Go Back   Cosplay.com > Cosplay Construction > Props/Accessories/Armor

Reply
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 4 votes, 5.00 average.
Unread 11-09-2008, 05:03 PM   #1
djkaneda
Polygon Wizard
 
djkaneda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 174
Papercraft: Helping you make props, one pattern at a time

I'm beginning to notice that papercraft is starting to leak into this hobby a little more for armor/prop creation. It is something that myself, and a few friends have been using for some time now (though I am usually the one doing the 3d work)

3d is what I do for a living, so what I want to know from you, coscom, is if you all think that you would use papercraft patterns to help you create props, and possibly armor.
Would premade, pre-scaled prop/armor patterns be something that you would be interested in?

This could potentially give people that do not necessarily have the skill to create armor and props from scratch the ability to make their own stuff. As all they would have to do would be to take these patterns and use them to assemble props out of cardboard, styrene, or whatever they wish.

I ask because I am considering starting to take commisions for papercraft patterns, and sort of just want to see if there would even be any interest, before I commit to it.



some examples of what can be done with these patterns

4ng31's daft punk helmet

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1592583/


4ng31's halo armor (patterns from the 405th)

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1327075/
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1327038/

My Combine metrocop mask

http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1676868/
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/1659085/




and some examples of 3d patterns that I have created, that have not yet been fully created in real life yet

gears of war armor and lancer
http://www.cgjeff.com/cos/gow/25.jpg

Chakrams
http://www.cgjeff.com/cos/_c/asuka/01.jpg


Keyblades

http://www.cgjeff.com/cos/_c/quicksilver/k/1.jpg
http://www.cgjeff.com/cos/_c/quicksilver/oath/03.jpg
http://www.cgjeff.com/cos/_c/quicksilver/obliv/02.jpg

FFXII Judge armors for myself and 4ng31
http://www.cgjeff.com/cos/jg/zb.jpg





So give me your opinions. Would you commission someone to create custom patterns for you so that you could create your own armor/props?
djkaneda is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Unread 11-10-2008, 09:45 AM   #2
Marsupial
Registered User
 
Marsupial's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7
Depending on complexity, accuracy and pricing, that could be something to think of.

However, I am uncertain about the method using paper patterns - I've seem peparuka props where they make the 3D thin cardboard prop, then lay some fiberglass inside.
I'd be more into making it straight from sheet plastic, glued and pottied together to a finalized solid piece. I believe the same method of 3D modeling would be usable for this, but would require to take into consideration the added thickness of the material.
__________________
-Mars
Marsupial is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-10-2008, 03:21 PM   #3
CreepyUncleLee
CreepyUncleLee
 
CreepyUncleLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 355
I find papercraft to be like a pre shapeing base for some costumes.
I was thinking of useing printed out papercrafts and useing them to shape out things like wonderflex out correctly to get a correct dead on shape.
I do believe that papercraft is the next big thing in cosplay, especially with armor, robot, and mecha type costumes like halo and general robot stuff.

Are there any sites full of pdf's of papercraft?i'd love to make a canti head for my small tv


http://zip.4chan.org/po/src/1226168884771.pdf

i'm making this for a friend thats coming back from the marines some time soon as a welcome back from boot camp hell,you know for display or w/e

its technically the first papercraft i'll be useing for cosplay and not for fun,so i've yet to finish,but i plan on back it with things like posterboard and foam core so i can get a basic shape of the gun then covering it in resin,etc.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Next cosplays:
HulkBuster IronMan suit
Green Lantern Optimus Prime with guitar
Green Lantern Space Marine
Reptar from Rugrats
Samurai Appa from avatar dream
Blastoise Gijinka

Last edited by CreepyUncleLee : 11-10-2008 at 03:36 PM.
CreepyUncleLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-10-2008, 06:44 PM   #4
djkaneda
Polygon Wizard
 
djkaneda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marsupial View Post
Depending on complexity, accuracy and pricing, that could be something to think of.

However, I am uncertain about the method using paper patterns - I've seem peparuka props where they make the 3D thin cardboard prop, then lay some fiberglass inside.
I'd be more into making it straight from sheet plastic, glued and pottied together to a finalized solid piece. I believe the same method of 3D modeling would be usable for this, but would require to take into consideration the added thickness of the material.
this is relatively similar to the methods that I already use. The chipboard (non corrugated cardboard) that I use is about 1.5mm thick, which is not much thinner than most styrene sheets. So I am quite used to modeling things with the intention of using a thicker material in the end.
djkaneda is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-11-2008, 01:27 PM   #5
Juego
Do you want a 2nd opinion
 
Juego's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 425
Sounds awesome, man. I'm utter crap in a 3D program and I've got some intricate props coming up where it will save me tons of time to have a pre-done model rather than me sitting and measuring everything by hand.
__________________
ZOMG I'm alive! 2012: PariahCon | MegaCon | Dragon*Con
Juego is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-12-2008, 10:39 PM   #6
Ikariya
Silver Robot Specialist
 
Ikariya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 158
djkaneda - I found a site where a guy was making patterns for people so they could print out and make their own papercraft props. He only made the patterns and sold the data to people like your idea: http://skipspepakuracostumes.blogspot.com

Not sure how much he charged and whatnot. I've begun to use maya to construct models for papercraft just recently too. (see my Frenzy robot) It's the perfect way to get the most functionaly perfect models out there.

Personaly, I think that if you can make an easy to build model of that FF 13 transforming gunblade thing Lightning has, you can probably sell the pattern to a bunch of fans. Helmet patterns however are simple and easy to produce.
__________________

Accurate Vocaloid Magnet headphone cups from my Shapeways shop
A Heaven Coin from Panty and Stocking which you can hold!
Ikariya is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-13-2008, 10:43 AM   #7
Marsupial
Registered User
 
Marsupial's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by djkaneda View Post
this is relatively similar to the methods that I already use. The chipboard (non corrugated cardboard) that I use is about 1.5mm thick, which is not much thinner than most styrene sheets. So I am quite used to modeling things with the intention of using a thicker material in the end.
Well, that could be interesting.

I've been looking at the "pattern" for a mandalorian helmet available at The Dented Helmet (Fett/mandalorian reference forum) and always tought something could be made out from that to achieve a plastic one.

see this article on Instructables:

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-...ostume-helmet/

There IS something of interests here...
__________________
-Mars
Marsupial is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-13-2008, 11:31 AM   #8
Ditto
甘瓜
 
Ditto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 285
How would one build this after they have the 3D model? If it's not to hard or pricey then I would be interested as one of my friends needs a suit of armor for next year that I am helping him with.
__________________

[3D Photography - Ditto3D]
[Commissions - Gravity Props]
none
Ditto is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-13-2008, 11:47 AM   #9
DesertLily
ಠ_ಠ
 
DesertLily's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 245
I'd definitely be willing to pay for a papercraft pattern. I just started using paperclay and found that it's incredibly usefual having a paper/cardboard base and simply covering over it, but unfortunately I'm terrible at figuring out just exactly how to put stuff together. This would certainly help.
__________________
Currently working on:
Elfaria (Odin Sphere)
Angela (Seiken Densetsu 3)
Sara Nome (Macross Zero)
Planned:
Shark Fujishiro (Seto no Hanayome)
Alto-Saotome - kabuki attire (Macross Frontier)
DesertLily is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-13-2008, 01:45 PM   #10
4ng31
meh.
 
4ng31's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ikariya View Post
Helmet patterns however are simple and easy to produce.
I don't know which helmets you're building, but the most challenging, and time intensive part of the costumes I have both done, and are doing, is always the helmet...so to say they are "simple and easy" is...well, IMO, wrong.

Helmets are always the part of a costume that get slaughtered...see Megaman cosplay among many, many others.

Dunno, I think you just missed the mark with that statement. :/
__________________
4ng31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-14-2008, 01:40 AM   #11
Ikariya
Silver Robot Specialist
 
Ikariya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 158
I agree with you that megaman gets slaughtered pretty badly. I suppose I did exaggerate a bit huh! I mean to say that figuring out a pattern for a helmet is so much better on a computer than with raw pieces. The 405th papercraft helms got lots of people following their patterns.
__________________

Accurate Vocaloid Magnet headphone cups from my Shapeways shop
A Heaven Coin from Panty and Stocking which you can hold!
Ikariya is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-15-2008, 05:30 PM   #12
Beryl
I did it all for you
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 645
Check out Backyard FX's Halo Armor. It is done with the Pepakura method, and it's basically a video tutorial, though some of the gaps are left out, especially the parts about using bondo to smooth out the shapes at the end.

To summarize the method, it involves printing out the pepakura patterns on cardstock. You will then be folding/gluing them to shape. After that, it's a coat of Aqua Resin (less putzy than some other types of resin, apparently) on the inside and the outside. Then a layer of fiberglass on the inside (use tiny pieces!). Then, if you want, you can use putty/bondo to smooth/round out the shapes, paint it, add straps/padding... after that, you just need to look ridiculously awesome.

Complicated pepakura is difficult to do (curves, especially - Halo Armor will take you a long, long time) but if you can manage it, the results can be outstanding.
__________________
Be considerate: Use the Search Button before posting a question.
Not sure how to make a prop? Check The Prop Tutorial List, too!

And always remember to follow this handy guide when posting.
Beryl is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-15-2008, 07:42 PM   #13
4ng31
meh.
 
4ng31's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beryl View Post
Check out Backyard FX's Halo Armor. It is done with the Pepakura method, and it's basically a video tutorial, though some of the gaps are left out, especially the parts about using bondo to smooth out the shapes at the end.

To summarize the method, it involves printing out the pepakura patterns on cardstock. You will then be folding/gluing them to shape. After that, it's a coat of Aqua Resin (less putzy than some other types of resin, apparently) on the inside and the outside. Then a layer of fiberglass on the inside (use tiny pieces!). Then, if you want, you can use putty/bondo to smooth/round out the shapes, paint it, add straps/padding... after that, you just need to look ridiculously awesome.

Complicated pepakura is difficult to do (curves, especially - Halo Armor will take you a long, long time) but if you can manage it, the results can be outstanding.
This video is shit.

So much bad/incorrect information...

1) You should always, ALWAYS fiberglass the exterior. The reason you use Bondo "body filler", key word, filler, is to smooth out a surface...not to "sculpt"...they make clay for that.

2) Size is irrelevant to proper fiberglass application...it should be more so about proper "fitting" pieces...ergo, cut you mat to the shape of the object...not "jam a bunch of little pieces in there".

3) I also found it amusing how the whole "scale it to your body" thing was mentioned...if you wanna look like a wet rat wearing armor...go for it. Something like Spartan armor needs to be bulky, and can be compensated with a large undersuit and/or foam padding. Also...her armor is VERY overscaled...so...irony...

4) Do not buy a generic underarmor suit...pretty sure the chief doesn't wear bike pads under the suit...matter of fact...he doesn't wear ANY under armor.

Lastly, I find it amusing they chose Skull to do this video, when most of that armor was done by other people for her...irony again.

Sorry for the raeg...but that is not a video people should be following. Aqua resin is trash...you want real hard armor, stick to liquid plastics and polyester resin...not water based crap.
__________________
4ng31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-15-2008, 10:01 PM   #14
djkaneda
Polygon Wizard
 
djkaneda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ng31 View Post
This video is shit.

So much bad/incorrect information...

1) You should always, ALWAYS fiberglass the exterior. The reason you use Bondo "body filler", key word, filler, is to smooth out a surface...not to "sculpt"...they make clay for that.

2) Size is irrelevant to proper fiberglass application...it should be more so about proper "fitting" pieces...ergo, cut you mat to the shape of the object...not "jam a bunch of little pieces in there".

3) I also found it amusing how the whole "scale it to your body" thing was mentioned...if you wanna look like a wet rat wearing armor...go for it. Something like Spartan armor needs to be bulky, and can be compensated with a large undersuit and/or foam padding. Also...her armor is VERY overscaled...so...irony...

4) Do not buy a generic underarmor suit...pretty sure the chief doesn't wear bike pads under the suit...matter of fact...he doesn't wear ANY under armor.

Lastly, I find it amusing they chose Skull to do this video, when most of that armor was done by other people for her...irony again.

Sorry for the raeg...but that is not a video people should be following. Aqua resin is trash...you want real hard armor, stick to liquid plastics and polyester resin...not water based crap.

yea pretty much this. I have tried aquaresin myself. it's basically a gypsum based product. just like plaster, and just like plaster it's brittle and not worth a damn for costuming. Great for statues, great for sculpture replication. NOT FOR COSTUMING.

If you have trouble with fiberglassing the outside of a piece, buy thinner fiberglass. Most people that work with the stuff in this hobby don't realize it (because they buy their stuff from walmart and hardware stores) but you can buy a damn good variation of thicknesses of fiberglass cloth/mat. If you have trouble finding the stuff, find it online, or find a store near you that does boat repair, they can help you. I personally work a mat that is much thinner than what you buy at hardware stores, because I like the way it handles tight areas and curves much better.

I also HIGHLY DON'T recommend using cardstock for building papercraft armor/props. There is a reason that a lot of the armor being made on places like the 405th ends up warped and misshapen when they get around to fiberglassing it. Glassing a cardstock piece takes a great deal more skill and preperation than say cardboard, or styrene.

What I recommend to anyone I make patterns for is this
http://www.dickblick.com/zz131/15/

It is what I personally use. I recommend it. Chipboard has much less of a chance of warping before fiberglassing. It holds shape incredibly well. can be sanded and carved to a relative smoothness before fiberglassing, which saves an immense deal of sanding time later on.
And best of all it is incredibly cheap. You can buy enough chipboard to do a full suit of armor for around 10 dollars.


he is also right about that girl's armor, the majority of her armor was donated to her by various people on the 405th who do not use papercraft to make their armor. And is also why most of her armor does not fit her properly. She personally has not made a lot of pieces herself, and in that video is basically just parroting what a lot of the kids over on the 405th say. Which, unfortunately, the majority of the papercraft part of that forum is nothing but misinformation.

Last edited by djkaneda : 11-15-2008 at 10:31 PM.
djkaneda is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-17-2008, 12:35 PM   #15
Marsupial
Registered User
 
Marsupial's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by djkaneda View Post
I also HIGHLY DON'T recommend using cardstock for building papercraft armor/props. There is a reason that a lot of the armor being made on places like the 405th ends up warped and misshapen when they get around to fiberglassing it. Glassing a cardstock piece takes a great deal more skill and preperation than say cardboard, or styrene.
I get that using styrene is a good idea??

how'd you recommend reinforcing it?
__________________
-Mars
Marsupial is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:35 AM.


Copyright 2002-2013 Cosplay.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
All comments and posts in our forums are the opinion of the respective poster.