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Unread 02-20-2007, 10:31 PM   #1
Camion
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White... room?

Please excuse my ignorance regarding photography..

I've seen some cosplayers use photo studios with completely white backgrounds - white walls/backdrops and floors, so you can't see where the wall ends and the floor starts - it just looks completely white... do these studios have a name? I've been trying to search for one in this area with little luck.
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Unread 02-20-2007, 11:06 PM   #2
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It's not so much a studio than just the correct background. You can buy large, wide rolls of paper for this purpose. By keeping a gentle curve in the paper as it goes from laying on the floor to hanging from the wall, you avoid harsh shadows that give away creases. Of course, the right lighting helps, and should be pretty soft, but it can be done fairly easily.
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Unread 02-20-2007, 11:52 PM   #3
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What you're looking for is called an infinity cove. Most studios should be able to set one up if they don't have one set up already.
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Unread 02-21-2007, 12:11 AM   #4
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It' fairly easy to set one up. Ebay even has whole kits for this. Search for backgrounds in the photo section. Good luck!

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Unread 02-21-2007, 01:31 AM   #5
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Thank you so much for all your help^^
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Unread 02-21-2007, 07:25 AM   #6
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I used a high key backdrop at AB06 for my staff work.. is this what you mean?

http://images.cosplay.com/gallery.ph...96&member=4024

Doing work like this is actually more than just flipping a backdrop out behind the people.

It starts out as Ollie states. Whether you use a muslin backdrop or paper is kind of irrelevant.

In the images in that gallery of mine, I used muslin. I chose muslin because it is far mroe transportable. Since I was doing staff work at a convention, I had to transport a studio to the convention.

You need a fairly LARGE backdrop to start with. Once up you need it to be completely free of wrinkles. Both in the backdrop, and the floor underneath the cosplayers. This means you spend a significant amount of time getting wrinkles out. Probably for every minute shooting you have 3 removing wrinkles and folds in the muslin. I also bring a professional steamer with me to aid in keeping the backdrop wrinkle free.

The reason the backdrop needs to be wrinkle free, is because lights that cast across the backdrop wil create VERY obvious shadows over any wrinkles and will ruin the effect.

NEXT, you need at the VERY LEAST, one backdrop light to overexpose the backdrop. Set this light to 2 stops over your key light's reading on your subject.

Your subjects need to also be moved forward from the backdrop, 6-8 feet MINIMUM. This removes any potential shadows from your main light, as well as any potential light spill from your backdrop light(s).

Your main light needs to be diffused properly, and you may choose to use a reflector or a fill light to grab the shadows on the off side of the cosplayer.


That backdrop was 24ftx10ft. I would say it had about 10 feet up, and 14 feet on the ground. It accomidated 4 cosplayers comfortably. Anything over that was beginning to crowd the backdrop.

Set your camera to your meter your main light.

Ensure you have PLENTY of room for this sort of thing. And expect to photoshop areas of wrinkles that you missed. The more work you do before you snap the shutter, the less work you have to do after you're done. So be a stickler for details.

Feel free to ask any questions.

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Unread 02-21-2007, 01:07 PM   #7
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You could also probably do it where there is a seam between wall and floor if you light it up well and are prepared to do some photoshopping afterwards
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Last edited by Av4rice : 02-21-2007 at 01:12 PM.
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Unread 02-22-2007, 12:00 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staereo
In the images in that gallery of mine, I used muslin. I chose muslin because it is far mroe transportable. Since I was doing staff work at a convention, I had to transport a studio to the convention.
In my first experience shooting studio, it was a high school dance. I used a blue-wash coloured muslin backdrop and I vote for Muslins all the way!! They are nice, and definitely easy to travel with.

I used a 10'x24' and did not use a light for the background because I wanted the people to pop out of a dark, soft background. Even on the coloured and dark background, there was hardly any creases visible (almost none really), so I imagine the white to be just as easy to keep crease-free. (Having the right light probably adds ease too.)

I really want to get the ever-popular high key white portrait! :3
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Unread 02-22-2007, 07:04 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Sipo View Post
Even on the coloured and dark background, there was hardly any creases visible (almost none really), so I imagine the white to be just as easy to keep crease-free. (Having the right light probably adds ease too.)
Yes and no... The lighter your color, approaching and inclusive of white, the more obvious shadows are when they play upon it. The contrast ratio between a shadow cast on the material; and the material itself grows much faster than that of a shadow lay upon a already darker colored backdrop.

It is very hard keeping it crease free. Whats worse is when you're going for a high key portrait, you have to blow out the backdrop with a strobe. Because you can't put a straight on backdrop light against it, you end up needing to put SOME sort of an angle on your light, and that angle tends to be rather sharp unless you have a very involved lighting setup involving cutters and flags.

When you have light that cuts across the lens' direction, side to side, it adds heavy texture values to whatever you are shooting. (Shine a flashlight on a piece of cloth straight on, then rest the flashlight against the cloth and shine it along the cloth side to side to see this effect easier) So when you use a backdrop light from an angle, you accentuate those creases and waves by casting much more apparent shadows from the light.

High key is easiest when done in a studio that has a high key, white, molded set. No running after creases and wrinkles.

Another great thing to do is get a thin piece of plexiglass and lay it down where the subject will be standing. This gives that white reflective surface look to the image, and does leaps and bounds towards keeping your muslin flat and wrinkle free.



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Unread 02-23-2007, 01:09 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staereo
Yes and no... The lighter your color, approaching and inclusive of white, the more obvious shadows are when they play upon it. The contrast ratio between a shadow cast on the material; and the material itself grows much faster than that of a shadow lay upon a already darker colored backdrop.

It is very hard keeping it crease free. Whats worse is when you're going for a high key portrait, you have to blow out the backdrop with a strobe. Because you can't put a straight on backdrop light against it, you end up needing to put SOME sort of an angle on your light, and that angle tends to be rather sharp unless you have a very involved lighting setup involving cutters and flags.

When you have light that cuts across the lens' direction, side to side, it adds heavy texture values to whatever you are shooting. (Shine a flashlight on a piece of cloth straight on, then rest the flashlight against the cloth and shine it along the cloth side to side to see this effect easier) So when you use a backdrop light from an angle, you accentuate those creases and waves by casting much more apparent shadows from the light.

High key is easiest when done in a studio that has a high key, white, molded set. No running after creases and wrinkles.

Another great thing to do is get a thin piece of plexiglass and lay it down where the subject will be standing. This gives that white reflective surface look to the image, and does leaps and bounds towards keeping your muslin flat and wrinkle free.
Ahhh such good info. thanks a ton! I am just getting into shooting studio recently, so the more knowledge/tips the better.

The information I get here is priceless! Thank you.
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Unread 02-23-2007, 06:42 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Sipo View Post
Ahhh such good info. thanks a ton! I am just getting into shooting studio recently, so the more knowledge/tips the better.

The information I get here is priceless! Thank you.
Someone taught me much of what I know. I'm just passing it on. Happy to help!

Feel free to poke at me if theres anything else I can help with!
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Unread 02-24-2007, 03:27 AM   #12
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Thank you fro all the info!

staereo - Yup, like that. You got it done really well! I don't know much about photography and such but I'll keep what you said in mind if I ever decide to try it. Thank you for all the great tips.
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