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Unread 06-24-2012, 11:29 PM   #1
animetears4
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Photoshoot Advice

I wanted to ask everyone some advice about dealing with a fast-paced photoshoot setting. My friend and I went to animeNORTH in Canada for the first time this year. My friend was asked to host a big photoshoot. I have just gotten into using a DSLR like 4 months ago. I basically learned everything I know so far about photography from YouTube videos and a bunch of reading and experimenting with my own camera. I tend to use manual mode the most and I don't like to use flash (I didn't have a speedlight at the time and I knew that flash would white out everyone's faces). However, during the photoshoot I always had to ask the models to hold the pose as I adjusted the settings. It became such a hassle I switched to automatic mode halfway through the shoot, but, the pictures did not come out so well. So, my question is what is the best semi-automatic mode to be in for photoshoots like these? If you guys would like to see the shots I have taken to understand what I'm talking about, here is the link to my photobucket album: http://photobucket.com/Atlus2012

Critiques are welcome as well

Thank you very much =D
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Unread 06-26-2012, 09:48 PM   #2
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Hi,

Try shooting in Aperture Mode (Av mode) on your camera. Basically you will set the aperture depending on how much of the image you want to be in focus and then the camera will set the shutter speed for you. If you are going to shoot where there is plenty of ambient light and the conditions will not change much this would probably be your best bet.

That's how I started shooting in aperture mode first and then moved on to manual mode for certain situations.

For a more detailed explanation, this is a pretty good video:

http://youtu.be/gEfXs7G8eK4

Happy shooting!
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Unread 06-26-2012, 10:12 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rander View Post
If you are going to shoot where there is plenty of ambient light and the conditions will not change much this would probably be your best bet.
Thanks for the advice! =D I actually switch to aperture mode at one point but the lighting kinda screwed me over >.< The photoshoot location was at a spot where there was a bunch of trees that was shading the area. I managed to pull off some nice pictures because the sun was behind me at the time to give me enough light.
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Unread 06-26-2012, 10:31 PM   #4
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I rather like shade from a tree as it helps to kill off shadows on people's faces. Plus it gives people something to interact with.
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Unread 06-26-2012, 10:32 PM   #5
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I think the background noise has a lot to do with it as well. Extra people, cars, etc. I know my camera tends to not be able to focus as well/quickly if there's a lot of stuff going on. Your models may not be moving, but there sure is a lot of movement in the background.

That being said, Aperture Mode is probably your best option for most things. I'd go shoot around with different settings on inanimate objects first, in different lighting, and see what works best for you. Then practice with people once you learn what settings are best for the environment you're in
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Unread 06-26-2012, 10:38 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DireKitty View Post
I rather like shade from a tree as it helps to kill off shadows on people's faces. Plus it gives people something to interact with.
I really like the effect of sunlight shining through the leaves of tree down onto the subject it makes the shot look so beautiful and mysterious at the same time X3
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Unread 06-26-2012, 10:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Makira View Post
That being said, Aperture Mode is probably your best option for most things. I'd go shoot around with different settings on inanimate objects first, in different lighting, and see what works best for you. Then practice with people once you learn what settings are best for the environment you're in
Thanks for the tip! =D My friend and I are planning to do some photoshoot stuff with our characters so it will give me some good practice. Luckily I bought a reflector board so I want to test it out if it will give me some good lighting =3
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Unread 06-27-2012, 12:32 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animetears4 View Post
The photoshoot location was at a spot where there was a bunch of trees that was shading the area.
Your photos may have been backlit (bright background, dark subjects). If you weren't using spot metering, give that a try. A lot of cameras default metering is evaluative which measures the whole scene. If you use spot and focus on the the main subject who is in the shade that may help with the exposure.

You could try using the pop up flash as fill flash. As long as it is not the main/only light it doesn't look too bad. Its not nearly as bad as straight flash in a dark room, since the pop us flash is supplementing the main (sun) light.
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Unread 06-28-2012, 02:13 PM   #9
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I've pretty much began learning how to use the DSLR not that long as well, but here is my two cents.

At one point before, I had always used the P (on my Nikon DSLR, I think it's PV on the canon... yeah I think) and it did most of the work for me sometimes because it decided what would work best in that situation if I changed something like the aperture, so it automatically would fix to match the change of my aperture.

But now I use manual mode most of the times depending if the weather looks like it would stay consistent or not. And I only change settings if I want a different effect on my photos.

: 3 I see that you had a large group in your photoshoot. Large group can always be hectic and if it was fast paced, even more hectic! Kudos to you. I say in the next photoshoot, even if there are a lot of people, try to aim for your photos to have a nice composition that looks pleasing to the eye. : 3 Line people up differently or try for a different angle instead of straight-on. And try to have less distracting things in the background as well. It makes the photo look even better (unless the photo was meant to have people or things in the background, haha).

Good luck to us both (about learning more about photography!). : 3
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Unread 06-28-2012, 05:38 PM   #10
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The exposures look good. Need to work on framing/cropping.
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Unread 07-01-2012, 10:01 AM   #11
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Although you say you don't like to use flash, I strongly advise you to buy one. It will give you a whole new 'light' to your photographs.

'Whiting out' you are concerned about is basically of too much light from the flash - and the getting the correct exposure with flash is of a subtle art of knowledge, experiences, and luck. So, I understand why you dislike it; but when you know what to do, then you would not leave it behind. There are so much to do with one, especially in fast-paced photo shootings.

I personally use M mode, with spot metering. When you know what to do, it is much easier to get (or rather choose) the right exposures without much fumbling. Do not fear to experiment - experience alone does not make good photographs, but to learn, you should make mistakes.
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Unread 07-02-2012, 09:05 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enthalion View Post
Although you say you don't like to use flash, I strongly advise you to buy one. It will give you a whole new 'light' to your photographs.

'Whiting out' you are concerned about is basically of too much light from the flash - and the getting the correct exposure with flash is of a subtle art of knowledge, experiences, and luck. So, I understand why you dislike it; but when you know what to do, then you would not leave it behind. There are so much to do with one, especially in fast-paced photo shootings.

I personally use M mode, with spot metering. When you know what to do, it is much easier to get (or rather choose) the right exposures without much fumbling. Do not fear to experiment - experience alone does not make good photographs, but to learn, you should make mistakes.
Thanks for the advice! =D As of right now I'm learning all that I can about how to properly use flash for portrait photography. I'm experimenting with diffusing the flash using ordinary wax paper held in front of the pop up flash and it seems to be working rather well =3 I am saving up money right now to buy an external flash that I can use as a slave to act as fill light for low light situations. So far, there seems to be a TON of technical stuff to learn about external flash that I'm kinda getting overwhelmed with it all @_@ But I won't give up I'm always willing to learn more X3
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Unread 07-18-2012, 02:23 PM   #13
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concentration, absorption, assiduity, density and immersion you always need of these adjectives on your activity thus you can be a great photographer.
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Unread 07-19-2012, 08:54 PM   #14
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Digital Photography, now surfacing and abandoning the older art of film photography, is slowly capturing the hearts of most enthusiasts of photography in general. The more user friendly type of controls and easier accessibility made it even more popular. In film photography, where the focus is more on the negatives and developing the same, was more tuned to older enthusiasts. More, the necessity for a darkroom to develop images made this art accessible to rich people.
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Unread 06-23-2013, 12:14 PM   #15
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Aperture mode would be the best. Also if you have a large enough memory card and the post processing skills shoot in RAW. I have saved photos that I thought were gonners and this has been within the last month or so since I switched...... For off camera flash it's easy to be overwhelmed cause so many tutorials I have read focus on studio and professional setups. Best I have found is just to make sure that it is not pointed at your subject. 45 degree angle or 90 degrees are the more commonly used.

Also look at lens options as well. There are lots of reviews on lenses through youtube and across the internet. Also don't be afraid to ask any local photographers. I have been really lucky and been surrounded by many local hobbiest and professionals who are always there to help me with settings and some tricks.
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