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Unread 06-03-2018, 07:04 PM   #1
Yikes!
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Flat Patterning issue: Bodice back won't close/too tight

So, I'm practicing my flat patterning and I made this bodice. The front fits perfect but when I attempt to close the back it's too tight/won't close all the way. I made the bodice 3 times, I added seam allowance and my measurements are right so whats wrong???


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Unread 06-03-2018, 07:58 PM   #2
CapsuleCorp
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I honestly can't tell from the photos what you mean. I see pins holding it closed, that means it closes?? Or do you mean just at the bottom?

If you try on a mockup and it doesn't fit, obviously something is incorrect. You just have to figure out where alter seams to make the thing fit again. If your seams in the hip area are preventing the bottom from closing, clearly it's seamed too tightly and you have to let it out. If the seam allowance combined across all the bodice seams isn't enough to allow you to simply let out the bodice enough to finally fit, you'll have to recut it with more fabric in the areas that don't fit. If this is a mockup, don't bother recutting and simply tack on fabric and tweak your seams until it's the way you want it.

I'm genuinely unsure what you're attempting to do and what the actual problem is. If you're just practicing making mockups, there's no reason to keep recutting. The fun of a mockup pattern is that it doesn't matter what the thing looks like as long as it serves the purpose of fitting you and then being cut apart to make the final pattern for the garment. Most of my mockups have chunks of scrap muslin basted across the shapes to add on smidges of extra, Sharpie lines all over showing where my new seams need to be, and occasionally pins I forgot to take out. This includes my own slopers for fitted pants and dress shirts that I frequently re-use. Also, if you're fitting to the dress form only and not something for you and your body, the dress form itself may just be wrong. They're adjustable around the circumference but the molded boobs and shoulders are static, so if your own measurements are at all different (underbust higher or lower, actual bust larger or smaller, shoulders wider or narrower) then fitting it to a dress form with the same numbers on the dials as your measurements may not be correct after all. I never rely solely on my dress form to drape for clients since they're all different, I usually just use it to test certain areas in the mockup or pattern stage of the project.
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Unread 06-03-2018, 08:19 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CapsuleCorp View Post
I honestly can't tell from the photos what you mean. I see pins holding it closed, that means it closes?? Or do you mean just at the bottom?

If you try on a mockup and it doesn't fit, obviously something is incorrect. You just have to figure out where alter seams to make the thing fit again. If your seams in the hip area are preventing the bottom from closing, clearly it's seamed too tightly and you have to let it out. If the seam allowance combined across all the bodice seams isn't enough to allow you to simply let out the bodice enough to finally fit, you'll have to recut it with more fabric in the areas that don't fit. If this is a mockup, don't bother recutting and simply tack on fabric and tweak your seams until it's the way you want it.

I'm genuinely unsure what you're attempting to do and what the actual problem is. If you're just practicing making mockups, there's no reason to keep recutting. The fun of a mockup pattern is that it doesn't matter what the thing looks like as long as it serves the purpose of fitting you and then being cut apart to make the final pattern for the garment. Most of my mockups have chunks of scrap muslin basted across the shapes to add on smidges of extra, Sharpie lines all over showing where my new seams need to be, and occasionally pins I forgot to take out. This includes my own slopers for fitted pants and dress shirts that I frequently re-use. Also, if you're fitting to the dress form only and not something for you and your body, the dress form itself may just be wrong. They're adjustable around the circumference but the molded boobs and shoulders are static, so if your own measurements are at all different (underbust higher or lower, actual bust larger or smaller, shoulders wider or narrower) then fitting it to a dress form with the same numbers on the dials as your measurements may not be correct after all. I never rely solely on my dress form to drape for clients since they're all different, I usually just use it to test certain areas in the mockup or pattern stage of the project.
Noticed how much fabric there is pinned at the top of the back compared to the bottom. Shouldn't it all be even or is it suppose to get tighter/smaller as it goes down? I recently took out the back darts, which kind of fixed the issue. I'm worried that when I put the zipper in parts of the zipper is going to show at the bottom back.
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Unread 06-04-2018, 08:13 AM   #4
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Ok, but you didn't answer his question about fitting the dress form or YOU. Unless by some extremely unusual circumstance, you are shaped EXACTLY like the dress form, it doesn't matter if it's right on the form if it fits YOU. Even top tier runway models, who get the job because they are close to being shaped like dress forms, have to have the dresses tweaked on their bodies for perfect fit before the shows.

If this is fitting the form as practice, it doesn't have to fit any particular real human, then your error was where you applied the various measurements to your pattern.
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Unread 06-04-2018, 08:57 AM   #5
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Re-adjust your dress form so it's exactly the same shape as your body. If you haven't done this very recently, all your other work is for naught.

Fitting it on your body, instead of the dress form, is an even better idea - but it's very hard to do this without a friend or helper.


If you're using a commercial pattern, you will have to make minor (and sometimes major) adjustments along the way. he bust-waist-hip ratio on the commercial pattern doesn't match any actual person, even if you try to go by the sizing guides in the instructions. You must be prepared to adjust it as necessary. Take in a little more at some seam allowances, and take in a little less at others.
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Unread 06-04-2018, 10:51 AM   #6
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I want to thanks everybody for their help. I've been told by someone else to add ease to the pattern, something I didn't think I needed to do as it is a fitted bodice. That seemed to help fix the problem. On both this and the previous bodices I tried it on myself as well as the dress form, but this version actually closes up on me.


Last edited by Yikes! : 06-04-2018 at 10:52 AM. Reason: Photo
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Unread 07-01-2018, 03:58 PM   #7
NykkiJo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yikes! View Post
I've been told by someone else to add ease to the pattern, something I didn't think I needed to do as it is a fitted bodice.
Pretty much anything woven needs some ease. There's a difference between style ease and fit ease. Style ease will make it look loose and comfy (like loose jeans). Fit ease is the little bit of ease necessary to move your arms and sit down while wearing it. Making a cheap prototype out of a similar material (same weave or knit, same amount of stretch, etc) is important for understanding how much ease is needed.

You take a little out of the garment when you sew, too, so make sure you have the right seam allowance. Either see how much seam allowance your pattern dictates or add it to your own pattern. If you sew at 5/8" (typical for domestic sewing machines), add 5/8" along all the edges that'll be sewn.

Last edited by NykkiJo : 07-01-2018 at 04:00 PM.
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