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Unread 07-03-2014, 10:38 PM   #1
m15terp1nk
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Resin and bondo advice

Working on a mask that I constructed in papekura and am going to finish it in resin and bondo. I've never worked with this method before but have read several tutorials. Any helpful hints or tips from someone proficient in this method would be appreciated.
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Unread 07-04-2014, 04:06 PM   #2
daxwills
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What kind of Bondo?
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Unread 07-07-2014, 04:55 PM   #3
dizzymonochrome
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What kind of tips? Work outside, wear gloves (resin and fibreglass are sticky bastards), have power tools for finishing. Doing it by hand on a helmet is hella time consuming. In fact, don't start with a helmet or mask, or anything complex. You'll give up if you do. Start with an arm or leg piece instead
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Unread 07-07-2014, 07:29 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzymonochrome View Post
have power tools for finishing
I would caution that this is only a good idea if you're familiar working with power sanders. Otherwise they can do massive damage very quickly that'll be either a serious pain to repair or the damage can be permanent. However if you're good with it I complexly agree sanding by hand is taxing. However finish sanding (in my opinion) should always be hand done.
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Unread 07-08-2014, 01:25 PM   #5
dizzymonochrome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daxwills View Post
I would caution that this is only a good idea if you're familiar working with power sanders. Otherwise they can do massive damage very quickly that'll be either a serious pain to repair or the damage can be permanent. However if you're good with it I complexly agree sanding by hand is taxing. However finish sanding (in my opinion) should always be hand done.
Eh, it's good to learn. Start with a piece that you can easily start over if you really badly mess it up. No use being scared of power tools. If a parent or friend has them around already, just ask them to show you and then practice practice practice. My bf and his dad have a lot of power tools, and although I still don't use any saws, I got pretty good with the sanders. Follow safety precautions in the manual, wear a mask (a rebreather is even better), and protect your eyes.
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Unread 07-08-2014, 02:33 PM   #6
daxwills
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Depends on the sander. Use a DA sander and you'll be fine, 6" orbital you'll leave swirl marks, 4 1/2" right angle and the piece should be in pieces in very short order. A nice DA sander will only set you back about 60 bucks (good investment) and then just block sand it the rest of the way to create a smooth finished surface. But it takes serious practice and time to get to the point where you can do that.
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Unread 07-09-2014, 02:36 PM   #7
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thanks for spending the time to post responses guys but i kinda feel like its hard to exactly understand what you guys are talking about. to the beginner who goes on these forums who need help, we're really like at a kindergarten level. we dont know what anything means or needs to be done. why do we need to sand anything? to smooth it out? does it affect the paint? can you sand paint? what would happen then? and why would it take such a long time to practice? also i'd imagine whatever materials we are using, we arent just starting out with globs of it, we are most likely already cutting it into small parts and gluing it together. do we still sand that? even if the shape is right already? or is sanding more to get the specific shape you want. can you give some examples on what needs sanding? like iron mans helmet? or lokis helm? like which part would need sanding? what materials? like eva foam? or that foam stuff in a can? can you sand those? should you put magic putty on first?

and no one seemed to have answered his original questions...lol. it seems like people are just posting responses to get their posts count up.

thanks though. didnt meant to offend anyone.

Last edited by grapez : 07-09-2014 at 02:41 PM.
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Unread 07-09-2014, 02:38 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daxwills View Post
Depends on the sander. Use a DA sander and you'll be fine, 6" orbital you'll leave swirl marks, 4 1/2" right angle and the piece should be in pieces in very short order. A nice DA sander will only set you back about 60 bucks (good investment) and then just block sand it the rest of the way to create a smooth finished surface. But it takes serious practice and time to get to the point where you can do that.
whats a DA sander?
4 1/2 inch right angle? what? lol
can you explain block sanding? and why thats required?

Thanks!!
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Unread 07-09-2014, 02:48 PM   #9
daxwills
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Well I was really hoping the OP would answer the "what kinda bondo" question because I could have given more specific answers. Without the information, I can't respond with specific tips on working with bondo if I don't know the type. But I can answer your questions.

Why do we need to sand anything?

- Because bondo does not go on smoothly and evenly no matter how hard you try. So assuming you want a smooth even and finished surface to paint it will have to be sanded that way. The techniques/tools used to do this vary depending on type of bondo.

Why does it take so much practice?

- Because getting a true flat surface is a fine art and unless you're just a natural at it you'll end up screwing it up more than once learning how to do it. So I wouldn't practice on something you want to use. I'd practice on something completely random until you've gotten comfortable enough with the techniques to use them on something you want to keep.

What would need sanding?

- Anytime you put down bondo that surface will need to be sanded into it's finished shape. So it would depending what you built iron mans helmet out of. But assuming you're using bondo to finish the surface the whole thing would need to be painted. Otherwise you'll have pinholes, uneven surfaces, and flaws in the paint job.

- I can't speak to the last part of your question I was only commenting on the OP's desire to use a resin/bondo coating to finish the surface. Which is perfectly fine as long as you sand that surface flat and even for paint. if you don't you will be unlikely to be happy with the paint job you apply.
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Unread 07-09-2014, 11:05 PM   #10
EvilLittleKiss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapez View Post
and no one seemed to have answered his original questions...lol. it seems like people are just posting responses to get their posts count up.
Like daxwills said, they need OP to tell them what kind of bondo he's using in order to help him. Kind of hard to help someone if you don't even know what they're doing exactly. I don't know anything about bondo, but I assume that there are different types for different purposes or involve slightly different techniques. If they don't know what kind of bondo he's using and assume he's using a different kind, then tell him what to do with that kind, that could really screw up his project.

Until he tells them, this is the best anyone here can do so far. And even though I know nada about bondo, I was able to understand everything in this thread and it doesn't seem off-topic.
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Unread Yesterday, 08:45 AM   #11
dizzymonochrome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapez View Post
thanks for spending the time to post responses guys but i kinda feel like its hard to exactly understand what you guys are talking about. to the beginner who goes on these forums who need help, we're really like at a kindergarten level. we dont know what anything means or needs to be done. why do we need to sand anything? to smooth it out? does it affect the paint? can you sand paint? what would happen then? and why would it take such a long time to practice? also i'd imagine whatever materials we are using, we arent just starting out with globs of it, we are most likely already cutting it into small parts and gluing it together. do we still sand that? even if the shape is right already? or is sanding more to get the specific shape you want. can you give some examples on what needs sanding? like iron mans helmet? or lokis helm? like which part would need sanding? what materials? like eva foam? or that foam stuff in a can? can you sand those? should you put magic putty on first?

and no one seemed to have answered his original questions...lol. it seems like people are just posting responses to get their posts count up.

thanks though. didnt meant to offend anyone.
OP didn't ask a question. They just asked for "tips and advice", so we threw out whatever general tips and advice we thought of.

Like I said, don't start with a helmet. It's difficult and complex, and it could easily become disheartening. Start simple with arms or legs instead, and work yourself up to more complex parts.

OP also titled the thread resin and bondo, which lead us to assume the pepakura work would be done in paper, as that is the common route when using these materials. Foam is not usually part of the equation when working with resin and bondo, as it is a different technique not normally associated with each other. Your pepakura pattern is going to be different when working with foam. You cannot pepakura with spray foam.

I recommend you read threads on therpf.com and the405th.com about how to fabricate props and armor using pepakura, resin, and bondo. Lurk and read a lot of threads before you post questions over there. The RPF has a full sticky thread on how to use pepakura with paper/resin/bondo, and EVA foam.
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Last edited by dizzymonochrome : Yesterday at 08:47 AM.
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Unread Yesterday, 07:59 PM   #12
EvilLittleKiss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapez View Post
whats a DA sander?
4 1/2 inch right angle? what? lol
can you explain block sanding? and why thats required?

Thanks!!
1. "whats a DA sander?" Dude, you're on the internet. You can google that, it's a really simple question. I didn't know what one was either until 5 minutes ago when I googled "DA sander" and took a look at the images tab. They appear to be a circular handheld electric sander.

2. "4 1/2 inch right angle?" Once again, google. I wasn't entirely sure what a 4.5" right angle was either, I was thinking something along the lines of a sander used to sand right angles and that the circular part was 4.5 inches. I was half right. Another quick google image search showed me that it appears to be a sander that has a special handle that allows you to hold it at a right angle.

3. "can you explain block sanding? and why thats required?" Google can answer that too! Block sanding sounded familiar to me, so I looked it up to make sure it was what I thought it was. I was right. The first google result was this:

"Wrapping a piece of sand paper around a small block (usually wood) to give a flat surface for sanding larger flat areas"

Essentially, it's pretty much normal sanding. And from the very limited knowledge I have about my dad's power tools, I know they do a rough job. You have to go in and sand things by hand after sanding with an electric sander because the electric sander can't do a perfect job by itself.

I got these answers from less than 5 minutes of Google plus random memories of playing in my dad's and grandpa's workshops when I was in grade school. I barely understand power tools, and this was all very easy information to find. You can find it too.

I'm honestly not sure if you actually want to know the answers or are just asking us a ton of questions without listening for the answers like a bored little kid.
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