microvitamins not just to fuel your long hours of activity, but to aid in the repair and recovery of your legs.

As for the soreness, this is called DOMS, Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness. Basically what this means is you could be fine after your shift, but 24/42 hours later the aching tenderness appears. Science has been unable to pinpoint why DOMS occur, however it's widely agreed that it's probably due to micro tearing of the muscle fibres during strenuous activity. Contrary to what we used to believe, DOMS isn't directly caused by lactic acid. There is no overnight cure I'm afraid, however the following can alleviate the pain, or even stunt the severity of DOMS before even performing the physical activity.

1 - Hot baths/sauna's/steam rooms. Hot baths are the basic go to for alleviating DOMS, why? Saturating your body in hot water causes more blood flow to the muscles which promote healing.

2 - Stretching. There's two types that are useful for DOMS which I'll explain seperately. If you're looking for demonstrations, then google the following types of stretching.

2a - Dynamic stretching. This is a stretch that also involves movement, such as kicking the leg back and forth. This is useful because not only does it pump blood to the muscles you are stretching, it doesn't cause you to lose power unlike Static Stretching. Personally, I aim to do 8 reps of dynamic stretching movements before a workout, on each muscle group. This also benefits your joints by producing more synovial fluid in cartilage, basically giving you more cushioning/shock absorption.

2b - Static Stretching. This is the the average idea of "stretching" that comes to mind of the majority of people. It's when you stretch a specific muscle and hold it for a certain period of time. There's another sub genre of stretches under static but I would recommend Maintenance Stretching which is holding the specific stretch for 15 seconds. This not only rushes blood to the stretched muscle, it also returns it back to its original length. Static stretches can temporarily cause the muscle to lose some power however, so consider performing them after work or on your days off.

3 - Foam roller. This is a "self" massage device which gives deep tissue massage. I have one myself and tend to use them after heavy squats or sprints. However you could also use a simple tennis ball.

There is a 4th but I don't think you'll like it. Light walking is actually another aid of recovery funny enough, because once again it promotes blood flow! However I'm sure it's the last thing you'll want to do if your job involves walking all day.

I hope this helps. If you have any questions either by PM or by replying to your thread I'll happily answer. I'm gonna be shameless and advertise my Instagram for other fitness tips such as these, it's pintsandpushups .

Last edited by Nirv : 05-24-2017 at 02:14 PM. Reason: Punctuation
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Unread 05-24-2017, 07:09 PM   #6
Dictamnus Albus
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just a reminder, exceeding dosage for tylenol (acetemenephan) is concidered, "toxic levels"
(even potentialy a "fatal dosage")

if ibuprophen dont work, try asprin
naproxen is also a diferant medicine
excedrine is a combo drug (tylenol,ibupropen,caffene) id try to stay clear of combo drugs

personaly for me ibprophen helps with neck tension and backaches
asprin for headaches (not caused by neck tension) or soreness cause by minor injury
(like the door mashing your elbow while trying to hustle groceries inside)
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Last edited by Dictamnus Albus : 05-24-2017 at 07:16 PM.
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Unread 08-28-2017, 08:56 PM   #7
Kekewy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nirv View Post
Fitness Instructor here.

I am going to assume this is a relatively new job? If not, it would be helpful to clarify.

Anyway, first of I want to tell you not to worry. The human body is very adaptive and eventually the more (and further) you walk, the easier you will find it due to increased muscular and cardiovascular endurance/health. This is called progressive overload. If you're out of shape, believe me, you soon will be if you're doing a high number of steps. However in regards to this, you may want to research that you're getting adequate nutrition
And microvitamins not just to fuel your long hours of activity, but to aid in the repair and recovery of your legs.

As for the soreness, this is called DOMS, Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness. Basically what this means is you could be fine after your shift, but 24/42 hours later the aching tenderness appears. Science has been unable to pinpoint why DOMS occur, however it's widely agreed that it's probably due to micro tearing of the muscle fibres during strenuous activity. Contrary to what we used to believe, DOMS isn't directly caused by lactic acid. There is no overnight cure I'm afraid, however the following can alleviate the pain, or even stunt the severity of DOMS before even performing the physical activity.

1 - Hot baths/sauna's/steam rooms. Hot baths are the basic go to for alleviating DOMS, why? Saturating your body in hot water causes more blood flow to the muscles which promote healing.

2 - Stretching. There's two types that are useful for DOMS which I'll explain seperately. If you're looking for demonstrations, then google the following types of stretching.

2a - Dynamic stretching. This is a stretch that also involves movement, such as kicking the leg back and forth. This is useful because not only does it pump blood to the muscles you are stretching, it doesn't cause you to lose power unlike Static Stretching. Personally, I aim to do 8 reps of dynamic stretching movements before a workout, on each muscle group. This also benefits your joints by producing more synovial fluid in cartilage, basically giving you more cushioning/shock absorption.

2b - Static Stretching. This is the the average idea of "stretching" that comes to mind of the majority of people. It's when you stretch a specific muscle and hold it for a certain period of time. There's another sub genre of stretches under static but I would recommend Maintenance Stretching which is holding the specific stretch for 15 seconds. This not only rushes blood to the stretched muscle, it also returns it back to its original length. Static stretches can temporarily cause the muscle to lose some power however, so consider performing them after work or on your days off.

3 - Foam roller. This is a "self" massage device which gives deep tissue massage. I have one myself and tend to use them after heavy squats or sprints. However you could also use a simple tennis ball.

There is a 4th but I don't think you'll like it. Light walking is actually another aid of recovery funny enough, because once again it promotes blood flow! However I'm sure it's the last thing you'll want to do if your job involves walking all day.

I hope this helps. If you have any questions either by PM or by replying to your thread I'll happily answer. I'm gonna be shameless and advertise my Instagram for other fitness tips such as these, it's pintsandpushups .
It's not a new job, unfortunately. The department I usually work in doesn't have a lot of work, so they're sending a bunch of people, myself included, to another department to help them clear their work. Usually this trade off happens a couple days a week for a month, then they stop. I can handle that okay. Lately it's been pretty much every day, with almost no breaks. And sadly, they don't allow you to opt out of being shared to the other department without a doctor's note.
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Unread 08-31-2017, 02:16 AM   #8
Viveeh
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Painkillers are dangerous, I would suggest natural options like cannabis if you're in a location where it's not criminalized.
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Unread 08-31-2017, 05:43 PM   #9
Kekewy
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Painkillers are dangerous, I would suggest natural options like cannabis if you're in a location where it's not criminalized.
My job does random drug tests and specifically tests for cannabis, not to mention I'm pretty sure it's illegal where I live. I'm very careful about the amount and type of pain killers I use. I'm well aware of their dangers and only use them when absolutely necessary.
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Unread 09-11-2017, 01:04 AM   #10
BeanBunny
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I second everything Nirv said, but particularly the foam roller. Also look into a theracane and a gua sha scraper if you feel like the foam roller isn't getting the job done. Those are a little more heavy duty. You'll hate me for a little while the day after, but then you'll feel like you have totally new legs.
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Unread 09-15-2017, 10:54 AM   #11
Schuldig_
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To add to what people have been saying: the importance of good shoes that support your feet and legs can not be stressed enough. See if you can talk to someone selling ergonomic shoes and explain to them what you need.
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