Go Back   Cosplay.com > Cosplay Construction > Sewing/Fabric Craft

Reply
Thread Tools
Unread 10-11-2017, 06:50 PM   #1
Respawning
Registered User
 
Respawning's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 672
need advice: boning/seam allowance for duct tape corset?

I am looking to do Ciri's corset from the Witcher 3 game:




I have made a duct tape pattern off mysef, but am wondering, from you more knowledgable types, how much seam allowance I should add for boning? I am looking for the boning to mostly add structure as opposed to be for any real waist cinching (although that would be great). Also, this corset doesn't appear to have a lacing panel according to the game, so either I would have to have a hidden panel or just a zipper or hooks in the front. Is there a way to hide lacing? Or would it be best just to go with a zipper, as I have seen others do?
__________________
Make good art. ~Neil Gaiman

Completed costumes:Commander Shepard, Steampunk Valkyrie OC, Tiefling Sorcerer OC, Morrigan, Thor, Daenerys Targaryen, Steampunk OC
Future costumes: Aloy, Maleficent, Satyr/Faun OC, Galadriel
Working on: Ciri Witcher 3


Instagram, Facebook, Facebook Group
Respawning is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Unread 10-11-2017, 08:02 PM   #2
lunaflora
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 176
So, if you're using the poly boning with the premade casing, the seam allowance doesn't matter since it already has a casing. If you are using something without a premade casing, it really depends on how wide the boning you are using is. If you topstitch the seam allowance to one side( I would, it strengthens the seam. If it is going to be tight I would NOT advise pressing the seam open, unless you are laying a bone casing over the seam ), that takes a bit away from the seam allowance that you can use as a casing. I would go boning width + half an inch, just to be safe. You can always trim it later. Or you can just make your own boning channel by sewing together a tube of fabric and stitching that to the body instead of using the seam allowances.
A tightlacing corset would have to be boned with steel. You could probably get away with heavy duty cable ties for something that doesn't reduce much (maybe 4 or 2 inches) but I highly recommend you use steel for anything more. Steel boning comes in half inch or quarter inch widths so its up to you. It also comes in Spiral/Coil boning or Flat/Spring/White boning. Spiral is for curves and side-to side movement. Flat is for rigidity and stiffer structure. I generally use flat steel for the center front and closure, and spirals anywhere else.
In either case if you use a hook and eye or a zipper, I highly highly recommend you bone either side of the closure as well if it's going to be relatively tight. I see too many where the closure collapses from the tension. You get a much cleaner smoother look if you bone either side. I would personally go with a zipper in the front, it seems like an appropriate place for it. Hook and eyes are too fussy to put on and off.
If you plan to make it tightlacing, you're going to have to use lacing. Don't use a zipper with laces. You might be better off using a hook and eye with laces, but I would just use lacing instead without closure.
You can hide lacing, but it just involves a second closure to cover the laces, in which case you may as well just go with another closure method. If you were to do a tightlacing corset. You can have a second closure that covers the laces (which is basically the same pattern pieces as the ones being laced together, adding a bit to account for lacing gap/bulk from the laces, with a closure added to it, and sew the lacing panels and the outer closure panel at the seams joining to the rest of the corset body as one). That way you can cinch the waist without having a laced back showing.

EDIT: Looking at the photos closer, I would actually go with 1/4 inch boning on either side of the topstitched seam, so it will be double-boned Or you can use a 1/2 inch bone centered at the seams. For this, if it will reduce the waist at all, I would use a separate bone casing instead of using seam allowances, stitching the edges of the casing down so you get the two rows of stitching on either side of the seam. Another method is to use the sandwich method of making a corset , which you could look up (my post is already super long), and stitch boning channels on either side of the seams.

Edit: don't press the seams open if the corset is tight. Made a typo. Fixed it in the body but fixed it again here.

Last edited by lunaflora : 10-13-2017 at 09:40 AM.
lunaflora is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-11-2017, 11:44 PM   #3
Respawning
Registered User
 
Respawning's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 672
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunaflora View Post
So, if you're using the poly boning with the premade casing, the seam allowance doesn't matter since it already has a casing. If you are using something without a premade casing, it really depends on how wide the boning you are using is. If you topstitch the seam allowance to one side( I would, it strengthens the seam. If it is going to be tight I would advise pressing the seam open, unless you are laying a bone casing over the seam ), that takes a bit away from the seam allowance that you can use as a casing. I would go boning width + half an inch, just to be safe. You can always trim it later. Or you can just make your own boning channel by sewing together a tube of fabric and stitching that to the body instead of using the seam allowances.
A tightlacing corset would have to be boned with steel. You could probably get away with heavy duty cable ties for something that doesn't reduce much (maybe 4 or 2 inches) but I highly recommend you use steel for anything more. Steel boning comes in half inch or quarter inch widths so its up to you. It also comes in Spiral/Coil boning or Flat/Spring/White boning. Spiral is for curves and side-to side movement. Flat is for rigidity and stiffer structure. I generally use flat steel for the center front and closure, and spirals anywhere else.
In either case if you use a hook and eye or a zipper, I highly highly recommend you bone either side of the closure as well if it's going to be relatively tight. I see too many where the closure collapses from the tension. You get a much cleaner smoother look if you bone either side. I would personally go with a zipper in the front, it seems like an appropriate place for it. Hook and eyes are too fussy to put on and off.
If you plan to make it tightlacing, you're going to have to use lacing. Don't use a zipper with laces. You might be better off using a hook and eye with laces, but I would just use lacing instead without closure.
You can hide lacing, but it just involves a second closure to cover the laces, in which case you may as well just go with another closure method. If you were to do a tightlacing corset. You can have a second closure that covers the laces (which is basically the same pattern pieces as the ones being laced together, adding a bit to account for lacing gap/bulk from the laces, with a closure added to it, and sew the lacing panels and the outer closure panel at the seams joining to the rest of the corset body as one). That way you can cinch the waist without having a laced back showing.

EDIT: Looking at the photos closer, I would actually go with 1/4 inch boning on either side of the topstitched seam, so it will be double-boned Or you can use a 1/2 inch bone centered at the seams. For this, if it will reduce the waist at all, I would use a separate bone casing instead of using seam allowances, stitching the edges of the casing down so you get the two rows of stitching on either side of the seam. Another method is to use the sandwich method of making a corset , which you could look up (my post is already super long), and stitch boning channels on either side of the seams.

wow, that is a lot of great advice, thank you! Can I ask another question: on the sides of this corset there are a sort of semi-circular piece that sits right on the hip, would I put boning vertically through that, or avoid it? Also, would you recommend the lining to be all attached to my faux leather and strength layer, or 'float' it over all of it by only attaching it to the top and bottom?
__________________
Make good art. ~Neil Gaiman

Completed costumes:Commander Shepard, Steampunk Valkyrie OC, Tiefling Sorcerer OC, Morrigan, Thor, Daenerys Targaryen, Steampunk OC
Future costumes: Aloy, Maleficent, Satyr/Faun OC, Galadriel
Working on: Ciri Witcher 3


Instagram, Facebook, Facebook Group
Respawning is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-12-2017, 12:15 AM   #4
lunaflora
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 176
Those are called hip gores, and there's a couple ways you can tackle this. you can put a boning at the side seam, right through the gore. Or separate the gore into two pieces so you have an actual side seam for the boning channel. You can actually feed a 1/4 inch spiral steel bone into the hip curve seam and heavily interface the hip gore itself so that it doesn't need any boning (usually use see quilting/cording on the hip gores for this reason). Another option is to have the fashion fabric have the gore, but the strength layer not have a gore, and have the boning be at the side seam of the strength layer.

Unless you are using the sandwich method of construction, or have the seam allowance actually be on the outside of the corset(so the inside is smooth), I would float the lining instead. Another option is to cover the seam allowances with your bone casings and just leave it at that, or add a floating lining to that as well.
lunaflora is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-12-2017, 08:48 AM   #5
Penlowe
Registered User
 
Penlowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,279
A note on the hip gores: this character is drawn with very narrow hips and proportioned fairly tall, you might find the overall silhouette on your body very different. While I appreciate she isn't a gaming/ anime huge boob tiny waist character, she is still drawn 'ideal' 5'10" 120 pounds ish. YMMV
__________________
Nothing is impossible, but some things are very expensive.
https://3lists.wordpress.com/ Instagram: penlowe
My Etsy shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/penlowe I make non-fitted custom things to ship within the continental US. I only do fitted garments for those whom I can meet in person.
Penlowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:47 PM.


Copyright 2002-2017 Cosplay.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
All comments and posts in our forums are the opinion of the respective poster.