Go Back   Cosplay.com > Cosplay Construction > Props/Accessories/Armor

Reply
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 24 votes, 5.00 average.
Unread 10-22-2012, 07:49 PM   #1
AshofRebirth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 844
How to make hoof boots

I'm stumped.. How would you make something like this? That are heel-less hooves but ALSO boots?

I know you have to chop off the heel.. I'm just stumped on how you add to the ball of the foot in a way that's sturdy


http://www.etsy.com/listing/10350150...me-custom-epic

http://www.etsy.com/listing/10690182...f-boots-custom

http://www.etsy.com/listing/97407034...me-custom-made


And the most important question.. What boots should I use as a base?
__________________
AshofRebirth Cosplay

I support Loose Cannons Props! And you should too!

Last edited by AshofRebirth : 10-22-2012 at 07:54 PM.
AshofRebirth is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Unread 10-22-2012, 09:27 PM   #2
rj_sosongco
Rated R for Radical!
 
rj_sosongco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 498
Hoof shoes, and heel-less shoes in general, often have some kind of special internal support to offset the weight usually put on the heel, and to divert that weight to the middle or ball of the foot. I would highly advise NOT simply chopping off the heel of a normal high heel, as you could damage the existing internal structure, which could cause the shoe to fall apart. On top of that, you could put yourself at risk of a sprain, a broken ankle, or any one of a handful of lower leg/foot injuries. This is a task for someone skilled at shoemaking that can fabricate a safe way for you to walk.

Odds are that the person that created your reference used existing heel-less shoes and added the hoof or paw external to the structure. Or, they have enough extensive knowledge and experience in making heel-less shoes to fabricate their own.
rj_sosongco is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2012, 01:42 AM   #3
AshofRebirth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 844
I didn't get the chopping off the heel thing out of nowhere.. I've actually seen quite a few hoof-boot tutorials do this.

http://www.cosplayprodigy.com/TUTORIALhoofboots.html

http://www.pets-de.org/lib/others/boots/hoofall.html

Edit: More
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1XR4tn7ExE&

Actually every single hoof-boot tutorials I've looked at except a few call for chopping of the heel. Which is why I've avoided them until now



Yes, I know it's possible for a non-shoemaker to do this. Yes, I know they're more difficult to walk in.
Just a note to anyone else who'd like to reply: I'd like actually information on how to go about these. Not advice on why not to do it. Thank you.

But actually I realized that one of the tutorials I posted could help me out. So my new question: What material can I use that will blend in the leather/vinyl of the boot better? The tutorials are kind of made in a way that it doesn't look too pretty on its own.. which is why you cover it with fur, etc.
__________________
AshofRebirth Cosplay

I support Loose Cannons Props! And you should too!

Last edited by AshofRebirth : 10-23-2012 at 01:53 AM.
AshofRebirth is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2012, 09:19 PM   #4
verdatum
Extremely registered user
 
verdatum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,446
So, this cosplayprodigy link recommends using Bondo to reinforce the arch of the shoe. This is ungood. Bondo does almost nothing to reinforce in that direction. Instead, you really should be using a piece of steel that is curved properly to maximize strength. It sorta ends up looking like a shoe-horn but not quite. If you read the youtube comments of the etsy person, she explains that she does indeed reinforce hers with steel. You'd want to bolt that between the shoe and the toe. Then you can hide the steel piece with the Bondo step.

If you track down the How It's Made segment on Firemen's boots, you will see the sort of steel support needed. (Firemen's boots need it so they can climb ladders all day without hurting their arches.)

You could make it using around 1/16'' cold-rolled steel, cut to size with an angle grinder, and cold-hammered into shape over an anvil horn (a railroad track anvil might be sufficient, but it would take a bit more skill).

If you want to blend into vinyl, you can use vinyl, and if you want to blend into leather, you can use leather. You stretch it over the wooden toe and adhere it in place using contact cement. To get it pretty, you must carefully work out how to cut the piece of fabric or leather to transform it into a nice 3-dimensional shape. Often, this involves tricks like cutting out darts, and sewing seams together with an invisible stitch.

The How It's Made segment on western saddle making also gives you a lot of the techniques that would be involved (Is it obvious how much I love that show?). Saddles are likewise a combination of steel, wood, and leather. Tracking down books on saddle making, upholstery, and traditional shoemaking (circa late 18th, early 19th century) would also help. (Random Fun Fact: don't call shoemakers "cobblers". It's an insult in their parlance.) Fortunately, many of these books are now in the public domain and available free through Google Books. Just go to "advanced search" and select the "free books only" option.
__________________
Founder Special FX wiki http://fx.wikia.com

Last edited by verdatum : 10-23-2012 at 09:23 PM. Reason: Perfectionism ;)
verdatum is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-23-2012, 11:37 PM   #5
AshofRebirth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 844
Thanks a bunch! That really helps me out
Verdatum always comes to save the day XD

Actually, just to make sure I'm understanding you correctly:



Blue is the added hoof. The yellow is the steel. Is that where I should put it?
__________________
AshofRebirth Cosplay

I support Loose Cannons Props! And you should too!

Last edited by AshofRebirth : 10-23-2012 at 11:50 PM.
AshofRebirth is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-24-2012, 02:37 AM   #6
verdatum
Extremely registered user
 
verdatum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,446
As I understand it, the steel needs to go all the way up to the back of the heel of the foot. How far it really needs to go is partially dependent on how much wood is left in the heel, and if that wood can be bonded to the steel without just creating a hinge. Basically, you want to be able to drop the heel of your foot, putting a portion of your weight on the heel portion of the shoe, without the shoe bowing down.

Naturally, if you put too much of your weight on the heel, your center of gravity will shift behind the wood block, and you'll teeter right onto your ass. (yeah, I'm about to talk about safety shit, deal with it). You should not only practice being able to walk in these, but also practice being able to fall without cracking/spraining something. Practicing the right way to fall is done in sports ranging from martial arts, to football, to figure-skating. I strongly recommend only walking in these in public when you have a dedicated handler standing at the ready. The handler's job is to keep people at a safe distance, and to keep the side closest to you rigid so if you stumble, you can fall upon the handler without the both of you crashing (I learned this one the hard way). Further, in a convention environment, you constantly need to have in your mind, "what am I going to do if a fire breaks out?" A flood of people behind you will start pushing towards the exit, and you will likely not have a place to squat down and unlace them. In the unlikely event of an emergency, you need to be able to evacuate quickly without stumbling. In some cases, your best bet may even be to entreat the biggest guy in the immediate vicinity to fireman carry you over his shoulders to safety.

I used to at least slightly dismiss this sort of safety stuff until a) I sprained my ankle walking down steps at a convention because the one-eyed character I was playing killed my depth perception, and b) I kinda sorta set my house on fire and seriously burned myself in the process. Now I'm pretty sure that whole "be prepared" thing ain't such a bad idea.
__________________
Founder Special FX wiki http://fx.wikia.com
verdatum is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-29-2012, 03:47 AM   #7
AshofRebirth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 844
Sorry for the late response. Internet has been out and took me a while to figure out how to login onto the sad excuse of mobile version of Coscom,.
I really appreciate the safety tips. Truely. I never would have thought to practice how to/ fall/. I just didn't want a whole onslaught of people telling me to not even try it as if I haven't done anyvreasearch whatsoever.
Another question though... is there/ anything/ I can use for that support other than steel? I'm assuming it has to be a piece you cant bend with your hand's... I'm having a really hard time finding someone who can bend it. So an alternative would be nice
__________________
AshofRebirth Cosplay

I support Loose Cannons Props! And you should too!
AshofRebirth is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 10-30-2012, 05:00 PM   #8
verdatum
Extremely registered user
 
verdatum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,446
You could potentially construct something out of carbon fiber + epoxy resin. Carbon fiber is fairly pricey stuff, and to properly cure it (needed for maximum strength), you must use vacuum-bag lamination, which requires either a vacuum pump (generally the kind used in HVAC maintenance) or a decent sized air compressor + a venturi fitting, plus a special flexible bag, textured sheet, absorbent layer, vacuum-seal tape, and a bunch of hoses and pipe-fittings to hook everything together.

Further, you need to know before you purchase your materials, just what are the appropriate fabric weights, thicknesses, and weave-orientations needed to support the forces put upon it. The forces will be something like body-weight * 2. Figuring this stuff out either requires some pretty complicated mechanical engineering, or a decent amount of trial and error.

Fiberglass, aramid fiber (aka Kevlar), or molded wood veneer laminate (basically custom-made curvy plywood. It's the technique used to make wooden skateboard decks) might be sufficient, I really don't know. They all involve pretty much the same technique as the carbon fiber, they're just cheaper materials.
__________________
Founder Special FX wiki http://fx.wikia.com
verdatum is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-13-2012, 06:21 AM   #9
AshofRebirth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 844
Just wanted to give an update. I made them! I actually forgoed the extra support because of time and the shoe itself had its own sturdy base to it.

My calves hurt now, but other than that, walking in them was fine
__________________
AshofRebirth Cosplay

I support Loose Cannons Props! And you should too!
AshofRebirth is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:39 AM.


Copyright 2002-2013 Cosplay.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
All comments and posts in our forums are the opinion of the respective poster.