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Unread 12-26-2017, 05:41 PM   #1
Amethyst Nat
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Help with a petally skirt and adding to a base dress??

hello,I need advice please for making this dress to cosplay! my original character! So, for the skirt of the dress I want it to be fluffy and frilly, with the top few layers made with a translucent fabric put in a way reminiscent of rose petals (she is a flower elemental magical girl) . Any idea how I could go about this effect? I was thinking of having a few skirt circle cut with edges being pulled up drawstring , or should I cut out the 'petal' shapes individually? Also which fabric do you recomend? (gauze? chiffon? organza?) Also I do have a white sleeveless dress base I was thinking of using, how do I smoothly cover the white fabric with the coral fabric upon the bodice, or would it be easier just to dye it? I'm still a beginner at sowing...
ah right, included are 2 images I made of her, one stationary,the other how the skirt should move in a jump motion..
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=3&theater

and heres a photo of the base dress I was talking about, [IMG] https://imgur.com/o5Zyo8w [/IMG] ignore the feathers and top layer of gauze from an earlier cosplay I'll remove them. Its made from a kinda soft stretchy fabric, I don't know what. the front of the skirt was pinned up at 2 points and there was a built in underskirt of stretch transparent fabric and tulle. [IMG] https://imgur.com/8UBNwDE [/IMG]

Last edited by Amethyst Nat : 12-27-2017 at 03:33 PM.
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Unread 12-27-2017, 12:59 AM   #2
Bombdoll
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This might be some of that "blind leading the blind" kind of advice, but I've been a hobby Lolita for a number of years so I know a teensy bit about poofy knee-length skirts. I just know very little about sewing. That said I don't think a circle skirt can make the shape you want; they tend to be better for an a-line silhouette one sees in Rockabilly fashion and retro-styled swing dresses. What you drew looks a little more bell or cupcake shaped, and those shapes are best suited to rectangle skirts with gathered waists. This shape of skirt allows the poofy garment supporting the dress (usually an organza or chiffon bell-shaped petticoat or a hoop skirt) to fill out the hip region of the dress a little more than a circle skirt accommodates and it keeps the hem of the skirt from draping so loosely. If you want it frilled, you can stitch severa overlappingl layers of ruffles along the hem of the dress. You can even have ruffles covering the entire skirt if you're feeling saucy!

As for the petal shape for the waist region, i would use a mesh fabric like chiffon, organdie, or organza and follow this guide to give it a petal shape. I would personally keep this portion of the dress detachable as it might make storing the dress difficult if it was stitched on, but that's entirely your choice.
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Unread 12-27-2017, 09:13 AM   #3
Penlowe
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Chiffon is soft and drapey, organza is stiffer. For what you are doing, I'd go with either but over layers of stiff tulle to give it volume. (linked image below is tulle)

Look up lettuce edge hemming. It's actually pretty easy for a beginner (and something beginners do by accident when they are trying to make a nice hem on light fabrics)

You are totally over thinking the skirt shape thing, if you want petals, cut them in petal shapes. This is not anywhere close to your dress, and it's toddler size, but looking at it may help you: https://butterick.mccall.com/b5545
The underneath fluff layers are rectangles gathered into full skirts at the waist, with a top layer of petal shaped pieces, slightly gathered, and overlapping each other.

I would not advise trying to sew a new skirt on top of a whole dress. Make a separate skirt and put it on over the dress (so you can use the existing bodice I assume).
Why?
1) The dress wasn't made with the extra skirt in mind, it may sag or pull the bodice in weird or ugly ways.
2)If the dress is stretchy, mixing non-stretchy skirt fabrics with a stretch bodice is not a beginner task.
3) Trying to sew skirt sections or panels, particularly really fluffy ones in the middle of a dress is an exercise in frustration. Think about trying to get the waist area under the sewing arm, with all the skirt pinned, without catching some other part of the dress by accident. Ugh.

Last: This looks fun I like your design and it's not completely out of league for a beginner as you plan to use some ready made garments as (the harder to sew) part of it. I will warn you though it's going to need a LOT of yardage to get the look you want. Tulle is cheap but chiffon and organza are not. For a size 6 US adult I'd guesstimate 8-10 yards tulle and 5-6 chiffon or organza. That's at least $100 on sale. If you do just tulle you can save money, but it'll be scratchy to wear.
I love sheer fabrics because of what you can do with color. If you have deep orange layered under yellow layered under ivory, you get a beautiful ombre peach tone in the final project, with more intense color at the gathered areas softening at the edges where they fluff apart.
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Unread 12-27-2017, 03:31 PM   #4
Amethyst Nat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penlowe View Post
Chiffon is soft and drapey, organza is stiffer. For what you are doing, I'd go with either but over layers of stiff tulle to give it volume. (linked image below is tulle)

Look up lettuce edge hemming. It's actually pretty easy for a beginner (and something beginners do by accident when they are trying to make a nice hem on light fabrics)

You are totally over thinking the skirt shape thing, if you want petals, cut them in petal shapes. This is not anywhere close to your dress, and it's toddler size, but looking at it may help you: https://butterick.mccall.com/b5545
The underneath fluff layers are rectangles gathered into full skirts at the waist, with a top layer of petal shaped pieces, slightly gathered, and overlapping each other.

I would not advise trying to sew a new skirt on top of a whole dress. Make a separate skirt and put it on over the dress (so you can use the existing bodice I assume).
Why?
1) The dress wasn't made with the extra skirt in mind, it may sag or pull the bodice in weird or ugly ways.
2)If the dress is stretchy, mixing non-stretchy skirt fabrics with a stretch bodice is not a beginner task.
3) Trying to sew skirt sections or panels, particularly really fluffy ones in the middle of a dress is an exercise in frustration. Think about trying to get the waist area under the sewing arm, with all the skirt pinned, without catching some other part of the dress by accident. Ugh.

Last: This looks fun I like your design and it's not completely out of league for a beginner as you plan to use some ready made garments as (the harder to sew) part of it. I will warn you though it's going to need a LOT of yardage to get the look you want. Tulle is cheap but chiffon and organza are not. For a size 6 US adult I'd guesstimate 8-10 yards tulle and 5-6 chiffon or organza. That's at least $100 on sale. If you do just tulle you can save money, but it'll be scratchy to wear.
I love sheer fabrics because of what you can do with color. If you have deep orange layered under yellow layered under ivory, you get a beautiful ombre peach tone in the final project, with more intense color at the gathered areas softening at the edges where they fluff apart.
ok! thanks for the advice!
well, heres a photo of the base dress I was talking about, [IMG] https://imgur.com/o5Zyo8w [/IMG] ignore the feathers and top layer of gauze from an earlier cosplay I'll remove them. Its made from a kinda soft stretchy fabric, I don't know what. the front of the skirt was pinned up at 2 points and there was a built in underskirt of stretch transparent fabric and tulle. [IMG] https://imgur.com/8UBNwDE [/IMG]

ok, so you don't recommend putting the skirt layers on the dress. I guess this means I will have to sow up a bodice separately. Any lead on how I would do that?
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Unread 12-28-2017, 06:30 AM   #5
Penlowe
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To clarify:
Sew the skirt with it's own waistband, put it on over the dress, don't try to sew it to the dress.
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Unread 12-28-2017, 06:47 PM   #6
Amethyst Nat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bombdoll View Post
This might be some of that "blind leading the blind" kind of advice, but I've been a hobby Lolita for a number of years so I know a teensy bit about poofy knee-length skirts. I just know very little about sewing. That said I don't think a circle skirt can make the shape you want; they tend to be better for an a-line silhouette one sees in Rockabilly fashion and retro-styled swing dresses. What you drew looks a little more bell or cupcake shaped, and those shapes are best suited to rectangle skirts with gathered waists. This shape of skirt allows the poofy garment supporting the dress (usually an organza or chiffon bell-shaped petticoat or a hoop skirt) to fill out the hip region of the dress a little more than a circle skirt accommodates and it keeps the hem of the skirt from draping so loosely. If you want it frilled, you can stitch severa overlappingl layers of ruffles along the hem of the dress. You can even have ruffles covering the entire skirt if you're feeling saucy!

As for the petal shape for the waist region, i would use a mesh fabric like chiffon, organdie, or organza and follow this guide to give it a petal shape. I would personally keep this portion of the dress detachable as it might make storing the dress difficult if it was stitched on, but that's entirely your choice.

got it! Ah, do you recomend any tutorials for making rectangle skirts?
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Unread 12-28-2017, 06:49 PM   #7
Amethyst Nat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penlowe View Post
To clarify:
Sew the skirt with it's own waistband, put it on over the dress, don't try to sew it to the dress.
Oh, ok then.
What about for the bodice? is there any way to smoothly sow or glue or iron bond fabric onto it? or do you recomend I dye it?
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Unread 12-29-2017, 08:26 AM   #8
Penlowe
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Did not even register that the picture you linked the dress was a different color from the design. I get focused on the lines and construction thoughts and color goes out the window.

Lets back up a bit and start over with a fresh plan.
1. Put the dress back in your closet.
2. Buy one of these patterns. All will need some tweaking or changes, but I specifically picked ones that the hardest parts to fake/ do without a pattern are part of the design so you have instructions to follow.
a. https://butterick.mccall.com/b6129 add collar, add layers to skirt for more floof.
b. https://butterick.mccall.com/b4443 use strapless version, add collar/ sleeve piece. add layers to skirt for floof.
c. https://voguepatterns.mccall.com/v1094 This has exactly the lines you want and floof with only tiny changes to the collar bit... but it's Vogue, it will kick your a** in difficulty. Only try this if you have a very experiences sewist handy to you in person for help!
3. Give yourself plenty of time to get it done right.
~ As an experienced sewist who teaches newbies to sew, we have a formula for determining how many class hours a project will take. One of us does it, then we multiply by 4. That's how long the newbie will take to complete the same project in class with help. The top two dresses, with changes and adding more skirt layers, would take me about four hours each, from cutting to completion. The Vogue would probably take me 6-7 hours measured the same way. i.e. with help, this will take at least an entire weekend assuming you eat and sleep also. Plan for two weekends.

So you just read all that and are thinking 'but I don't sew! I can't possibly do that!' Yes you can. Be patient with yourself. The reason I recommend it is even a poorly executed dress from a pattern is going to look millions of times better than fabric glued on top of an existing dress.

There is a link in my signature to my blog, I have LOTS of information about planning your costumes as well as sewing stuff. I think the extra reading will help you.
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