Go Back   Cosplay.com > Cosplay Construction > Sewing/Fabric Craft

Reply
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Unread 02-12-2012, 10:17 AM   #1
Doctor Shinobi
Registered User
 
Doctor Shinobi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 144
Making natrual looking rips in fabric.

Just wondering, has anyone ever got to make rips in fabric that are intentional?
i have this cosplay which i want to make :


what i am trying to figure is a way to make those rips in the scarf. my first thought was using scissors, but i have a pretty good feeling those rips would just feel fake. i've seen the cosplay page of this person :

apparently he made those rips by burning the fabric.

now.. what do you think of that method? would it be good with a red fabric? would it be good at all? perhaps i should first cut it with scissors and then burn it?
Doctor Shinobi is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Unread 02-12-2012, 11:34 AM   #2
Evil Bishounen
Hail to the King
 
Evil Bishounen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,183
Yes, cut and then burn. But be aware that you need to use a burnable fabric in the first place.

Many synthetic fabrics (read: 100% polyester) will not burn and instead will just kinda slag around the edges. A polyester blend (like cotton/poly or poly/rayon) is more likely to burn because of the natural content, but the polyester will slag and seal the edges so they don't continue to ravel.

A natural fabric will definitely burn and give you the most spread, though it probably won't be self-sealing and could continue to ravel afterward. If this is the look you want, awesome. If not, then you'd have to put a sealing agent like Fray Block or Fray Chek on the edges.

Ask your local fabric store if they'll cut swatches for you so you can do burn tests.
__________________
FF9 cosplay? Hit me up!

2014: Anime Los Angeles and whatever else falls into my lap

I now have a Tumblr. Sometimes I use it.
Evil Bishounen is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-12-2012, 12:37 PM   #3
Doctor Shinobi
Registered User
 
Doctor Shinobi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 144
thnaks i remember you helped me last time too.
i have no idea if the fabrics i've got are synthetic or natrual, but i guess i'll burn a piece of it to test out.

also.. what's a fray blok\fray check?
Doctor Shinobi is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-12-2012, 01:21 PM   #4
inu.matto
Imperial Fist's waifu :3
 
inu.matto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 319
Fray block/check is some substance that seals the material to prevent further fraying.
inu.matto is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-12-2012, 02:05 PM   #5
Evil Bishounen
Hail to the King
 
Evil Bishounen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by inu.matto View Post
Fray block/check is some substance that seals the material to prevent further fraying.
^ This.

They're two different products but they do the same thing. Fray Chek is made by Dritz and Fray Block is made by June Tailor. Fray Block is slightly cheaper so it's what I use. You can get them at Joann or other sewing/quilting stores. I think I've seen at least one of them in the little craft aisle at Wal-Mart too.

Note: the instructions on Fray Block say to heat it by putting the tube under hot running water, but in my experience this is pointless and makes it 10 times harder to use. Heating it makes it lose viscosity so it becomes virtually uncontrollable - way too much comes out and it'll bleed throughout your fabric and oversaturate it. The stuff really isn't thick to begin with so it doesn't need to be made more runny. Also, it seals just fine without being heated. Use it straight out of the tube and ignore the instructions.
__________________
FF9 cosplay? Hit me up!

2014: Anime Los Angeles and whatever else falls into my lap

I now have a Tumblr. Sometimes I use it.

Last edited by Evil Bishounen : 02-12-2012 at 02:07 PM.
Evil Bishounen is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-12-2012, 02:10 PM   #6
k2thyme
Registered User
 
k2thyme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 51
I apologize if this is slightly off topic, but what character/series is this image from? It looks amazing.
k2thyme is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-12-2012, 02:20 PM   #7
Doctor Shinobi
Registered User
 
Doctor Shinobi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 144
the ninja with the red scarf is hotsuma from the PS2 game Shinobi(one of my favorite games ).the second image is sayoran i think from tsubasa chronnicels (bah, not sure i know how to spell it).

now about the sealing... is that really necessary to buy these products? i could just wet the fabric with water and a brush to make sure the fire doesn't go beyond where i want it to go.

Last edited by Doctor Shinobi : 02-12-2012 at 03:40 PM.
Doctor Shinobi is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-12-2012, 04:43 PM   #8
Evil Bishounen
Hail to the King
 
Evil Bishounen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Shinobi View Post
now about the sealing... is that really necessary to buy these products? i could just wet the fabric with water and a brush to make sure the fire doesn't go beyond where i want it to go.
I don't think you're fully understanding, so maybe I can clarify a little.

First, if you already have your fabric for this scarf, use a swatch of it in a burn test. You need to see how the fabric reacts to flame. Will it even burn? If so, how does it burn? Different textiles burn in different ways. Silk and cotton burn very readily and will turn to ash (and in different ways). Polyester, on the other hand, is more resistant to flame, and it does not turn to ash.

Polyester is basically a plastic fiber - it does not burn, it melts. Have you ever thrown a plastic Dixie cup into a bonfire before? (If not, I highly recommend it sometime. It's very entertaining.) It just stands there in the fire for a few seconds, then it suddenly wobbles and melts into a puddle of colored goo. A paper cup, on the other hand, will catch fire and leave ash behind. Same idea with synthetic vs natural fibers.

Now, for the other half of this equation: fabric unravels. This is why we need to hem garments, finish our fabric edges, or seal the fabric, otherwise the garment will fall apart over time. So, if you don't want your scarf to keep unraveling and losing fibers after you've cut and burned it, you need to make sure the edges are all sealed.

If you burn polyester or polyester blends, the polyester content leaves a melted edge behind. This means that if you put it to flame, the edge will be sealed at the same time, stopping the fabric from unraveling. It's a two-in-one process.

If you burn natural fibers, the edge is -not- self-sealing. The edge will be flaky ash and the fibers could still continue to unravel. This is where you'd need a sealing agent like Fray Block. You would apply it AFTER you've done all your burning to preserve your work.

Do not try to use Fray Block to control the flame, and do not burn fabric after applying it. It is flammable. You may end up with toxic fumes or a fireball in your face.
__________________
FF9 cosplay? Hit me up!

2014: Anime Los Angeles and whatever else falls into my lap

I now have a Tumblr. Sometimes I use it.
Evil Bishounen is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-12-2012, 05:17 PM   #9
Doctor Shinobi
Registered User
 
Doctor Shinobi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 144
oh wow, thanks O: i actually thought i need to apply it before flaming. i'll give it a try, so thanks ^^
Doctor Shinobi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:39 PM.


Copyright 2002-2013 Cosplay.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
All comments and posts in our forums are the opinion of the respective poster.