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Unread 08-08-2007, 09:29 PM   #1
Paper_Alchemist
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FMA Gluttony Mask!!!!!

Made a mask from Laytex in the image of Gluttony. Here is the link http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/61803603/

I need to make the laytex thicker but other than that, what can do to make the structure of the mask pop out to its original form? Thanks I appreciate all the help I can get.
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Tekkoshocon 6 2008 cosplay

Friday: Gluttony (FMA)
http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/53388492/
thats version 1 version 2.0 to come

Saturday: Major (Hellsing)

Sunday: ?????
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Unread 08-08-2007, 10:21 PM   #2
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the thickness of the latex doesn't look too bad. A bit of the structure is too hard to see until you paint it, but it looks like a fine effort.

The quick answer is cotton or polyester batting, and lots of it. Unfortunately, that has the side affect of making you look like you have a rubber pillow on your head.

You can craft a supporting head from furniture foam, or even styrofoam. It solves the dumpyness issue of loose batting, and it gives you a hollow cavity in which you could circulate air if needed. Unfortunately, both take quite a bit of skill, and the styrofoam on it's own is fragile. This is sort of the technique used for making mascot suits/masks.

Another alternative might be to try and retrofit the mold with a lifecast in the center, to create a custom prosthetic mask out of foam latex, but switching after the fact is pretty easy to mess up, and that much foam would be pretty costly.

If your mold is two-part (oh I hope it is), you can potentially follow the latex up with a rigid material, like polyurethane resins or fiberglass. If you do this, you'll want to take a serious look at safety issues. Many of those materials are downright toxic and not permitted for use in food storage, so you wouldn't want to surround your face with the stuff.

but in all honesty, I reccomend asking this question at http://www.theeffectslab.com, explain that you are new to the hobby, and maybe give them a reference photo of the character as they probably aren't familiar with FMA like most of us.

Pictures of the mold and or sculpt would also be nice. In fact, I'd love to see them posted on this thread.
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Unread 08-08-2007, 11:46 PM   #3
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http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/59814243/

heres the original. I also need to know what kind of paint to use to paint the mask. I have had some luck with acrylic so far. thanks Verdatum, for the advice and all. Your a true Pro!
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Theres the Full Metal Alchemist, The Flame Alchemist,I am the Alchemist......of paper?

Tekkoshocon 6 2008 cosplay

Friday: Gluttony (FMA)
http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/53388492/
thats version 1 version 2.0 to come

Saturday: Major (Hellsing)

Sunday: ?????
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Unread 08-09-2007, 01:41 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paper_Alchemist View Post
Awesome. Hehe, I see from your page that you're a fellow nerf modder. Nice.
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Originally Posted by Paper_Alchemist View Post
I also need to know what kind of paint to use to paint the mask. I have had some luck with acrylic so far.
I haven't done much latex painting beyond buildup appliances where you are forced to use makeup for safety reasons. In mask painting, you have the freedom to use more dangerous products.

From what I've read, rubber cement based paints are popular for painting latex masks. So it's a combination of oil based paint (The expensive stuff in the little tubes in the art section of craft stores), rubber cement, and naptha. These are super nasty chemicals, so painting needs to be done in an open area (like outside or in an open garage) and a respirator should be worn. I'm told acrylic paint or FW inks can be used in place of oil, but again, I have no experience to describe the performance differences.

If you want something less evil, you can basecoat the mask with PAX (which is just a term meaning you mix 50% liquitex artist acrylic and 50% pros-aide prosthetic adhesive) and successive coats in straight acrylic. It will not meld into the mask the way the rubber cement will, and it will be a tiny bit more fragile, but it should allow the paint to be flexible enough to work. Just don't stress it.

If too lazy to get ahold of pros-aide (it's quite a specialty product, you'll only ever see it online), then straight acrylic paint works, it's just a bit fragile. Let the mask dry for at least 24 hours before flexing any painted surface.

Airbrushing is reccomended. If anything, it eases the frustration of clogging up brushes with the rubber cement. The rubber cement paint is thinned with naptha (other solvents also work, but do tests), the PAX/acrylic can be thinned with denatured alcohol. I thin my paint to the consistency of whole milk. Some do more, some do less, but this is the most common reccomendation I see. Use a cheap external mix, single action airbrush. Clogging a quality airbrush with this sort of paint will make you cry. The PAX especially.

I THINK I've read that you can actually use straight oil paints. Oil paints are linseed based, so they won't deteriorate the latex the way petroleum based oils will do. It's supposed to look pretty good, but takes a couple weeks for the oil to absorb into the latex.


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thanks Verdatum, for the advice and all. Your a true Pro!
Nah, I'm just a hobbyist. Pros do this to survive -- and often end up nearly starving in the process. I gots to respect that kind of courage while I sit at my comfy deskjob that lets me afford all this goofy junk.

But thanks, always happy to help with what i can
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Unread 08-10-2007, 05:15 PM   #5
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K, I got some new info about latex mask painting since my last post. Read this thread, it has some very important stuff:
http://www.theeffectslab.com/forums/...690e3 cea9319
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Unread 08-11-2007, 01:50 AM   #6
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You can reinforce the mask by foam filling a bit of it while its still in the mold,then afterward you can cut out what you dont need.Also,when i paint a latex mask,i use a 50/50 mix of liquid latex and acrylic paint,then thin it with windex till its about as thin as milk.Also,where did you get your latex?I reccomend Monster Makers,although there latex is expensive,its very worth it,it builds up nicely in the molds so your left with a thick copy of your mask.
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