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Unread 10-03-2011, 03:48 PM   #346
Eurobeat King
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Originally Posted by firecloak View Post
Is it okay to ask for the full resolution image for certain picture(s)? Will you guys give the full resolution image to that cosplayer if they ask?
I have cosplayers who ask me for full-size pictures that I took of them at a con, and I don't mind emailing them the pictures as-long as they credit me for taking the pictures.

For some of my friends, I copy most (if not all) of the pictures I took of them during the con and give it to them on CD-R on the last day. I rarely shoot RAW so the images are JPG format, and I let them have the pictures so that they may post them, and also work on the pictures with photo-shop (I use very little to none when I post my pictures) which they send back to me to post, and also let them choose which pictures they want posted and which ones they don't.

Anyone who asks me for pictures knows to credit me. I've never had anyone ask me to email them pictures and never once not credit me for taking the pictures. Giving credit where it's due is all I ask.

The main reason why I give people full-size pictures is that it strengthens the trust/bond between cosplayer & photographer. Providing full-size pictures promptly, allowing the cosplayer to decide which pictures to post and which ones not to post, and letting them touch-up the pictures they like, is a good system that hopefully means the cosplayer(s) will pose for me again next time I see them at a convention.
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Unread 10-03-2011, 07:10 PM   #347
Access
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Originally Posted by Eurobeat King View Post
The main reason why I give people full-size pictures is that it strengthens the trust/bond between cosplayer & photographer. Providing full-size pictures promptly, allowing the cosplayer to decide which pictures to post and which ones not to post, and letting them touch-up the pictures they like, is a good system that hopefully means the cosplayer(s) will pose for me again next time I see them at a convention.
The other thing is that a lot of times, people have their own view about the pics they want to see or the ones they consider best. Sometimes it's the odd candid pic that looks totally goofy or something / someone in the background or something that just never occurred to me.

This is my view too, but maybe it just comes down to that a lot more is shared between friends or just people who know each other than between strangers. I know a few people who are far better with photoshop than I am, and if they want to do their own post then fine; it's really just about turning out the best picture. Something that is a team effort from the very beginning.
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Unread 10-04-2011, 03:12 AM   #348
Ashurachan
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Originally Posted by Access View Post
The other thing is that a lot of times, people have their own view about the pics they want to see or the ones they consider best. Sometimes it's the odd candid pic that looks totally goofy or something / someone in the background or something that just never occurred to me.
On the other hand, if you know cosplayers, you end up knowing the kind of pictures they like, and choose which to post process accordingly. My personal rule is to process at least one photo per pose (even if I'm not absolutely satisfied with it).
I never, ever give out unprocessed pictures. When someone asks me "could I have all the pictures" (it's quite often the case for the studio shoots Objectif Costumes does during Japan Expo), I reply "no, you can't" and explain that if the other pictures did not make it to the selection, it's because the photographer deemed them not good enough to post-process. Processing studio shoots is long enough like this...
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Unread 10-04-2011, 10:23 AM   #349
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I have a question regarding natural lighting in a convention center as being your subject light. I've been attempting to try this on my off time and can't seem to get it right.

Sunlight behind makes the model's face too shadowed and sunlight from behind me onto them is too harsh. I see photographers get beautiful warm shots with no flash but I must be doing something wrong?
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Unread 10-04-2011, 11:11 AM   #350
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petite <3 View Post
I have a question regarding natural lighting in a convention center as being your subject light. I've been attempting to try this on my off time and can't seem to get it right.

Sunlight behind makes the model's face too shadowed and sunlight from behind me onto them is too harsh. I see photographers get beautiful warm shots with no flash but I must be doing something wrong?
There are books on the art of shooting in natural light so it’s quite a subject to cover.
However, there are some basic techniques that might help get you going in the right direction. Time is your biggest obstacle when shooting at a convention. Time of day and time for shooting are two that you’ll have to juggle to get the best from natural lighting. If you have the luxury of shooting during the “golden hours” of morning and evening than it’s a matter of angling your subject so the warm light falls in the right places. If you’re like most photogs and have to work with the harsh midday sun then you get creative. Find a shady area to shoot and use some fill-flash or if you have an assistant/stand use a reflector. If you have to shoot in full-day sun then have the sun on your subjects back and crank-up your flash to light-up the face and body. Try to avoid flare by using a lens hood. Also, if your camera has an exposure button you can adjust the exposure to your liking. If it’s really intense consider using a neutral density filter to cut-down the light a few stops. Don’t use any flash modifiers outside since you’re competing with the sun and you need all the power your flash can give you.

Now, there are many other techniques and ways to shoot in sunlight and I’m sure others can share their knowledge but the above works for me when I’m roving around with a single flash on my camera.
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Unread 10-04-2011, 11:15 AM   #351
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petite <3 View Post
I have a question regarding natural lighting in a convention center as being your subject light. I've been attempting to try this on my off time and can't seem to get it right.

Sunlight behind makes the model's face too shadowed and sunlight from behind me onto them is too harsh. I see photographers get beautiful warm shots with no flash but I must be doing something wrong?
What convention center are you talking about? LACC? ACC?
No matter what, you need to explore and find the areas that look good at certain times during the day. In general look for shade and indirect lighting, out of the way places with not a lot of people around, and use postprocessing like highlight and shadow correction to bring the lighting back into the range you want it to be in (if it is too bright or dark).
ie. for the LACC -- this out-of-the-way area if it makes sense for the character
http://phoenixspine.deviantart.com/g...et=24#/d2v0sus
or the outside part of the west hall, around the stairs and the patterned windows
http://www.cosplay.com/photo/2621515/
not the best photo, but that's the area at least...

Every venue has areas like this, you just need to find them, and the 'good' places can shift or move as the time of day and season changes also. Avoid the two extremes you described (sun directly behind you or sun directly behind the subject), as well as direct overhead sunlight, use the basic portrait angles 30 or 45 degrees if the sun is lower in the sky, but avoid direct sunlight in general (too harsh).

Last edited by Access : 10-04-2011 at 11:18 AM.
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Unread 10-04-2011, 12:05 PM   #352
Eriol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petite <3 View Post
I have a question regarding natural lighting in a convention center as being your subject light. I've been attempting to try this on my off time and can't seem to get it right.

Sunlight behind makes the model's face too shadowed and sunlight from behind me onto them is too harsh. I see photographers get beautiful warm shots with no flash but I must be doing something wrong?
Available sunlight changes throughout the day. As others have noted, the available light at one spot of a con may be good at one time but not good at a different time. It is something you have to observe and takes practice.

Surfsama noted that some photographers at the con use reflectors to get the available light they need, but that requires an assistant. Some of the warm shot you see were probably done with reflectors.

Here are some references to help you try to 'see' available light. Although these are wedding-oriented, the ability to see available light applies to cosplay as well. (none use reflectors)
http://neilvn.com/tangents/2010/10/0...ailable-light/
http://neilvn.com/tangents/2010/11/0...ailable-light/
http://neilvn.com/tangents/2011/02/0...vs-fill-flash/
http://neilvn.com/tangents/2011/02/1...ailable-light/
http://neilvn.com/tangents/2011/07/2...is-not-random/
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Unread 10-04-2011, 12:54 PM   #353
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as for getting those sorts of shots with the harsh backlighting of the sun, theyre probably using a reflector, or doing some HDR work, or they are using flash and you just dont know it . . . Cons I go to are hit or miss, some are pretty well sheltered from sunlight (heavy urban areas, shade from neighboring skyscrapers, and just minimal amounts of windows), some where large windows dominate most of the main floor, and some that just invite me to shoot outside. . . whatever the case, I use flash(es)... in situations you list I try to expose for the image outside the window to keep it nice and undistracting, and let the flash light the subject as best I can (how I do that varies by situation). . . when I go outside and deal with direct sunlight and shade it starts geting into some problems, the other day the shutter speeds were so high I needed 2 bare bulb speedlights on my model to get a decent amount of fill light in
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Unread 10-10-2011, 06:37 AM   #354
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ok. im still scared shitless of photographers but im more educated when it comes to etiquette and what not so thank you again for all your responses. What my question is now...

would you find it rude if a cosplayer who didn't know ask you to take their picture base on how you interacted with a previous cosplayer at random? (And this is obviously if you had space or your camera or was willing to give the time)

also what does a basic model release form involved? Is it necessary for a impromptu picture(s)? Is it always necessary?
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Unread 10-10-2011, 09:12 AM   #355
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- I have no problems with people asking me if I can take a picture of them, as long as they ask politely and don't expect me to do a whole big photoshoot.

- model releases are a form of contract between photographer and cosplayer. By signing it, the model agrees that the photos may be used in a way or another by the photographer - how it can be used will be specified on the release. The release also specifies whether the model has specific rights over the pictures.
It is in no way necessary, but it clears up the intent of the photographer and more or less marks said photographer as a serious professionnal. When there is no model release, photographers have default rights over the photo, which depend on the countries (French law for example does not allow publishing or public displaying of photos of individual people without their consent).

Last edited by Ashurachan : 10-11-2011 at 03:24 AM.
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Unread 10-10-2011, 10:27 AM   #356
Eriol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gemmy_Juneko View Post
would you find it rude if a cosplayer who didn't know ask you to take their picture base on how you interacted with a previous cosplayer at random? (And this is obviously if you had space or your camera or was willing to give the time)
Provided I had the time, that is not a rude request at all. That is probably a compliment for cosplay photographers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gemmy_Juneko
also what does a basic model release form involved? Is it necessary for a impromptu picture(s)? Is it always necessary?
A model release basically describes what the photographer is allowed to do with the photographs taken. It often describes how the photograph may be published, manipulated, and in what context they can be used. If the photographer intends to sell the photos or thinks the photos may be published in a magazine, book, etc., it is good to get a model release.

Some model releases may also have a usage rights clause, which tells what the model can do with the photos.

The model release greatly reduces the confusion between the photographer and cosplayer as to how the photos will be used. If you are presented with a model release, you should read the release carefully, as there is no one-size-fits-all release. Don't sign anything you are not comfortable with.

In the case of cosplay photography, since the character designs are copyrighted, selling the photos is not likely at all. However, if an editor for an anime or cosplay magazine wanted to use a photograph to publish in a magazine, a model release is often required. Cosplay photography books, like Cosplay in America, may also require model releases.


Is it necessary for convention photography or impromptu pictures? No.
Is it always necessary? No. If it's convention photography and there is no model release, the general default agreement is "don't sell or manipulate photos" for either party. If a newspaper is reporting on a convention, they won't need a model release generally (i.e. they are reporting the news).
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Unread 10-12-2011, 11:33 AM   #357
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Quote:
ok. im still scared shitless of photographers but im more educated when it comes to etiquette and what not so thank you again for all your responses. What my question is now...

would you find it rude if a cosplayer who didn't know ask you to take their picture base on how you interacted with a previous cosplayer at random? (And this is obviously if you had space or your camera or was willing to give the time)
Aw, you don't have to be scared of us. Just because we're carrying lots of equipment or fancy gear doesn't make us any less of a fellow geek/fangirl/fanboy!

As for requesing a shot - I wouldn't find it rude at all! Most cons I attend I'm shooting for a media group, so it's part of my job. It's excellent to meet new people! However, if I'm in the middle of a private shoot or on the way to another engagement, I would offer to shoot at a more convenient time.

Sometimes it can help to talk to a photographer ahead of time. Many photographers post their availability on upcoming convention forums. If you like a particular person's work, try chatting with them and see if you would like to arrange for some photos.

Hope that helps!
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Unread 10-21-2011, 03:11 PM   #358
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I've posted a new thread topic on General Cosplay chat and also posted the question on 'Ask a Cosplayer' but I also wanted to address the issue/question to photographers as well since it involves both parties. =)

So basically my question is this:

Is it okay for a photographer/company to sell cosplay photos of someone as stock photos WITHOUT the cosplayer's permission or prior consent?

I ask this because I'm currently going through this issue with a particular company regarding photos taken of me and my group at Anime Expo. Without getting into too much of the detail, you can read my post in General Cosplay chat here:

http://www.cosplay.com/showthread.php?t=257254

I encourage all to read this and I really hope that I can get some feedback on this matter from both a photographers perspective and cosplayers. All help and opinions are definitely appreciated. Thanks! =)
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Unread 10-21-2011, 05:31 PM   #359
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I was also approached to sell some of my cosplay photos, but thankfully after getting feedback from some folks it is clear that a model release form's required for each photos.

I am quite surprised that this has happened.

PS. Actually sales by the press seems to be a common practice, but there are specific terms and conditions prior to purchasing the photos (such as people can only buy the photos for personal keepsake?):

http://www.photobank.com.sg/about.html
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Last edited by Hexlord : 10-21-2011 at 05:40 PM.
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Unread 10-21-2011, 05:54 PM   #360
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Most of the time it’s both the Photographer and the Cosplayer that have their photos used without consent. In this case, the Photographer is in bed with the agency so that makes it a bit more complicated.

What they’re doing is “probably” not illegal because they’re not using your images to promote/advertise/or for political reasons. What they are doing is unethical (although they probably don’t think so) and a violation of Anime Expo rules. I would file a complaint with the AX press department. Also, you might want inform the Photographer that MANY cosplayers are minors and selling their pictures without parental consent may be grounds for a civil suit.
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